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Full text of "History of Putnam County, New York : with biographical sketches of its prominent men"

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3 1833 03687 4896 

Gc 9 74, 701 P9 8p 

Pelletreau. William S. 1840- 

1918. 
History of Putnam County, 

New York 



HISTORY OF 

PUTNAM COUNTY 



NEW YORK, 



WITH- 



Biographical Sketches of its Prominent Men. 



AVILLTAM S. PELLETREAU, A. M.. 

of Histories of Soiuhampton, SouthoM and Ea^Mhampton, SutTnlU County ; Hislo 
thens and Co.vsackie, Greene County; and Haverstraw, Rockland County, N. Y. 



Philadelphia: 
W. W. PRESTON & CO. 



All«n County Piibl^ 

900 Webster Strew ,^ 

PC Box 2270 

Fort Wavne, IN 45801-2270 



1293898 

TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



INTRODUCTORY CHAPTER. page. 

Early Discoveries 1 

CHAPTER n. 

Ad.jlpli Plnlii)se and liis Patent 10 

CHAPTER HI. 

The Philipse Family '. 20 

CHAPTER IV. 

The Division of the Higliland Patent 40 

CHAPTER V. 
Tlie Wapj)in;<er Indians and their Controversy with the Heirs of Adolph 
Philipse 6o 

CHAPTER VI. 

Confiscation and Sale of tlie Shares of the Patent belonging to Susannah 

Robins(3n and Mary Philipse 87 

CHAPTER VII, 

The Gore 102 

CHAPTER VIII. 
The Oblong 103 

CHAPTER IX. 

Settlement and Population IIS 

CHAPTER X. 
Roads and F.-rries 130 

CHAPTER XI. 
Political Divisions 14o 

CHAPTER XII. 
Establishment of Putnam County; County Institutions and Ccumty Officers. . 101 

CHAPTER XIII. 
The Claim of Jolin Jacob Astor ITS 



ii TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

CHAPTER XIV. PAGE. 
Putnam County During the CItII War 303 

CHAPTER XV. 
The Militia of Putnam County 219 

CHAPTER XVI. ■ 

THE BENCH AND BAR OF PUTN.\M COUNTY. 

Hon. James Kent.— Henry B. Lee.— Ralsaman C. Austin.— George W. Niven. — 
Frederic Stone. — Walker Todd. — Jeremiah Hine. — Henry B. Cowles. — 
EUjah Yerks. — Howard H. White. — Benjamin Bailey. — John G. Jliller. — 
Charles Ga Nun.— Peter M. Jordan.— William A. Dean.— Levi H. McCoy.— 
James D. Little.— Charles H. Slosson.— Samuel J.Owen.— Owen T. Coflin. — 
William J. Blake. — Jackson O. Dykman. — George W. Horton. — Ambrose 
Ryder. — Edward Wright. — Chai-les H. Ferris. — Hon. William Wood. — 
Seymour B. Nelson. — James Gardiner. — Abrani J. Miller. — William H. 
Haldane. — George E. Anderson. — Ward B. Yeomans. — Frederic S.Bamum. 
—Clayton Ryder.— Hon. Hamilton Fish, jr.— Hon. Robert A. Livingston. 224 
CHAPTER XVII. 

TUB MEDICAL HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

Dr. Robert Weeks. — Ebeuezer Fletcher. — Daniel Reed. — William G. Hopkins. — 
Aaron Carman. — Noah Hill Crane. — Dr. Rowland. — Frederick Fletcher.— 
Ebenezer F. Boyd.— Dr. Barnuui.— Asher Gilbert.— Dr. Adams.— Dr. 
Boardman.— Edward Crosby.— J. Homer Smith.— Frederick D. Lente.— 
Ira H. Walker.— Ed waid B. Tm-ner.- Joseph H. Bailey.— Daniel Bidl.— 
John Hamilton. — Joseph C. Crane. — J. Q. Adams. — Addison Ely. — Nathan 
W. Wlieeler.— Jonathan F. Seeley.— Austin La Monte.— George W. Mur- 
dock. — Jared G. Wood. — Lewis H. Miller. — Edson Card, jr. — James Had- 

ilen.— Ernest Hebrsmith.— Medical Societies 251 

CHAPTER XVIII. 

Education 278 

CHAPTER XIX. 

TOWN OF CARMEL. 

Settlement and Early History. — Village of Carmel. — Lake Gleneida.— Carmel 
Collegiate Institute and Drew Ladies' Seminary. — Carmel Literary 
Union.— Railroad.— Bank.— Newspapers.— The Gilead Church.— Rev. 
Daniel D. Sahlor.— Gilead Burying Ground. — James Rayuiond.- Moimt 
Carmel Baptist Ciuirch.— Rev. W'illiam S. Clapp.— Metliodist Episcopal 

Church -J^l 

CHAPTER XX. 
TOWN OF CARMEL (Continued). 

Lake !Mahopac. — Hotels and Boardin.g Houses. — Lake Mahopac Improvement 
Company. — Mahopac Land Compan}-. — Putnam Land Company. — The 
l.-.lands of Laki' Mahopac. — Lake Mahopac Methodist Cliurch. — Protestant 
Episcojial Church. — Roman Catholic Church. — Union Valley Cemetery and 
Chapel- Mount Hope Methodist Chapel.— Red Mills.— JIahopac Iron Ore 
Company.— Re<l Mills Baptist Cliurcli.— Red Mills Presbyterian Cluu-ch.- 
Rev. Harris Rogers Schenck.— Putnam County Seminary As.sociation.— 
W. 'Stern Part of Carmel.— Supervisors 337 



TABLE OF CONTEXTS. Ill 

CHAPTER XXI. PAGE. 
TOWN OF CARiiEL (Concluded). 
The Hill Fiimily.— The Crane Family.— The Baldwin Family.— Tlie Ban-ett 
Family.— Abram Cronk. —Cornelius Dean.— Alotson Dean.— Lewis Lud- 
ington.— Charles Henry Ludington.— James Ludington.— Zalmon Luding- 
ton. — Deacon Aaron Ganong. — Leonard Yeamans. — The Badeau Family. — 
The Hazen Family. — .Jeremiah W. Hazen. — The Gregory Family. — The 
Austin Family. — Lewis Ga Nun. — Thaddeus R. Ganung. — Robert D. 
Wixsom. — Nathan L.Thompson. — James C. Gulick. — The Miller Family. — 
Dr. Henry F. Miller.— Hon. Henry D. Clapp.— Bryant S. Palmer.— Dr. 
James H. Merritt.— The Foster Family.— William W. Everett.— The 
Weeks Family 361 

CHAPTER XXII. 

TOWN OF SOUTHEAST. 

Settlement and Early History.— Early Records.— Supervisors. — Philipse Lot 
No. 8.— The Fowler Family.— Middletown.— Columbia Library.— South- 
east Center.— Presbyterian Chm-ch at Southeast Center. — Doansburg. — 
DeForest's Corners.— Line between Lots 8 and 9.— Pi-esbyterian Church at 
Doansburg.— Dykeman"s Station.— Baptist Church at Dykeman's Station. 412 

CHAPTER XXIII. 

TOWN OF SOUTHEAST (Concluded). 
Village of Brewster. — Savings Bank.— Croton River Bank.— First National 
Bank.— Fires and Fire District.— Newspapers.— Emerson W. Addis.— Bor- 
den Condensed Milk Factory.— Brewster Hill.— Methodist Church.— St. 
Andrew's Church.— Baptist Chm-ch.— Roman Catholic Chiu-ch. —Societies. 
Iron Mines.— Croton Reservoir.— Descendants of Rev. Elisha Kent. — Enoch 
Crosby.— The Doane Family.— Daniel Drew.— The TheaU Family.— Gen. 
James Ryder.— Samuel H. Everett.— Daniel W. Dykman. — The Brewster 
Family. — The Howes Family.— Joshua Barnum.— Morgan Horton.— John 
T. Waring.— Levi H. Roberts.— The Reed Family.— Charles E. Everett. . . 4oo 

CHAPTER XXIV. 

TOWN OF PHILIPSTOWN. 

Erection and Bomidaries.— The River Lots.— Beverly Robinson.— William 
Dennini'.— Beverly Farm. — Beverly House. — Arnold's Treason. — GaiTi- 
son's.- South Highlands Methodist Chm-ch.- The Hopper Mine.— Conti- 
nental Village.— Highland Chemical Works. — St. Philip's Church in the 
Highlands.— Methoilist Church at Garrison's.—Philipse Lot No. '2.- Set- 
tlers.— Early Town Records.— Revolutionary - 518 

CHAPTER XXV. 
TOWN OF PHILIPSTOWN (Concluded). 
Village of Cold Sprini^.— West Point Foundry.— Growth of Village.— lueor- 
porati<5n. — Col<l Spring Recorder. — Fires. — Philipstown Lodge. — Baptist 
Church.— St. Mary's Episcopal Church.— Methodist Church. — First Re- 
formed Cluu-ch. — Presbyterian Church. — Roman Catholic Church. — Cem- 
eteries. — Nelsonville. — West Point Iron Company. — Union Chapel. Me- 
keel's Corners.- Constituti(Mi Island.— North Part of Philipstown.— Col. 



iv TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

PAGE. 
Roger MoiTis.— Old Highland Methodist Church.— Northeast Part of 
To^vn.— Mm-ders. — SuperTisors.— Hon. Hamilton Fish, LL.D.— Hon. Ed- 
wards Pierrepont. — Edward PieiTepont. — Hon. Daniel P. and Arthui' In- 
graham. — Gouvemem' Kemble.— William D. Garrison. — James H. Hal- 
(lane.— Robert P. PaiTOtt.— Col. Thomas B. Arden.— Hem-y W. Belcher.— 
Osmond 31. Ba.xter.— Hon. George McCabe 557 

CHAPTER XXVI. 

TOWN OF PATTERSON. 

Licorporation.— Early Records.— Settlement.— Paterson Family. — Roads.— 
Early Inhabitants and theii- residences.— Civil List.— Change of Name.— 
Schools. — Franklin Union Library. — Pendergrast's Rebellion. — Presbyte- 
rian Chiu'ch. — Baptist Chiuxh. — Christ Church. — Quaker Meeting House. — 
Roman (catholic Church, Towner's Station.— Methodist Chapel, Ha%-i- 
land Hollow. — Revolutionary Items. — North Line of Lot 7. — Sylvester 

Mabie ' " 629 

CHAPTER XXVII. 

TOWN OF KENT. 

Settlement. — Cole's MiUs. — Boyd's Comers. — First Baptist Church. — Episcopal 
Chm-ch.- Richai-dville Chapel.— Boyd's Reservoir.— Fanner's Mills.— 
Baptist Church.— Other Localities.— Ludingtonville.— Col. Henry Luding- 
ton. — Second Baptist Church in Kent. — Change of Boundary. — Putnam 
Comity Bank. — Union Cemetery Association. — Mines. — Supervisors. — 
David Kent.— Daniel R. Nichols.— The To wnsend Family. — Coleman Rob- 
inson 675 

CHAPTER XXVIII. 

TOWN OF PUTNAM VALLEY. 

Establislmient and Boundaries.— Change of Name.— Settlement.- Cemeteries. 
— Peekskill Hollow Methodist Church.— Oscawana Lake. — Canopus Hol- 
low. — Baptist Chm'ch, Croft's Corners. — Methodist Chm-ch, Croft's Cor- 
ners.— Hempstead Huts.— Movmtain Chapel.— Oregon.— Solpew Pond.— 
Change of Bomidary. — Supervisors. — "Walter N. "Wood. — Hon. Saston 

Smith.— George William Lane 714 

CHAPTER XXIX. 

Personal Sketches 738 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



PORTRAITS. 

Putnam. Gen. Israel Frontispiec-e. 

Philip.se. Adolph.— ■• Patentee."" 14 

Philipse. Frederick,—" Yonker " or •• Judge." 30 

Pliilipse. Frederick.— ■■ Colonel." .32 

Philip^.'. Philip 'A 

I'liilipsi-. Frcdericlc— ■■ CaptaLii.'" 36 

Philips.'. Susannah.— 3fe. Robinson 40 



TABLE OF CONTEXTS. V 

PAGE. 

Philippe. Mary.— Mrs. MoiTis 43 

Philipse, Margar(.'t 44 

Morris. G«n. William H 2115 

Stone. Fi-ederif 22(5 

Little, James D 2:i4 

Blake, William J 230 

Dykman, Jackson 2.38 

Ryder. Ambrose 240 

Wright. Edward 242 

Wood. William 244 

Miller, Abram J 245 

Barnmu, Frederic S 246 

Fish, Hamilton, Jr 248 

■ Livingston, Robert A 250 

Lente. Fi-ederick D 258 

Adams. J. Q 263 

Wheeler, Nathan W 265 

Seeley . Jonathan F 269 

La Monte, Austin 267 

Murdock. George Wilson 268 

Miller, Lewis H 270 

Sahler, Rev, Daniel D 314 

Clapp. Rev. William S 333 

Hill, Isaac 363 

Hill. Solomon 363 

Crane. B. T 366 

Crane. Azor B 368 

Crane, Ira 369 

Baldwin, Hem-y S 370 

Barrett. Peter B 372 

BaiTett. Isaac D 374 

Dean. Cornelius 376 

Dean. Alotson 378 

Ludington. Lewis 3S0 

Ganong. Aaron 384 

Yeamans. Le(jnard 386 

Badeau. John H 388 

Hazen. Orson 390 

Hazen. Jeremiah W 390 

Austin. Amos L 394 

Cia Nun. Lewis 396 

fianung. Thaddeus R 398 

Wixsom. Rc.ljert D 400 

Thomp^^on. Nathan L 401 

(hilick. James C 403 

Mill.r. Henry F 404 

Claiip. Henry D 406 

Palmer. Bryant S 408 

Merritt. James H 409 

Everntt. William W 410 

Addi^. Emrrsnn W 460 



VI TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

PAGE. 

Doane, A. S 488 

Drew, Daniel 490 

Theall Thatcher H 492 

Theall, Arvah 494 

Everett, Samuel H 498 

Dykman, Daniel W 498 

Howes, Seth B., Sen 503 

Bamum, Joshua 506 

Horton, Morgan 508 

"Waring, John T 510 

Roberts, Levi P 512 

Eeed, Edwin 514 

Everett, Charles E 516 

Fish. Hamilton 588 

Pierrepont, Edwards 590 

Pierrepont, Edward 600 

Ingraham, Daniel P 614 

Ingraham. Arthur 615 

Garrison, William D 618 

Haldane, James H 620 

Belcher, Henry W 624 

Baxter, Osmond M 626 

McCabe, George 628 

Mabie, Sylvester 673 

Kent, David 704 

Nichols, Daniel R 706 

Townsend. C. C 708 

Robinson, Coleman 712 

Wood, "Walter N 734 

Smith, Saxton 736 

VIEWS. 

Court House and County Clerk's Office 166 

The Philipse Manor House 288 

Carmel in 1858 296 

Drew Ladies" Seminary. — Front view 300 

Drew Ladies' Seminary. — Rear view 301 

Maple Grove Cottage— Residence of D. W. Robinson 304 

Baptist Church. Carmel "Village 320 

Methodist Church, Carmel "Village 325 

Dean House. Lake Mahopac 334 

Old Red Mills 346 

Baptist Church, Mahopac Falls :J49 

Presbyterian Church. Mahopac Falls 352 

Residence of the hite Lewis Ludington. Carmel, N. "V 381 

'• Sunset Hill.- Rr^^idriice of James C. Gulick. Carmel, N. Y 403 

Residenrr n( 1 1, .ii. Henry D. Clapp. Cai-mel. N. Y 407 

'• Stoiielienge." Residence of S. B- Howes, Brewster, N. Y 503 

" Walnut Ridge." Residence of George Luff, Garrison's. N. Y 534 

" Mountain Home.'' Residence of A. G. Newman. Gamson's. N. Y 536 

St. Philips Chapel 5-11 



TA1!LK OF CONTEXTS. Vll 

PAUE. 

Ht. Mary's Cluircli in the llighlauils DOT 

■• Glenclitfe." Residence of Hon. Hamilton Fish, Garrison's, N. Y o89 

Ilurst-Pierreiiont in- tlie Higlihmds .■ji)! 

•• Fair View," Residen.-e of Walter N. Wood. Putnam Valley, N. Y 73.1 

•• Amcri.-an House."— Patterson ' 704 

MAPS, PLANS, ETC. 

3Iap of Putnam County 1 

Fac-siinile of Deed by Wappinger Indians to Dorland and Seabrant, July 

15th, 1691 " 12 

Autograph. A. Philipse 14 

Map of Philipse Patent 10 

Map of Oblong 17 

Fac-simile of Deed by Wappinger Indians to Adolph Philipse, Augrust 

13th, 1702 18 

Autograph, Philip Philipse 33 

Autogi-aph, Fred Philips, 1827 37 

Autograph, Freil Philipse, Administrator of Fred Pliilips, 1S3() 37 

The Land in Controversy 79 

Autographs, B. W. Robinson and others 1.^4 

Jlap Showing Original Farms around Lake MaJiopac 328 

West Corner of Lots 8 and 9. Philipse Patent 423 

Autograph Map with Notes and Letters from Chancellor Kent 438 

Map of Beverly Farm 530 

Autogi-aphs, Roger Mon-is. Mary Philipse and Susannah Robinson .i8(J 

Fac-simile of Commission to Henry Ludingtou as Colonel, June, 1776 692 

Fac-simile of Commission to Henry Ludingtou as Captain in Col. Beverly 

Robinson's Regiment 094 

Fac-simile of Commission to Henry Ludington. as Colonel, May 2Sth, 1778. . . 09i5 

Fac-simile of Order of Arrest issued by WilHani Duer 698 

Fac-simile of Letter from Nathaniel Sackett to Col. Hem-y Ludingti^n 7t)0 



ARTISTS. 
P. F. Goist. ■ F. M. Gilbert. 

ENGRAVERS. 

H. B. Hall's Sons. A. H. Ritchie. 

Sanuiel Sartain. 



PREFACE. 



IiS'' the summer of 18S5, the writer of this work was called 
from his home, at Southampton, L. I., to undertake the task 
of preparing a History of Putnam County, for the Publishers, 
W. W. and L. E. Preston. Upon arriving at the scene of his 
labors, the grandeur of the mountain scenery impressed his 
mind, with the contrast, so great, between the ''High Hills of 
the Highlands " and the ocean shore, which had been within 
his view from earliest childhood. A more extended acquaint- 
ance began to demonstrate, not only the difference in physi- 
cal, but in historical matters, and he found increasing interest 
in searching for the sources of information upon which the 
historian must rely. The little knowledge that is left of 
that aboriginal race whose origin is unknown and whose end 
is oblivion ; the coming of another race, and their conquest 
of the soil ; the settlements they made and the towns they 
founded ; with the endless diversity found in family history, 
and the change of events in political affairs ; the history of 
that family, who were once lords and owners of all -the land 
around ; the banishment and the death in a foreign land of 
some of their number ; all these soon became the subjects 
of search after knowledge, which became the more fascinat- 
ing from its being laborious. If the author has succeeded 
in throwing any light upon the darkness which hides the 
past; if he has recorded information wliich otherwise would 
have been lost, and if the researches he has made shall in- 
duce others to follow the path he has marked out, he will 
feel that his labors have not been in vain. 

It only remains to express our sincere thanks for the valu- 
able assistance received from those who have sympathized 
with the work, and especially to John De Witt Warner, Esq., 



for access to the papers of the Philipse family, without whicli 
the task of writing the History of the County would be at- 
tempted in vain. To his assistant, Mr. Henry S. Concklin, we 
are under obligations for many favors willingly rendered. 
The kindness and courtesy of Edward C. Weeks, Esq., County 
Clerk, will ever be a source of fond remembrance, and we 
wish to return thanks to our respected friend, Jeremiah W. 
Hazen, Esq., Sheriff of the County, for the facilities afforded 
for visiting all parts of the region whose history we have 
attempted to narrate. To render acknowledgment to Wil- 
liam J. Blake, Esq., whose History of Putnam County has 
preceded our own, is a pleasure as well as a duty. While 
to Mr. Philip H. Smith, the Historian of Dutchess County, 
we owe a debt of gratitude, for assistance in locating many 
ancient landmarks, the memory of which has passed away. 
We are equally indebted to Hon. Ambrose Ryder, who pre- 
pared the Bench and Bar Chapter, Dr. J. Q. Adams, the 
author of the Medical History, James A. Foshay, for the 
Chapter on Education, Gen. James Ryder, for the Chapter 
on Militia, and Hon. Thomas H. Reed, for preparing the 
map of the County. 

And also to Rev. W. S. Clapp, of Carmel, Hon. Saxton 
Smith, of Putnam Valley; Dr. N. W. Wheeler, of Patterson; 
Frank Wells, Esq., of Southeast; and Col. Thomas B. Arden, of 
Philipstown, for assistance on the History of their respective 
towns; and to Hon. Edward Wright, Hon. William Wood, 
Hon. George McCabe, Hon. Samuel H. Everett, District At- 
torney A. J. Miller, Charles H. Ludington, Esq., New York 
City, and the Clergy and Press of the County. 

With these words, the author lays down his pen, and con- 
cludes the task which has so long been a pleasure. He 
ventures to hope that his labor will be appreciated long after 
he is dust, and that whoever attempts a similar task, in 
the future, will accept his base although they may enlarge 
bis building. 

William S. Pelletre.\u. 



HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 



INTRODQCTORY CHAPTER. 

EARLY DISCOVERIES. 

THE discovery of America is the boundary between the 
Middle Ages and modern history. A numerous train of 
adventurers followed the track that the great Columbus had 
shown, and for awhile tlie governments of Spain and Portugal 
were the rulers of all that was known of the Western World. 
The Pope, in the plenitude of his then existing power, assumed 
the authority to divide all lands not yet discovered, between 
these nations, and greed for gold, which was the inspiring spirit 
of their adventure, soon led to the conquest of those lands 
which abounded with precious metals and promised boundless 
wealth to the conquerors in return for their exposure and toil. 
But the true nature of the newly discovered lands was not known 
till long years after. To the early Spanish voyagers, America 
was but a distant portion of the Indies, and the name of 
Indians, which was given to the inhabitants, took its origin 
from this error, which, though long since exploded, is still per- 
petuated in memory by the name which is likely to endure 
when the last relic of aboriginal life has vanished from the con- 
tinent. When at last it dawned i.ii)on the minds of Europeans 
that America was indeed a continent which interposed between 
them and the Indies, then it became the object of search to find 
a passage through, or around, the new found lands, which 
should be a shorter route to that far distant land. It was for 
this purpose that every bay and river along the Atlantic coast 
was carefully explored in the vain hope that some one of them 
might be the anxiously sought for passage to the far off South 
Sea, across which their vessels might sail to what was then the 
synonym of wealth, the Indies. 
1 



2 HISTORY Oi' PUTNAM COU>-TY. 

The power of Spain and Portugal precluded all attempts on 
the part of the northern nations to make discoveries in South 
America, or to .the south of Florida, the story of whose dis- 
covery by the heroic adventurer, in Ms vain quest for the 
fountain of youth, seems a fragment from the realms of fable. 
But expeditions from France and England soon found their way 
to the northern coast of the New World, and in 1524 Giovanni 
da Verazzano, a Florentine navigator in the service of Francis I, 
of France, made a voyage along the eastern coast of what are 
now the Southern and Middle States of the Union, and from 
the account which he gave it was long believed that he was the 
first to enter the harbor of New York, though the researches of 
modern historians have done mucli to throw doubt upon the 
claims of discovery which have been made for him. 'Whatever 
mav be the truth or falsity of the account attributed to him, 
it is certain that no results followed his discoveries, no colonies 
were planted, and for long years his voyage seems to have been 
forgotten. 

In the year 1497, Sebastian Cabot, a navigator in the service 
of England, sailed along the American coast from the 3Sth to 
the 58th parallel. This was the origin of the English claim to 
all that region of country, a claim which was destined in after 
years to be sustained, and the beneiits of which we as a nation 
now enjoy. 

It remains to state the circumstances under which the Dutch 
became the founders of the territory now comprising the State 
of New York. An association of merchants was established in 
Holland, having for its object the long cherished scheme of 
finding the northeast route to China. The "Company of 
Foreign Countries" had, in the year 1594, equipped three 
vessels, to make the search. After a long and tedious voyage 
in which they were beset with ice, they returned unsuccessful. 
In 1595, seven more vessels tried the same experiment, but with 
no better success. The next year the Council of Amsterdam 
undertook the enterprise and sent two vessels on the hopeless 
search. One of these was shipwrecked on the stormy coast of 
Nova Zenibla. and its pilot, the famed Barentz, found a watery 
grave, while the other returned, driven back as it were by the 
Spirit of the Storm, that seemed to guard the entrance to the 
Eastern World. 

A sudden change in the direction of these attempts was soon 



GENERAL IIISTORT. 3 

after made by an unlooked for circumstance. One Cornelius 
Houtman. "a shrewd Hollander," being in Portugal, took 
occasion to gain all the information he could from the navigators 
of that country respecting the Indies, and especially concerning 
the newly discovered route around the Cape of Good Hope. 
The authorities looking upon his inquiries with suspicion he 
was arrested and fined. As the only means by which he could 
regain his liberty was by the payment of a fine which was 
beyond his means, he wrote to several merchants in Amsterdam 
narrating the circumstances and proposing that if they would 
pay the fine he in return would communicate to them the 
information he had gained. This offer was accepted, and in 
1595 a fleet of four vessels sailed from the Texel, under the 
command of Houtman and others, bound on the southern route 
to the Indies. At the expiration of two years and four months 
they returned with their object accomplished, and richly laden 
with the products of the far ofl: land. The success of this 
enterprise led to the formation of other companies, and the 
rivalry between them was so great that in 1602 it was rendered 
necessary to unite them all, and hence the origin of the great 
" Dutch East India Company," which in after years astonished 
all Europe with its extensive power and dominion. 

A company had been formed in London for the purpose of 
exploring the Arctic for a new route to China. In accordance 
with this ijroject they contemplated three expeditions: one to 
the north, one to the northeast and the third to the northwest. 
To conduct these voyages they employed Henry Hudson, a 
name as enduring as any on the rolls of fame. In the employ 
of this company he made two voyages, both of which were 
imsuccessful. The comj^any declined to take any farther risks, 
and refused to equip the expedition for a third voyage. Hudson 
then went to Holland and after some effort enlisted their sym- 
pathies in favor of his scheme. The Amsterdam Directors 
finally succeeded in getting a majority of votes in its favor, and 
they fitted out a small vessel called the "Half Moon" and 
gave the command to Hudson. On the 6th of May, 1609, he 
sailed from the Texel wirh a crew of twenty, who were partly 
English and partly Dutch. After a long and tedious voyage he 
arrived upon our shores, and on the l-2th of September, entered 
the Buy of New York, as a new discoverer. 

" His bark the only ship. 

"Wliere a thousimd now are seen." 



4 HISTORY OF PUTJfAM COU>'TY. 

Continuing his voyage, he sailed for 150 miles up the river that 
bears his name, still hoping that the dream of long years was 
about to prove a reality, and he had discovered a new passage 
to the Southern Ocean. But the freshness of the water as he 
ascended toward its source soon convinced him that he was 
upon a river, and not upon a strait between two oceans, and his 
voyage completed, he returned to Holland. 

In 1610, another vessel was sent to trade with the natives, 
and in 1612 two more followed, and a small fort and a few 
biTildings were erected at the southern extremity of Manhattan 
Island, and the place was named New Amsterdam. In 1614, 
the States General of Holland granted a charter to the mer- 
chants engaged in these expeditions, and exclusive privileges 
were granted to them for a term of years. One Hendrick 
Christiansen had ascended the river and a trading post and fort 
were erected on the present site of Albany, which was named 
Fort Orange, and in 1621 the Dutch West India Company was 
established. The emigration to the new colony began in 1623. 
As might be expected, many of the people who were anxious to 
emigrate and seek new homes in the wilderness were not pos- 
sessed of the means necessary to enable them to accomplish their 
purpose, while persons of comfortable circumstances were 
under no inducement to leave the comforts of their native land. 
This led to the system of patroonships, by which wealthy men 
obtained grants of large extents of land and sent settlers at 
their own expense, who became their tenants, and paid a small, 
and sometimes merely nominal rent, for the lands which they 
occupied. At iirst settlements were only made near the two 
forts at New Amsterdam and Orange, but as the danger from 
the Indians decreased they became more widely extended. In 
1629, the company offered tracts to patroons who should found 
settlements of fifty or more adults, and several availed them- 
selves of this offer. 

Peter Minuit was appointed governor in 1626, and was recalled 
in 1633, and Wouter Van Twiller was appointed in his place. 
It was during his administration that the controversy between 
the English and Dutch concerning the jurisdiction commenced, 
the former claiming under the discoveries made by Cabot, and 
the grant which had been made by King James I, to the Ply- 
mouth Company. On the other side, the Dutch claimed full 
ownership as being the first to take possession and establish 



GEiNERAL HISTORY. 5 

colonies, and that the claim of England was null and void on 
the grounds that '■' Prescriptio sine possessione haud xaleat"' 
(Pre?cri])tion without possession is of little worth). In 1638, 
Van Twiller was succeeded, in the government of the colony, 
by William Kieft, but owing to hostilities which occurred with 
the Indians on Long Island and for which Kieft was censured, 
he was recalled, and was succeeded in 1647, by the famous 
Peter Stuyvesant, the greatest and the last of the Dutch gov- 
ernors. In the year 1664, King Charles II, of England, granted 
to his brother, James, Duke of York and Albany, all the 
territory between the Connecticut and the Delaware, including 
the entire Dutch possessions. To enforce this grant a fleet was 
sent under the command of Col. Richard Nicolls, who 
entered the harbor and demanded the surrender of the provinces. 
After much fruitless negotiation, the Articles of Surrender were 
signed by Governor Stuyvesant and the Dutch power ceased 
to exist. As all the inhabitants were confirmed in the full pos- 
session of their property, the transfer of the government made 
little change in their circumstances. The name New Amster- 
dam was changed to New York, and' Fort Orange to Albany, 
new laws were prescribed for the province, and courts were 
established. Although the change cannot be defended upon 
any abstract principles of right, yet it can be looked upon in 
no other light than as the making of the province, as the Nor- 
man Conquest was the making of England. 

Richard Nicolls. the first English governor, resigned in 1668 
and was succeeded by Col. Francis Lovelace, and New York 
was retaken by the Dutch in 1673, but reverted to the English 
in the following year. Sir Edmund Andros was commissioned 
governor, and proving a despotic ruler he became uripopular 
with the people and involved the province in difficulties with 
the neighboring colonies. He was recalled, and his successor, 
Thomas Dongan, took charge of the government in 1683, and 
the first Colonial Assembly was convened and many needed 
reforms were made. About this time Charles II died and was 
siicceeded on tlie throne by his brother, who reigned as James 
II. A bigoted and narrow-minded tyrant, he refused to confirm 
the privileges which had been granted when he was duke, pro- 
hibited the Assembly, forbade the establishment of the printing 
press, and filled the principal offices of the province with 
Roman Catholics. In 1689 King James was driven from the 



6 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

throne and William and Mary began their reign. Jacob Leisler, 
a prominent merchant of New York, seized the fort in New- 
York for the new sovereign and became for a time the actual 
governor. Upon the accession of Col. Sloughter, who was 
commissioned governor in 1689 and arrived in March, 1691, 
Leisler refused to surrender the fort at first. For this act he 
was tried for treason by a special commission, and through the 
influence of his enemies was condemned to death. The governor 
refused to sign the death warrant, but was persuaded to do so 
while intoxicated, and before he had recovered from his intoxi- 
cation the ill-fated victim was in eternity. Governor Sloughter 
died in July of the same year, and in 1692 Benjamin Fletcher 
arrived with a commission as governor and this brings us down 
to the period when the History of Putnam County may be said 
to begin. 

It remains to state the regulations and circumstances iinder 
which grants of land were made in the new province of New 
York. When the Dutch settlers first began to found their set- 
tlements, "'The land was all before them where to choose." 
The low lands that reminded them of their native Holland, and 
whose rich fertility promised abundant harvest with easy 
tillage, were the first to be occupied and here they established 
their ^'■howeries'" or farms. While the early settlers of New 
England invariably settled in villages where the inhabitants 
could be a mutual protection, the Dutch " Boers,'''' or farmers, 
seemed possessed with a desire to reside, each on his own 
plantation and remote from the rest, and surrounded only by 
his family and dependents. This principle of separation was 
continued even after death, and it was the almost universal cus- 
tom among the Dutch settlers, and their descendants for many 
generations, for each family to have a private burying ground, 
and to be buried on their own land. These little cemeteries, 
overgrown with weeds and briars, and in a condition of utter 
neglect, are very frequently to be found on the old farms of the 
Dutch settlements, long since j^assed into the hands of strangers, 
and the memory of the early inhabitants only known by tra- 
dition, and the few names inscribed upon tombstones fast 
crumbling to decay. 

Both under the Dutch and English n;le, the first step to be 
taken when a new settlement was to be established, was to 
obtain a license from the governor to purchase the land from 



GENERAL HISTORY. 7 

the tribe of Indians, who claimed to be the owners. This license 
having been duly procured, an interview was obtained with the 
sachems of the tribe, and the purchase was effected in exchange 
for various articles of European manufacture, seldom amount- 
ing in value to more than a hundred dollars, and generally in- 
cluding a little rum. When the license and purchase were duly 
entered in the office of the secretary of the colony, a patent, 
issued by the governor, with his signature and the seal of the 
province affixed, was delivered to the owner and recorded at 
length in the secretary's office. The original patents were 
written upon parchment in the elegant hand-writing of a pro- 
fessional copyist, and were of great length, with all the repeti- 
tion and verbiage so commonly used in conveyances of land 
under English law, while the seal attached, without which they 
were of no value, was frequently a cake of wax, several inches 
in diameter and of proportionate thickness, impressed with the 
arms of the province. Though many of these original docu- 
ments have been lost and only exist among the records in 
Albany, yet some are in existence and in a fine state of 
preservation. 

The obtaining of grants of land was not unfrequently con- 
nected with gross abuses. The boundaries were generally 
stated in an indefinite manner, the extent of one patent very 
often trespassed upon the bounds of another, and the result 
was a tract of "disputed lands," a fruitful cause of litigation, 
generally settled by commissioners appointed for that purpose. 
The large tracts of land engrossed by single individuals ren- 
dered it necessary to pass a law limiting the amount to be pur- 
chased by any one person. This, however, was often evaded 
by several persons combining in the purchase, and as soon as 
the patent was obtained, selling out their shares to some of the 
number, the arrangement having been made in advance. Prior 
to the time when the lands now included within the limits of 
Putnam county were purchased, many tracts of land had been 
taken up and settlements established on both sides of the Hud- 
son River. Farms or "Boweries" had been laid out on Man- 
hattan Island, at the earliest period. In 1639, Jonas Bronck 
became the owner of a tract in "Westchester county, which 
derived its name (Bronck' s land) from him, and in after years 
was known as Morrisania. In 1646, Adrian Van der Donk pur- 
chased the land now included in the city of Yonkers and part 



8 HISTORY OF PUTNAM C0U:N'TY. 

of New York city adjoinino;, and established the colony of 
Colendonk, which was afterward purchased by Frederick 
Philipse and was patented to him as the Manor of Philipsburg, 
in 1693. 

On the west side of the river a colony had been founded at a 
very early date near Tappan. This was destroyed by the 
Indians and abandoned. In 1686, the Oraugetown Patent was 
granted, the most southerly part of Rockland county. At 
Nyack a settlement was first made by Class Jans Van Pur- 
marent, and his son, Cornelius Classen, obtained a patent for 
the land in 1671. The land at Haverstraw was purchased, in 
1666, by Balthazar De Hart and his brother. Jacobus. The 
o-reater part of Clarkstown, in Rockland county, was embraced 
in the patent of Kakiat, granted to Daniel Honan and Michael 
Howden, in 1696. The true boundary between New York and 
New Jersey was not settled until a later date, and as late as 
1671 it was thought that the bounds of the latter extended as 
far north as Stony Point. 

On the east side of the Hudson, lands by Croton River were 
sold to Stephanus Van Cortlandt in 16S3. Ryck Abrahamsen 
Lent purchased the lands now the southern part of the village 
of Peekskill in 1685. The northern part of Peekskill was 
granted to one Hugh McGregory in 1691, while to the north of 
this and extending to the Highlands was a tract patented to 
John Knight, in 1686, and sold by him to Gov. Thomas Dongan, 
in 1687, and with the other purchases were combined in the 
great patent known as the Manor of Cortlandt, granted to 
Stephanus Yan Cortlandt, in 1697. As the north line of 
the Manor of Cortlandt was the south boundary of the tract 
now included in Putnam county, the description is given as 
found in the original patent, " Running northerly along Hud- 
son River as the river runs, unto the north side of a high 
hill called Anthony's Nose, to a red cedar tree, which marks 
the southermost bounds of the land now in the tenure and 
occupation of Mr. Adolph Philipse, and from the said red 
cedar tree, another due easterly line running into the woods 
twenty English miles." The " twenty English miles " extended 
to the boundary between the colonies of New York and Con- 
necticut as established. 

On the 17th of October, 1685, a patent was granted to Francis 
Rumbout, Jacobus Kipp and Stephanus Van Cortlandt for 



GENERAL HISTORY. 9 

"All that tract of land situated on the east side of Hudson 
river, beginning from the south side of a creek called the Fish 
Kill, and by the Indians, Mateawam, thence north along the 
river 500 rods beyond the great Wappink Kill, thence into the 
woods four hours going, sixteen English miles, keeping 500 rods 
north of Wappinger's creek. Also from the said Fish Kill or 
the creek called Mateawam, along said Fish Kill into the woods 
at the foot of the High Hills including all the reed or low lands 
at the south side of said creek, with an easterly line four hours 
going, sixteen English miles, thence to the north side of Wap- 
pinger's creek as aforesaid."' This tract, which is generally 
called the Rumbout Patent, was originally purchased by Fran- 
cis Rumbout, Jacobus Kipp and Guillian Ver Planck. The last 
agreed to sell his share to Stephanus Van Cortlandt but died 
before making the transfer. His widow and executrix married 
Jacobus Kipp, and they and Francis Rumbout sold one third 
to Van Cortlandt and the patent was granted to them as stated 
above. 

On the 22d of April, 1697, a patent was granted to Henry 
Beekman for "All that tract of land in Dutchess County, 
beginning at the north side of the Highlands, at the east of the 
lands of Col. Van Cortlandt and Company,' so far as the line 
between the Province of New York and the colony of Con- 
necticut extends." These two ti'acts and the Manor of Cort- 
landt became afterward the boundaries on the north and south, 
of what is now Putnam county. It is not strange that the 
range of lofty mountains, which presented no attractions for 
the cultivator of the soil, should have remained unpurchased 
while there were fertile lands to be procured, but the time Avas 
soon to come for a man who should call the rugged mountains 
his own. 

'Tlie Ruiubout Patent. 



CHAPTER 11. 

ADOLPH PHILIPSE AND HIS PATENT. 

AS stated in the previous chapter, the first step usnalJy taken 
by a person who wished to procure a grant of land from 
the colonial government, was to obtain from the governor a 
license to purchase the desired tract from the native occupants 
of the soil. The first persons who thus made application for 
the land now embraced in Putnam county were Lambert Dor- 
landt and Jan Sybrant (Seberinge). Of these two men we have 
very little knowledge except that they were among the emigrants 
who came from Holland, in the early days of New Amsterdam. 
From the New York Colonial Records it appears that on De- 
cember 2d, 1680, Lambert Dorlandt had a tract of 130 acres on 
the north side of Staten Island, while as early as 1669 Jan Sy- 
brantse was indebted one bushel of wheat for quit rent for his 
plantation in the same locality. They were of the ordinary 
rank of Dutch burghers, who held no official station and whose 
names would hove long since ceased to be in remembrance, ex- 
cept as incidentally mentioned in the early records. These nif n 
obtained from the Indians a deed for a tract of land which em- 
braced the western part of the present county of Putnam, in 
1691, having first obtained the license of the governor for that 
purpose. Of this license the following is a copy. 
'•By the Commander in Chief e. 

" Whereas John Rooloofe Sybran hath Desired ye liberty and 
Lycense to Purchase of the Indian Natives A Certain tract or 
parcell of Land lying and being on Hudson river in the high 
lands at a place called the Butterberge on the east side of the 
river. These may Certifie that the said John Roeloffe Sybran 
hath hereby Liberty and Lycense Granted him, to purchase the 
said lands before menconed, Provided the same be not taken up 



GENERAL HISTORY. 11 

or appropriated by any other, and the purchase to be made on 
or before the Second day of June and returned into the Sectys 
office in order for obtaining a Patent which is to be taken out 
before the first day of July or else this license to be voyd and 
of none effect. For which this Shall be your warant. Gfiven 
under my hand and seal att ffort James, the 26 October 1687. 

" Atho. Brockholtz." 

" Passed ye Secretai-ys office 
John Knight Secretary. 

" Entered June 15 1697." 

In accordance with this license, Sybrant and his partner, Dor- 
landt, obtained the following Indian deed. 

" Know All Men by these Presents that Avee Anguikenagg 
Raentagg Wassawrawigh Mannakahorint, Moakenap, Weawei- 
noww, Awanganugh, for and in consideration of a competent 
som of current money, of this Province to us in hand paid by 
Lambard Dorland and Jean Seabrant, at or before the ensealing 
and delivery of these presents, the Receipt whereof we and each 
of us doeth hereby acknowledge to have received, and to be 
therewith fully satisfied and contented, and of and from ye same 
and every part and Parcell thereof doth hereby fully freely and 
absolutely acquit, exonerate and discharge the said Lambard 
Dorlandt and John Seabrant their heirs executors and Admin- 
istrators and every of them, firmly by these presents, Doth 
grant and sell unto the said Lambard Dorlandt and John Sea- 
brant their heirs and assigns, all that Certain Tract or Parcell 
of Land lying and being in ye highlands on the east side of 
Hudson river, beginning at the north side of a Certain hill called 
Anthonys nose, by a redd Seader marked tree, and along said 
river northerly to the land belonging to Stephanus Van Cort- 
landt and the heirs of Francis Rombout and Guillian Ver 
Planck and eastwards in the woods as farr along the said lands 
of Steph. Cortlandt and Co. aforesaid to a marked tree; together 
with Pollepels Island, and all ye woods, underwoods, trees, 
timber, meadows, marshes, lowlands, rivers, rivolets, swamps, 
thereto belonging or in any ways appertaining. To Have and to 
Hold unto the said Lambard Dorlandt and Jno. Seabrant, their 
heirs and assigns for ever. To the only proper use benefit and 
behoofe to them. the said Lambard Dorlandt and Jno. Seabrant, 
their heirs and assigns forever. Witness our hands and seals 



12 HISTORY OF PUTNAM C0U:NTT. 

att New York this 15th, day of July, in the 3d year of their 
Majesties Reigne and in the yeare of our Lord 1691. 
Signed sealed and delivered The mark of X Anguiken'agg-. 

in the presence of The mark of X Raentagg. 

S. Van Cortlandt. The mark of X Wassawrawigh. 

NicHO. Reynells. The mark of X Mannakahorint. 

The mark X of Clowes. The mark of X Moakenap. 

the Indian Interpreter The mark of X Weaweinoww. 

and witness to these The mark of X Awanganugh. 

presents. 

"Memorandum, that the payment and satisfaction for the 
above land is made in my presence to their full content. Wit- 
ness my hand the 15th day of July 1691, in New Yorke. 

" S. Van Cortlandt." 

The purchasers of this tract, Dorlandt and Sybrant, did not 
obtain a patent for the land from the governor but transferred 
and sold all their right to the premises to Adolph Philipse, a 
wealthy merchant of New York, in 1697, as will appear by the 
following: 

deed to adolph philipse. 

"This Indenture made the 16th day of June Anno Domini 
1697 in the ninth year of the Reigne of our Sovereign Lord 
William the third by the Grace of God King of England Scot- 
land France and Ireland Defender of the faith and Between 
Lambert Dorlandt and Jan Seabrandt of the one party, and 
Adolph Philipse of the City of New York merchant, of the 
other party, Witnesseth, that whereas Jan Sybrean did obtain 
lycense from Anthony Brockholls Esq. Commander then in 
Chiefe of this Province, for the purchasing vacant lands on the 
east side of the Hudson river, at the Highlands, by virtue of 
which lycense he the said Jan Sybran, together with the said 
Lambert Dorlandt his partner, did purchase from the native In- 
dian Proprietors all that vacant and unimproved land on the 
east side of the Hudson river called the Highlands, from the 
north side of the hill called Antonios Nose to the land of Col. 
Stephen Cortlandt and Company, with Pollopels island, and 
backwards into the woods so farr as the land of Col. Cortlandt 
and Company extendeth, and have paid and satisfied for the 
same, but have not yet obtained any Patent for the same. Now 






by Wappinaer Iiiaiaus 

■ isth laai. 









t-*.- 



,y?«->^ ^^'^rr^ .>~^/£~i::>^i, ^..^n. ^..^^A^^ 



"-r-- ^yi -^—j 




^«i^i:»~'i^^^;|,'^^ 






GENERAL HISTORY. 13 

the said Jan Sybran and Lambert Dorlandt for a valuable con- 
sideration to them in hand paid by the said Adolph Philipse, the 
receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged and themselves there- 
with to be fully contented and paid: have granted bargained 
and sold, and by these presents, do grant bargain and sell unto 
the said Adolph Philipse all the said tract of land Island and 
premises together with all their right title and interest property, 
claime and demand, thereunto, or to any part or parcel of the 
said tract, of land, Island and premises. To have and to hold 
the said tract of land. Island and premises limited and bounded 
as aforesaid, unto the said Adolph Philipse his heirs and as- 
signs, to the sole and only proper use benefit and behoof of him 
the said Adolph Philipse his heirs and assigns forever. And 
for the further confirmation and assurance of the said tract of 
land, Island and premises they do deliver, up unto the said 
Adolph Philipse the said lycense and deed of sale from the In- 
dians for the said tract of land Island and premises, at the time 
of ensealing and delivery of these presents, and do likewise 
testify their consent and desire by the ensealing and delivery of 
these presents that a Patent be granted under the seal of the 
Province for the said tract of land. Island and premises to hold 
to the said Adolph Philipse his heirs and assigns forever. In 
witness whereof the partyes to these presents their hands and 
seals have interchaugably sett, the day and year first above 
written. 

"Sealed and d. d. in Jax SEBEKi>rGE, 

ye presence of us Lambert Dorlandt." 

Tho. YounXt, 
David Jamison. 

In this way began the ownership of the famous family whose 
name and deeds form so important a portion of the annals of 
the county and State. Adolph Philijise having thus acquired 
the title from the original owners, proceeded at once to take 
the necessary steps for obtaining a patent for his lands, and 
presented in due form the following petition to Benjamin 
Fletcher, who was then governor of the province of New York. 

"To His Excellency Benjamin Fletcher, Captain Irenerall, 
and Governor in Chief of the Province of Xew York. 

"The huml)le petition of Mr. Adolph Philipse Sheweth, 
That for a valuable consideration, your Excellency's petitioner 



14 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

has purchased from Jan Sybrante and Lambert Dorlandt, a cer- 
tain tract of vacant land on the East side of Hudson river, in 
Dutchess County, beginning at a marked cedar on the north 
side of that Hill called Anthony's Nose, and stretching along 
said river upward to the land of Col. Cortlandt and Company, 
and stretching backwards from the said river into the woods as 
farr as the land of Col. Cortlandt and Company aforesaid, in- 
cluding Pollepells island, which land became theirs by a ly- 
cense and deed but was never yet patented. Your Excellency's 
petitioner being desirous to make some improvements thereon, 
and especially the backward parts from the mountains, there- 
fore hereby prays your Excellency to grant him a Patent for 
the same and that the bounds * * may be the dividing line 
between * * * under such moderate quit rent * * * *, 
and your Excellency's Petitioner shall as in duty bound ever 
pray. 




In accordance with this petition Gov. Fletcher granted the 
following: 

PATENT TO ADOLPH PHILIPSE. 

"William the Thikd by the Grace of God King of Eng- 
land Scotland France and Ireland, Defender of the faith &c. 
To all to whom these Presents shall come sendeth Greeting 
Whereas our Loving Subject Adolph Philips of our City of 
New Yorke Merchant hath by his peticon presented unto our 
trusty and well beloved Benjamin Fletcher our Captain General 
and Governor in Chiefe of our Province of New Yorke and Ter- 
ritoryes Depending thereon in America &c. prayed our grant 
and confirmacon of a certain tract of land in our Dutchess 
county, scituate lyeing and being in the Highlands on the East 
side of Hudson's River beginning at a certain Eed Cedar Tree 
marked on the North side of the Hill commonly called An- 
thonys Nose, which is Likewise the North Bounds of Collonell 
Stevanus Cortlandts land or his Manour of Cortlandt, and from 
thence bounded by the said Hudson's River as the said river 
runs notherly until it come to the Creek River or Run of Water 




rilr-^"- "TV-c: P = 



GENERAL HISTORY. 15 

commonly called and known by the name of C-rreat fishkill to 
the Northward and above the said Highlands, which is like- 
wise the Southward bounds of another Tract of Land belonging 
to the said Coll Stephanus Cortlandt and Company, and so 
Easterly along the said Coll Cortland ts line and the South 
bounds of Coll Henry Beeckman until it comes twenty Miles, 
or until the Division or Petition Line between our Colony of 
Connecticutt and our said Province, and Easterly by the said 
Division Line, being bounded Northerly and Southerly by East 
and West Lines unto the said Division line between our said 
Collony of Connecticutt and this our Province aforesaid, the 
whole being bounded Westward by the said Hudson River, 
Northward by the land of Coll Cortlandt and Company and the 
land of Coll Beckman, Eastward by the Partition line between 
our Colony of Connecticutt and this our Province, and 
Southerly by the Mannour of Courtlandt to the land of the said 
Coll Cortlandt, including therein a certaine Island at the North 
side of the said Highlands called Pollepells Island; which rea- 
sonable request we being willing to Grant. Know Yee that of 
our special Grace Certain Knowledge and meere mocon We 
have given granted ratifyed and confirmed, and by these Pres- 
ents Do for us our Heirs and Successors Give Grant Ratify and 
Confirme unto the said Adolph Philips, all the aforerecited 
Certaine Tract of Land and Island within the Limits and bounds 
aforesaid, together with all and singular the Woods underwoods 
Trees Timber Hills Mountains Valleys Rocks Quarrys Marshes 
Swamps Rivers Runs Rivoletts Waters Watercourses Pools 
Ponds Lakes Fountains Streams Meadows Fresh and Salt, 
Mines Mineralls (Silver and Gold Mines excepted) fishing fowl- 
ing hunting and hawking and all other Royaltyes Rights Mem- 
bers Benefites Profites advantages Commodityes Privileges 
Hereditaments and appurtenances whatsoever, unto the afore- 
recited certaine Tract of Land and Island within the limites and 
bounds aforesaid together with all and singular the Woods un- 
derwoods Trees Timber Hills Mountains Yalleys Rocks Quarrys 
Marshes Swamps Rivers Runs Rivoletts Waters Water Courses 
Pools Ponds Lakes Fountains Streams Meadows Fresh and Salt, 
Mines Mineralls (Silver and Gold Mines excepted) fishing fowling 
hunting and hawking and all other Royaltyes Rights Members 
Benefices Profites Advantages Commodityes Privileges Heredi- 
taments and appurtenances whatsoever unto the aforerecited 



16 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

Certaine Tract of Land and Island within tlie Limites and 
bounds aforesaid belonging or in any wayes appertaining unto 
the said Adolph Philips his heirs and assigns forever. To be 
holden of us our Heirs and Successors in Free and Common 
Soccage as of our Mannour of East Greenwich in our County 
of Kent within our Realm e of England Yielding rendering and 
paying therefore yearly and every Year unto us our Heirs and 
Successors forever at our City of New Yorke on the Feast day 
of the Annunciation of our blessed Virgin Mary the yearly 
rent of twenty shillings currant money of our said province in 
Lieu and stead^^of all other Rents Services Dues Datys and 
Demands whatsoever for the said Tract of land Island and 
Premises. 

"In Testimony whereof we have caused the Great Seal of our 
Province to be hereunto affixed, Witness our Trusty and well 
beloved Benjamin Fletcher our Captaine Generall and Govern- 
our in Chief of our Province of New York and Territoryes De- 
pending thereon in America and Vice Admirall of the same our 
Lieut: and Commander in Chiefe of the Militia and of all the 
forces by sea and land within our Colony of Connecticutt and 
of all the forces and places of Strength within the same in 
Council at our fort in New Yorke the Seventeenth Day of June 
in the Ninth Year of our Reigne Annoq Dm 1697. Ben. 
Fletcher by his Excellencys Command 

"David Jamison, 
D' Secr'y." 

It will be seen that the Indian deed to Dorlandt and Sybrant 
and the subsequent transfers only conveyed the land extending 
back from the Hudson River to a marked tree on the line of the 
Rupibout Patent or " Land of Cortlandt and Company,"' while 
the patent of Gov. Fletcher conveyed all the land between the 
river and the boundarj" line between New York and Connecti- 
cut. To confirm his title ro this additional tract Adolph Philipse 
obtained a new Indian deed, in 1702, which embraced the fol- 
lowing extent: * 

INDIAN RELKASE TO ADOLPH PHILIPSE. 

"Know all men by these presents that wee Sipoworak. Sow- 
wess. Gacliqnaran, Cowenhahum, Hingham, Meconop, Cam- 
atacht, ]\Iacligowwas, AVassawawogh, Perapowwes, Kochhe- 



... 






T ■] 



GENKRAL HISTOKY. 17 

nond, Wapatough, Wliannawhau, Werachtacus, Petawachpiet 
and Metapscht, native Indians and Proprietors of sundry Tracts 
of land in Dutchess County within the Province of New York, 
in America. For and in consideration of a competent sum of 
good and lawfuU money of the said Province of New York to 
us in hand paid by Adolph Philipse of the City of New York, 
merchant at or before the sealing and delivery hereof, have 
granted bargained, sold, remised, released and for ever quit- 
claimed unto the said Adolph Philipse in his full and peaceable 
possession, and seizen being, and to his heirs and assigns for 
ever. All such right, estate, title, interest property claim or 
demand, as we the said Indians, now have, had, or ought to 
have, in or to all that our certain tract of land in Dutchess 
County, in the Province of New York aforesaid, situate lying 
and being in the high lands on the east side of the Hudson 
river, beginning at a Certain Eed Cedar tree marked, on the 
north side of the hill commonly called Anthony's nose, which 
is likewise the north bounds of Col. Stephanus Van Cortlandts ' 
land, or his Manor of Cortlandt, and from thence bounded by 
the said Hudson river as the said river runs, northerly until it 
comes to the Creeke river or run of water commonly called and 
known by the name of the great fish kill, to the northward and 
above the said higli lands, which is likewise the southward 
bounds of another Tract of Land belonging unto the said Col. 
Stephanus Yan Cortlandt and Company, and see easterly along 
the said Coll. Cortlandts line and the south bounds of Coll. 
Henry Beekman until it comes twenty miles or unto the Division 
or partition line between the Colony of Connecticut and the 
said Province of New York, and easterly by the said Division 
line: Being bounded Northerly and southerly by east and west 
lines, unto the said Division line. The whole being bounded 
westward by Hudsons river, northward by the lands of Coll. 
Cortlandt and Company and the land of Coll. Beekman, and 
eastward by the partition line between the Colony of Connecti- 
cut and the Province of New York, and southerly by the Manor 
of Cortlandt. Including therein a certain Island at the north 
side of the higli lands called Pollepels Island. With all the 
swamps, woods, underwoods, marshes, streams, mines, minerals, 
hawking, hunting, fishing and fowling and all other appurte- 
nances to the said tract belonging. To Have and To Hold, to 
the aforesaid Adolph Philipse his heirs and assigns forever, so 



18 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COU^^-TV. 

that neither wee the said Indian natives and Proprietors, nor 
our heirs, nor any other person for us, may hereafter have any 
claim challenge or demand, to the premises or any part thereof. 
In witness whereof we the said Natives Indian Proprietors have 
hereunto put our hands and seals in New York the thirteenth 
day of August 1702, Annoque Regni Annae nunc Angl &c. 
primo. 

" The mark of X Gachquaran, 
mark The mark of X CowEiN'HAHrM, 

The X of The mark of X Hengham, 

Wecopop. The mark of X Shawiss, 

The mark of X Sipowerack, 
The mark of X Cramatachet, 
The mark of X WASSAWAAToan. 

"Sealed and delivered by the within named Gachquaran, 
Cowenhahum, Hengham, Shawiss, Siporewak, Cramatacht, 
Wassawawogh and Wecopap, in the presence of 

" J. Vajst Cortlandt, 
Will. Sharpass, 
Philip Van Cortlandt, 
Alandiana Bayard, 
The mark X of Mr. Hacpe ye Indian, 
The mark X of Amehevend, 
The mark X of Anackhean." 
Such was the completion of the title of Adolph Philipse. 
The originals of the Indian deed to Sybrant and Dorlandt, their 
transfer to Adolph Philipse, the license of Gov. Brockholtz, 
and the second Indian deed of 1702, are among the papers of 
the Philipse family, while the petition and the patent are 
among the records in the office of the secretary of State. 

Adolph Philipse, the patentee, continued in the full posses- 
sion of his Highland Patent till the time of his death, which 
occurred in the latter part of the year 1749. He died intestate, 
and as he never married, his estate descended to his nephew, 
Frederick Philipse, as lieirat-law and next of kin. The new 
owner did not long enjoy his possession, but died in 1751. His 
will, which bears the date of June 6th, 1751, is recorded in the 
surrogate's office of the city of New York. As the testator 
left a large estate not only in New York, but in Westchester 
countv, as well as the Highland Patent inherited from his 



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GENERAL HISTORY. 19 

uncle, his will is written at great length, but the only iDortion of 
it which relates to his possessions in this county is the follow- 
ing item: 

•' Whereas, there is a large tract of land situate and being on 
the east side of the Hudson Eiver, which by letters patent 
bearing date on or about the seventeenth day of June, in the 
year of our Lord, one thousand six hundred and ninety-seven, 
was granted unto my said uncle Adolph Philipse and his heirs, 
butted and bounded as therein mentioned, reference being 
thereunto had which said tract of land is commonly called and 
known by the name of "'Mr. Philipse' s Upper or Highland 
Patent " and which said tract of land and the estate right and 
title in and to the same is now belonging to and vested in me 
by his death as heir-at-law to him. Wherefore, I do devise and 
bequeath that said large tract of land with the appurtenances 
in manner following: — To my son Philip Philipse and the heirs 
of his body forever, one quarter part thereof ; to my said 
daughter Susannah, now the wife of Mr. Beverly Robinson and 
to the heirs of her body forever, one other quarter part thereof; 
unto my second daughter Mary Philipse and to the heirs of her 
body forever, one other quarter part thereof ; and the other 
quarter part thereof unto my youngest daughter Margrett 
Philipse and to the heirs of her body forever; and if my said 
son Philip Philipse, or any or either of my said daughters shall 
happen to die without issue, then and in such case the quarter 
part or parts hereby devised to him, her, or those of them so 
dying without issue, I will, devise and bequeath unto the sur- 
vivors of them, equally to be divided between them to the 
respective heirs of their bodies forever. And if three of them 
should happen to die without issue, then I will, devise and 
bequeath the three quarter parts of those so dying without issue 
unto the survivor of them, and to the heirs of the body of such 
survivor forever." 



CHAPTER III. 

THE PHILIPSE FAMILY. 

THE family of which Adolph Philipse, the patentee, was so 
illustrious a member, and which has from the earliest 
time to the present day been so closely identified with the his- 
tory of this region of country, most justly merits an extended 
notice as the name is an inseparable portion of the annals of the 
county and State as well. 

The ancestor of this family was Vrederick Flypsen, who was, 
according to one account, a native of Bolswaert, in Friesland, 
where he was born in 1626. There is abundant evidence that 
his ancestry were among the nobility of Bohemia, but a claim 
to a truer nobility than kings can bestow is found in the fact 
that they were among the friends and supporters of the Re- 
formed Religion and adherents of the renowned John Huss and 
Jerome of Prague, and shared in enduring the persecutions 
which have made their names illustrious as champions of relig- 
ious freedom. 

For their adherence to the cause of Reformation, the family 
were compelled to flee from Bohemia, and they found in Hol- 
land, as did thousands after them, a home of peace and secur- 
ity. Compelled to leave their property, the family found them- 
selves in a strange land and in the possession of very limited 
means. A manuscript statement written by John Jay, and 
worthy of the respect due to anything emanating from the hon- 
ored chief justice, is authority for the statement that the 
founder of this family was born in Bohemia. 

" The first ancestor of this family was Frederick Flypsen, 
and he was a native of Bohemia, where his family being Protes- 
tants were persecuted. His mother becoming a widow was com- 
pelleil to quit Bohemia with him and her other children. She 
tied to Hollaud with what little property she could save from 



GENERAL HISTORY. 21 

the wreck of their estate. The amount of this little not permit- 
ting her to provide better for Frederick she bound him to a car- 
penter, and he became an excellent workman. He emigrated to 
New York, which was under the Dutch, but in what year I am 
not informed." 

A tradition of the family is that he came with Peter Stuyve- 
sant, and if this be the case, he must have arrived in 1647. It 
is certain that he was in New Netherlandin 1653, as at that time 
he was appointed appraiser of certain property in New Amster- 
dam. The surest proof of the nobility of his ancestry is the 
fact that although he came to this country without any of the 
advantages of fortune, he was recognized as the social equal of 
the highest dignitaries of the colony, and the favor and as- 
sistance which he received from them, were doubtless in great 
part the means which in the end made him the richest man of his 
day. His first wife, Margaret, was the daughter of Adoph 
Hardenbrook, who came from Holland and settled at Bergen. 
She married Rudolphus De Vries, a merchant of New Amster- 
dam, in 1659. They had one daughter, who was baptized by the 
name of Maria, October 3d, 1660. Rudolphus De Vries died in 
1661, leaving a considerable estate, which descended to his 
widow and child. In October, 1662, bans of marriage between 
Frederick Philipse and Margaret Hardenbrook were published, 
and the Court of Orphan Masters, of New Amsterdam, sum- 
moned her before them to render an inventory of her child's 
paternal inheritance. This she declared her inability to do, 
probably on account of the commercial quality of the assets, 
and the court received the ante-nuptial contract between her 
and Frederick Philipse, in lieu of inventory, in consideration 
of its containing an agreement on his part to adopt the child of 
Rudolphus De Vries, and bequeath unto her half of his estate, 
unless he had children of his own, in which case he would give 
her an equal share with them. The Dutch law permitted adoj)- 
tion, and also the limitation of successory estates by marriage 
contracts, and the child thus became the child of Frederick 
Philipse upon the occasion of his marriage, which took place, 
as recorded, in December following. It has been stated that she 
was baptized under the name of Maria. That is supposed by 
some to have been an error on the part of the registrar. It is 
possible that her name may have been changed at the time of 
her adoption: however this maybe, it is certain that she ever 



22 HISTORY OF PUTINAM COUNTY. 

after bore the name of Eva Philipse and is thus named in her 
adopted father's will. 

By this marriage he became entitled to a community of prop- 
erty with his wife, but she did not relinquish the sole manage- 
ment of her estate, for which she seemed well fitted by nature. 
On the contrary she continued to conduct the business of her 
late husband, went repeatedly to Holland in her own ships, as 
supercargo, and bought goods and traded on her own account. 
By her fortune, enterprise and thrift, as well as his own exer- 
tions, Frederick Philipse soon became one of the richest men in 
the colony. His property was valued, in 1674, by commission- 
ers appointed by the governor, at 80,000 guilders, a sum which 
was large for those days, but small in comparison to the wealth 
he afterward accumulated. After the death of his wife, which 
occurred about 1690, his business enterprises became still more 
extensive. He was one of the most extensive traders with the 
Five Indian Nations at Albany, sent ships to both the East and 
West Indies, imported slaves from Africa, and it is intimated by 
his enemies that he increased his gains by dealings with the 
jDirates at Madagascar. It was generally believed that his profits 
were much enhanced by his connection with the government, 
and his intimacy with the governors, by which he obtained ad- 
vantages not granted to others. In official and political affairs, 
he was not less ijrominent than in his commercial transactions. 
He was a member of Council under all the governors, from Ed- 
mund Andros to the Earl of Bellomont, embracing a period of 
twenty years, with the brief exception of the rule of Jacob 
Leisler, whose authority he resisted for a while, but whom he 
afterwards recognized as the governor de facto. He was in liigh 
favor with Governor Slough ter and his successor Governor 
Fletcher, through whose favor both he and his son, Adolph, ob- 
tained large grants of land, the former gaining a large extent of 
territory in Westchester countj', embracing the lands between 
the Hudson and the Bronx River, and extending from the 
Croton River to Kings Bridge, and afterwards established as the 
Manor of Philipsburg: and the latter obtaining the Highland 
Patent which has been described in preceding pages. 

In 1698, he resigned his seat in the Council, giving as a reason 
his advanced age, but apparently to escape removal, which 
seemed probable upon the accession of the Earl of Bellomont to 
the position of governor. 



GENERAL HISTORY. 23 

In 1693, Mr. Philipse man-ied Catharine, daughter of Oloff 
Stevense Van Cortlandt, and widow of John Dervall. There 
were no children from this second marriage. The notice of his 
death is thus recorded, by his widow, in the family Bible. 

" Anno 1702 theBth of November, Saturday night at 10 o'clock 
my husband Frederick Philipse died and lies buried in the 
church yard in the Manor named Philipsburg." 

On his Manor of Phili];)sburg, he ruled in true baronial style. 
Two manor houses stood upon the estate, one at the "Upper 
Mills" above Tarrytown, and the other, now a venerated relic 
of the past, is the present city hall of Yonkers. Thus passed 
away a man who was, during his long life, one of the most 
prominent i)ersonages of his time, and his earthly remains rest 
in the well known Sleepy Hollow Cemetery, at Tarrytown, hal- 
lowed as the last resting place of Washington Irving. Fred- 
erick Philipse had five children: Eva, his adopted daughter, 
who married Jacobus Van Cortlandt, and whose descendants 
are known as the Van Cortlandts of Yonkers; Philip, born in 
1663 and baptized March 18th, 1664; Adolph, baptized Novem- 
ber loth, 1665: Anatje (Anna), baptized November 27th, 1667, 
married Philip French'; and one child, Rumbout, baptized Jan- 
uary 9th 1670, died in early infancy. 

P'hilip Philipse, the eldest son, was a youth of delicate con- 
stitution. His father sent him to Barbadoes, in the West Indies, 
to look after a plantation and while there he married, in 1697, 
Maria Sparks, daughter of the governor of the island. His wife 
died soon after the birth of their only child, Frederick, Oct. 
17th, 169S. Her husband did not long survive but died in 1700. 

WILL OF FREDERICK PHILIPSE. 

" I Frederick FJipse of ye City of New York Merchant, be- 
ing in health of body and of sound mind and perfect memory, 
thanks be to Almighty God, doe make and declare this to be 
my last Will and Testament, Revoking and annulling all former 
Wills and Testaments by me made either by word or writing. 

" First I surrender and bequeath my soul into ye merciful 
hands of ye Infinite God who gave it, and I order my body to 

' Philip French came from Kelsale, Suflfolk. England. He died in 1707, leaving 
a son Philip (who married Susannah Brockholst), and fonr daughters: Anne, 
wife of David Van Home; Susannah, wife of Hon. William Livingston; Eliza- 
beth, wife of David Clarkson: and Marv, wife of Hon. ^Ym. Browne. •• of Bev- 
erlv. New England." 



24 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

be interred at my Burrial place at ye Upper Mills', with such 
charges and in such decent manner as to my Executors herein- 
after named shall seem convenient. And as touching ye dispo- 
sition of my lands, tenements, hereditaments goods chattels 
and credits I will, devise and dispose of them as follows: Igive, 
grant, devise and bequeath to Frederick Flipse my grandson 
born in Barbadoes, ye only son of Philip my eldest son late de- 
ceased, ye following houses and Tenements in ye City of New 
York (to wit) That dwelling house with ye appurtenances I now 
live in, with ye house called ye Bolting house, and ye ground 
adjoining soe farr as ye Lean to stands, and soe farr as ye 
Gavell end of ye old Kitchen, and ye fence of ye widow De 
Kay, and also a Warehouse called ye middle warehouse and ye 
grounds behind it ye bredth of ye same Warehouse towards ye 
New Street and to extend in length to ye Broad Street, ye same 
ground lying there in bredth between my Cooper's house and 
ground of Isaac Kipp: and all those two dwelling houses and 
lotts of ground with their appurtenances lying and being near 
ye old Stadt-house at present in ye tenure of Mr. Carree and 
Mr. Droylett, and also these Lands tenements and hereditaments 
in the County of Westchester (to wit) That Island Papiriniman 
with ye meadows and Bridge' and ye Toll and all ye right and 
Title I have to ye same. And all those lands and meadows 
called ye Jonckers plantation together with all and singular 
houses. Mills, mill dams, orchards gardens Negroes, Negroes 
cliildren, cattle horses swine and whatever else belongs to me 
within that Patent as well what is tenanted as nott: as also a 
piece of land in the mile square by me late bought of Michael 
Hawden. And all that Tract or piece of Land extending from 
the Jonckers patent or plantation to a creek called by ye Indians 
Wys qua qua, and by the Christians William Portuguese's 
creek and thence according to ye course of that creek into ye 
woods to ye head of ye same, and from thence on an east line 
to the creek called the Jonckers creek, and thence to continue 
on the same course to Bronks river as farr as my right extends, 
as also all that ye equall half of my meadow lyeing at Tappan 
with ye rights hereditaments emoluments and appurtenances to 
ye same, arid all ye other estate herein before given and devised 
belonging or in any way appertaining. To have and to hold all 

•By the okl Dutch Church at Tarrytown. 
•Now King's Bridge on Harlem River. 



CtExekal histouy. 25 

ye real Estate, Tenements and hereditaments with ye appurte- 
nances here in before given and devised to ye said Frederick 
Flipse my grandson, and ye heires male of his body lawfully to 
be begotten, and for lack of such Issue ye Remainder thereof 
to m3^ son Adolphns Flipse and ye heires male of his bod}^ 
lawfully to be begotten, and for lack of such Issue to ye next 
right heirs of me ye said Frederick Flipse, ye Grandfather for 
ever Item I give and devise and bequeath to my said Grandson 
Frederick Flipse beside ye Negroes at ye Jonckers plantation 
herein before given and devised to him, a Negro man called 
Harry with his wife and child, a Negro man called Peter, a 
Negro man called Wan, ye boat Jonckervvith her furniture ap- 
parell and appurtenances and ye equal half of all ye cattle 
horses and sheep upon and belonging to ye plantation at ye 
upper Mills. To have all to hold all ye said Negroes and all ye 
said personal estate to him his heirs executors and assigns for- 
ever. 

" Item I give and bequeath to my said grandson his executors 
and Assigns forever an equall fourth part of all ye shipps ves- 
sels, plate, goods, merchandise, debts and personal estate what- 
soever which shall belong to me at the time of my decease, my 
debts and ye jmrticular legacys in this my will given being first 
satisfied and discharged. Provided always and I doe declare it 
my will mind and true meaning that I give ye lands extending 
from ye Jonckers plantation to William Portuguese creek and 
so to Bronks river to my said grandson with this restriction and 
condition, that it is in lew of a Tract of Land called Cinque- 
singh purchased by me and intended to be given to his father 
my eldest son, soe that if at any time hereafter ye said Fred- 
erick Flipse my Grandson shall clainie and recover this tract of 
land called Cinquesingh, then it is my will that the tract of land 
extending from ye Jonckers plantation to William Portuguese's 
creek, shall devolve unto and be vested in my said son Adol- 
phus his heires and assigns forever. 

"And I give devise and bequeath unto my son Adolphus 
Flipse ye following houses and tenements in ye City of New 
York (to witt) That house and ground that Isaac Marquise at 
present lives in and a house in ye Stone street next Isaac De 
Forrests with an old house formerly belonging to John Rider 
soe farr as to ye L?an to, and ye Gavell end of ye old kitchen, 
in lengtli t(j ye fence of ye widow De Kay and in breadtli to ye 



26 HISTORY OF PUTXAM COUNTY. 

fence of Isaac De Forrester so farras my right extends: as also 
a house and lott of gi'ound over against ye house I live in, 
stretching in breadth to ye house of Anneke Gosens and in 
length to ye house of Mr. Anthony Brockholes and also a house- 
and ground lyeing in ye broad street by ye house of Jacobus 
KipiJ with a ware house in ye New Street, and the ground be- 
tween both upon a straight line from ye South corner of ye 
warehouse to ye south corner of that house (to witt) from one 
street to the other, and also those lands tenants and heredita- 
ments in ye County of Westchester (to witt) all that tract of 
land lyeing at ye Upper Mills, beginning at a creek called by 
ye Indians Wys qua qua and by ye Christians William Portu- 
guese creek being ye bound of ye land given hereby to my 
Grandson, and soe running up Hudsons river to ye creek called 
Kightawan or Croton Kiver, soe along that river or creek ac- 
cording to the Patent, then on an east line into the woods as far 
as Bronks river thence to ye head of that river and along 
Bronks river accoi'ding to its course to ye lands herein before 
devised to my Grandson, as also ye moyety or equal half of a 
sawmill with its appurtenances at Mamaroneck late by me pur- 
chased of Dr. Seliraus. And also all that ye one equal half of 
ye meadow at Tappan by me purchased of Dr. George Lock- 
hart, and all that piece of meadow on the north side of TapiDan 
creek containing in quantity as is expressed in ye Patent for 
the same. To the said Adolphus my son and the heii'es male of 
his body lawfully to be begotten, and for lack of such issue to 
my Grandson Frederick Flipse and the heires male of his body- 
lawfully begotten, and for lack of such issue to the next right 
heires of me ye said Frederick the father, forever. 

" Item I give and devise and bequeath to my son Adolphus 
Flipse these negroes and slaves following (to witt) ye negro 
men called Symon, Charles, Towerhill, Samson, Claes, Billy 
Mingo, hendrick Bahyme and Hector, ye negro boy Peter, ye 
Indian woman called Hannah and her child, ye negro woman 
Susan ye younger, and ye negro woman Mary: 

'' I give and bequeath to my son Adolphus one equal half of my 
cattle horses and sheep belonging to ye plantations at ye upper 
mills, a large boat called ye Unity with her furniture late by mee 
bought of Jan Desmaretz and an equal fourth part of the per- 
sonal estate which shall belong to me at the time of my decease. 

" I do give and devise to mv eldest dau2:hter Eva the wife of 



GEXERAL HISTORY. 27 

Jacobus Yan CortlancU the house and grounds in ye City of 
New York where they at present live, as also a lott of ground 
in the same city in the New Street to the southward of the old 
ware house, as it lyes at present inclosed and fenced, and an 
equal fourth part of personal property. To have and to hold 
the said houses and premises during her natural life, and after 
her decease to ye second son of her body to be begotten, and 
his heires and assigns for ever, but for lack of such Issue to 
her son Frederick Cortlandt his heires and assigns. 

'' Item I give to my daughter Eva a certaine Mortgage of Dr. 
Henricus Selymus upon the lands of John Richbell deceased, 
twenty miles into ye woods. With this proviso, not to extend 
Bronx river into any of ye lands devised to my son or grand- 
son. 

"I give to my daughter Anatje wife of Philip French, that 
house and ground in the City of New York where they at pres- 
ent live, as also ye old Warehouse and ground thereunto be- 
longing lying in ye New Street, and all my estate of lands in 
ye County of Berghen in East Jersey (to witt) a house and lot 
in ye towne of Berghen a large garden, a plantation of fifteen 
acres, with eight morgen or about sixteen acres of meadow 
ground, and ye right and privilege in the undivided woodlands 
of two farms and ye plantation and all those my lands in the 
County of Ulster (to witt) a piece of land at Manibachus about 
two hundred and ninety acres, and a piece of land at ye Rom- 
bout Creek mortgaged to me by John Ward containing about 
seven hundred acres, and after my wifes decease that lot of 
ground in the City of New York extending from ye Broadway 
to ye New Street lying between ye ground late of Robert White 
deceased and William the Clockluyer And I do bequeath that 
my wife Catharine shall have during her natural life fifty pounds 
current money per annum, and that five and twenty pounds 
thereof be levyed in nature of a rent charge upon my estate at 
ye Jonckers, and the other twenty five upon my estate at the 
upper mills, and that she shall remaine and continue to dwell 
in ye house I now live in, and have and receive the money I 
have engaged and promised her according to our agreement be- 
fore and upon our marriage, preferable to all legacies whatso- 
ever. I devise to my said wife that lot in the City of New 
York extending from ye Broadway to ye New Street, lying be- 
between ve ground late of Robert Wliite deceased and William 



2S HISTORY OF PUTXA.M COUXTY. 

the Clockluyer, during lier natural life, and that she shall have 
the custody tutition and Guardianship of my grandson Fred- 
erick until he comes of age, who I devise may have ye best edu- 
cation and Learning these parts of ye world will afford him, not 
doubting of her care in bringing him up after ye best manner 
possible shee can. 

"Lastly I appoint my son Adolphus, and my son in law Ja- 
cobus Yan Cortlandt executors of this my last will and testa- 
ment, In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal 
this 26th, day of October 1700. 

"Frederick Flipse." 

Adolph Philipse, the second son of Frederick Philipse, died 
unmarried and intestate, in 1749. Like his father he was not 
only a weathly merchant, but held high official position. On 
the rumor that the French were about to attack Albany, he was 
sent, in 1691, to Connecticut to ask assistance from that colony. 
He was appointed member of Council February 7th, 1704-5, and 
in 1718 was one of the commissioners to arrange and settle the 
boundary between New York and Connecticut. In 1721, he was 
removed from the Council on the representation of Governor 
Burnett, for opposing the continuance of the Assembly after 
his Excellency's arrival. In 1719, he was member of Assembly 
for Westchester, and was speaker in 1725. In 1736, he was one of 
the four members from New York and was speaker till 1737. At 
the election in that year he was not elected, but upon the death 
of Gerrit Yan Home, one of the members, he was elected to fill 
the vacancy, and although the election was disputed, he was 
sustained. He was reelected speaker in 1739, and held that 
honorable position till 1745. He died in January, 1749, at the 
agejof 85. John Jay said of him, "He was a man of superior 
talent, well educated, sedate, highly respected and popular. 
Except that he was penurious I have heard nothing to his dis- 
advantage." His portrait is among the family relics in posses- 
sion]of the Philipse family, and represents him in the prime of 
life. Among the accounts of Joseph Reed, the administrator 
of the estate, there is charged against Frederick Philipse, the 
ancestor of the present family of Putnam county, the follow- 
ing] item: "Jan. 25th, ,1749, To the picture of Mr. Adolph 
Philipse, £6." 

Frederick Philipse, who inheritel from his grandfather the 



GENEKAL HISTORY. 29 

immense estiue of tlie Manor of Philipsburg, and from bis 
uncle, Adolph Philipse, the Highland Patent, was born in Bar- 
badoes in 1G9S, and when four years old came to New York. 
Enterino- upon life with all the advantages that wealth and 
high position could bestow, he soon became one of the most 
distinguished citizens of the province. From 1721 to 1728, he 
was speaker of the Assembly. In 1733, he was baron of the 
Exchequer and he also held the office of third judge of the 
Supreme Court, till the time of his death, while his social posi- 
tion as "Lord of the Manor of Philipsburg," placed him in 
the highest rank of the landed gentry of the period. He mar- 
ried Johanna, youngest daughter of Gov. Anthony Brockholst.' 
They were the parents of five children : Frederick, born in 
JSTew York; Philip, baptized 1727; Susannah, born Sept. 27th, 
1727, married Col. Beverly Robinson; Mary, born July 5th. 
1730, married Col. Roger Morris; and Margaret, who died un 
married. 

Mrs. Johanna Philipse was killed by a fall from her carriage 
on the Highland estate, and her husband, Frederick Philipse, 
died July 26th, 1751, at the age of 53. He was buried at the 
old Dutch Church, at Tarrytown, on his Manor of Philipsburg. 
The following notice of his death appeared in the "New York 
Gazette:" 

"Last Friday evening departed this life in the 53rd year of 
his age the Honorable Frederick Philipse Esq. one of his Majes- 
ties justices of the Supreme Court of the Province and a 
Representative in the General Assembly for the County of 
Westchester. He was a gentleman conspicuous for an abundant 
fortune, but it was not his wealth that established his merit. 
His indulgence and tenderness to his tenants, his more than 
parental affection for his children, and his incessant liberality 
to the indigent suri)assed the splendor of his estate, and pro- 
cured him'a more unfeigned regard than can be purchased with 
opulence, or gained by interest. There were perhaps few men 
that ever equaled him in those obliging and benevolent manners, 
which, at the same time that they attract the love of his 
Inferiors, gained him all the respect and veneration due to his 

'Gov. Antlumv Broi'kliolst nuuTioil Susannah, daughter of Palus Schrick, an 
i>arly settlor who came from Holhmd. He left five children: Henry; Judith, 
wife of Dirck Van Vechten: Susannah, wife of Philip French: Mary, who died 
unmarried: and Johanna, wife of Frederick Philipse. A will of Susannah, 
widow of (!ov. Bro(.'kiiolst, dated ITU. is among the Philipse papers. 



30 HISTOKY OF PUTXAM COUNTY. 

rank and station. That lie was a lover of his country is glo- 
riously attested by his being repeatedly elected into the Assem- 
bly, for the last thirty years of his life. He had a disposition 
extremely social and was, what few ever attain to, a good com- 
panion. But what I have said of his character, is far from 
being a finished portrait, it is only a sketch of some few of his 
excellent qualities; many features I am sure have escaped me, 
but I dare say that those I have attempted are not set off with 
false colors, but drawn faithfully from the life." 

He died possessed of a large fortune which was distributed 
among liis children. 

ABSTRACT OF WILL OF FKEDERICK PHILIPSE. 

"In the name of God, Amen. I Frederick Philipse of the 
city of New Tork being in tolerable health of body and of 
sound and perfect mind and understanding, thanks be to 
Almighty God, do make this my last will and testament. And 
first I surrender and Recommend my immortal soul into the 
hands of the infinite God who gave it, hopeing for salvation 
through the merits of my blessed Eeedeemer Jesus Christ, 
and my body I order to be buried with great Decency but with 
no ostentation in the family vault at the Upper Mills, and as 
touching the distribution of my estate I devise as follows: 

" Item first orders all debts and funeral charges paid. 

" Item Second Whereas my uncle Adolph Philipse and 
Jacobus Van Cortlandt purchased of John Richbell a certain 
tract of land at Mamaraneck in the County of Westchester, and 
Jacobus Van Cortlandt conveyed all his estate in the said tract 
to the said Adolph Philipse which is come to me as heir at law, 
I bequeath the same unto my eldest son Frederick. * * * 
All the manor of Philipsburg and all tracts of land in W^est- 
chester County, that are on the east of Hudson's river and 
bounded northward by a creek called by the Indians Kichta 
wank and by the English Kroten's river, and so eastward into 
the woods along the creek two English miles, and thence upon 
a direct East line to Bronks river, and so running Southward 
along Bronks river, until a direct west line cutteth the South 
side of a neck or Island of land at a creek or Kill called Pap- 
parinimo, which divides York island from the main, and so 
from thence north ward along Hudson's river to the creek called 
Kiohtawank. (excepting the farm in the possession of William 



GENERAL HISTORY. 31 

Jones hereinafter devised) also the bridge called Kingsbridge 
with all the Tolls, and also my salt meadow in Orange County 
tidjoining Hudson's river, and also that certain Lott of Ground 
facing Duke Street, also the house and land where John Pintard 
lately lived, also that dwelling house store house and Lott 
situate in Stone street in the City of New York now in posses- 
sion of ray son in law Beverly Robinson * * to my eldest 
son Frederick Philipse during his life, and after his death to 
his eldest son. [The will then proceeds to entail this estate 
iipon the male heirs to all futurity]. 

" To my dearly beloved wife Johanna an annuity of £400. 

"I order the sum of £400 to be expended towards erecting a 
€hurch of England as by law established on the farm near and 
to the northward of the house now in the possession of Wm. 
Jones Senior, by the Saw mill river, and I devise the farm now 
in tenure of Wm. Jones for the use of such ministers as shall 
be inducted in said church to remain as a Glebe for said Church.' 
[The portion of the will which disposes of the Highland Patent 
is given entire in another place]. 

" Whereas upon the marriage of my son Philip I promised 
to give him Two thousand Pounds which I have paid him, and 
whereas I also promised to my daughter Susannah the like sum 
as her marriage portion which I have since paid to her husband 
Beverly Robinson: it is my will that the like sum be paid to 
each of my other daughters, to wit Mary and Margaret Philipse, 
iit their marriage * * * and as good an outsett in clothing, 
plate, kitchen and household furniture as my eldest daughter 
Susannah has received from me. 

" I bequeath to my daughter Susannah, wife of Beverly Rob- 
inson, all that dwelling house gang way and Lott of ground 
whereon I now live, and to my daughter Mary the dwelling 
house and Lott where Mr. David Clarkson lately lived being the 
■corner of Stone street, and to my daughter Margaret all that 
house and Lott bounded South by Mr. Chambers, west by high 
water mark, north partly by an Alley and partly by the house 
and grounds of Bartholemew Le Rouse, and east partly by the 
ground of the said Rouse and partly by the Broadway, and to 
my son Philip ' my dwelling house where my uncle Adolph 
Philipse lived and dyed in ' and store house and lot of ground 
thereto belonging: and to my son Frederick all that my corner 

'This is tlie farm and church lot of the Episcopal Church in Yonkers. 



32 HISTOKY OF PUTNA31 COUNTY. 

house fronting Broadway andl Stone Street, and the house and 
ground where John Eoome^now lives and my storehouse and lot 
fronting Broad Street. 

" I devise to my wife Johanna my Coach house in New Street 
during her life. * * * 

"To my son Frederick all my stock and utensils and all my 
negroes, except my negro boy Charles whom I bequeath to my 
wife. * * * I appoint my dearly beloved wife Johanna 
Philipse, my son Philip, my son in law Beverley Robinson 
executors of this Will, and my daughters Mary and Margaret 
executrixes. In virtue whereof I have hereunto set my hand 
and seal this sixth of June in the year one thousand and seven 
hundred and fifty one. 

" Feed Philipse. (L. S.)" 
" Witnesses Jos. Murray, 

Wm. Livingston, 
Jakes Emott." 

A codicil to this will July 22d, 1751, gives to his wife Johanna 
the use of the houses and lots in New York given in the will to 
his daughters, during her life, and enumerates forty-six negroes, 
which were divided among his children. 

Frederick Philipse, the oldest son, was the last lord of the 
Manor of Philipsburg. He is said to have been a man of quiet 
manners and indisiDosed to exertion. He was colonel of militia, 
and member of the Provincial Assembly. At the time of the 
Revolution he adhered to the Royal cause but took no active 
part in hostility to the new government and was permitted to 
live in quiet neutrality in Connecticut, upon giving his parole. 
In an evil hour he was induced to go to New York, when occu- 
pied by the British and very imprudently neglected all warn- 
ings to return. In consequence he was with many others 
attainted of treason, his immense estate of Philipsburg confis- 
cated and sold in small parcels to his former tenants, who thus 
became landlords, and he himself banished from his native land 
where his ancestors had been so highly distinguished, went to 
England and ended his days there. He married Elizabeth, 
daughter of Charles Williams, Esq., and his descendants are 
still living in Great Britain. 

In the Cathedral, in Chester, England, is a marble tablet to 
his memory bearing the following inscription: 



GENKRAL HISTOItY. 33 

•'Sacred to the memory of Frederick Philipse, Esq., late of 
the province of New York, a gentleman in whom the various 
Social, Domestic and Religions virtues were eminently united. 
The uniform rectitude of his conduct commanded the esteem 
of others, whilst the benevolence of his heart and the gentleness 
of his manners secured their love: and firmly attached to his 
Sovereign and British Constitution he opposed, at the hazzard 
of his life, the late Rebellion in North America, and for this 
faithful discharge of his duty to his King and Country he was 
proscribed, and his Estate, one of the largest in New York, was 
confiscated by the usurped Legislature of that Province: when 
the British troops were withdrawn from New York in 1783 he 
quitted a province to which he had always been an ornament 
and benefactor, and came to England leaving all his property 
behind him, which reverse of fortune he bore with that calm- 
ness, fortitude and dignity, which had distinguished him 
through every former stage of his life. He was born at New 
York the 12th day of Sept., 1720, and died in this place the 30 
April 1785 aged 65 years." 

Philip Philipse, the 
second son, who with his 
sisters became the owner 
of the Highland Patent, 
married Margaret, 
daughter of Nathaniel 
Marston.' They were 11^,5 
the parents of three children: Adolph, born August 17th, 1745; 
Frederick, born May 3d, 1755; and Nathaniel, born August 5th, 
1756. Philip Philipse died at an early age. May 9th, 1768, and 
was buried in the vault of Nathaniel Marston, in Trinity Church, 
New York. 

'Nathaniel Mai-ston, the ancestor of the family, was bom in Leicestershire in 
1000, settled in tlie "West Indies in 1G33, and was agent of the Company for 
settling the Island of Providence •• on account of his knowledge of those parts.'" 
He had a wife, IMary, and a son John, who had a Patent for land on Long Island 
in lC6fl. John married Anne Say and had two children, Nathaniel and Anne. 
Nathaniel was born about 1665 and left Long Island and settled in New York 
where he was a prominent citizen and for many years vestryman of Trinitv 
Church, and helped to build the church at New Rochelle. He married ilaro-riete 
daughter of Abel and Anetje Hardenbrock and die<l in ITil, leaving children: 

Nathaniel: Thomas, who died in 1741, unmarried: Margaret, wife of Hendlv; 

John, (who h.ad wife Mary and children: Mary, wife of George Richards, and 
Anne, wife of Jolm Minot): JIary. who died unmarried: and Anne, wife of 
ElM.iiezer (hunt. 




34 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 



WILL OF PHILIP PHILIPSE. 



"In the name of God, Amen. I Philip Pliilipse of the City 
of New York, being at present weak in body but of sound and 
disposing mind and Memory do make this my last will & Test- 
ament in manner and form following. 

"First, I will that all my just debts be paid and satisfied, 
for the pay men whereof I do hereby charge all that my Tract 
or Lot of land called Lot Number eight, situate in the County 
of Dutchess, containing about eleven thousand and fifty seven 
acres, and which for that purpose I do hereby order and em- 
power my executors hereinafter mentioned or the majority of 
them to sell and dispose of the said tract or Lot of Land to any 
purchaser or purchasers in fee simple. Item I give and bequeath 
unto my beloved wife Margaret Philipse all my plate furniture 
and personal estate whatsoever. 

"Item, all the rest of my real estate whatsoever, not here- 
inbefore disposed of I give unto my said wife Margaret Philipse 
and nnto my sons Adolph Philipse, Frederick Philipse, and 
Nathaniel Philipse, their heirs and assigns forever, equally to 
be divided among them share and share alike. And if any of 
my said children should happen to die under age, and without 
lawful issue and in such case I give and devise the part or share 
of him, so dying under age and without lawful Issue unto my 
said wife and surviving children, their heirs and assigns forever 
equally to be divided between them, share and share alike. 

"Item, I give and bequeath all the monies that shall arise 

Nathaniel was born March 27th, 1704, and married Mary, daughter of Jolin and 
Elizabeth Crook. Like his father he was a prominent citizen and Warden of 
Trinitv. He died October 21st, 1778, and was buried in a vault in TrinitT Church. 
His children were: 1st, Margaret, born JIarch 14th, 1727-8. 

2d, Nathaniel, born December 1st, 1730, and married Anna, daughter of 
Jacobus Van Cortlandt. Their children were: Frances, wife of Charles Morgan, 
afterwards Warburton, Bishop ot Lemerick; and Mary, who maiTied her cousin, 
Frederick Philipse, son of Philip. 

After the death of Jacobus Van Cortlandt, his widow married A'an Home 

and had four children: Augustus Valette; Elizabeth, wife of Thomas S. Clarkson: 
Frederick; Ann Mary, wife of Levinus Clarkson; and James P. 

3d, Thomas, born April 16tli, 17:59, married Amelia Lispenard, and died January 
11th, 1814. 

4tli, John, born December 6th, 1742, graduated at Kings College, 1760. He 
married Rachel, wife of Thomas La^\Tence, and had cliildren: Mary, wife of 
Thomas White; Nathaniel; Rachel, wife of Nathaniel Grant: Thomas and John. 
There are descendants of this family in England and the West Indies. 




f:-ili- F-ii^r 



GENERAL HISTORY. 35 

from the sale of the said Lot number eight herein before ordered 
to be sold that shall be more than sufficient for the payment of 
my debts unto my said wife Margaret Philipse, her executors 
and assigns forever. 

"And lastly I do hereby nominate and appoint my said wife 
Margaret Philipse, Mr. I^athaniel Marston, The Honourable 
Roger Morris Esq. and Beverly Robinson, executors of this my 
last will and Testament. 

"In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal 
this thirtieth day of January in the year of our Lord one thous- 
and seven hundred and sixty eight. 

"Philip Philipse." 

After the decease of her husband, Mrs. Margaret Philipse 
married Rev. John Ogilvie, D.D., assistant minister of Trinity 
Church, April 15th, 1769. He died November 26th, 1774. She 
survived him many years and died February 11th, 1807. There ' 
were no children by this marriage. 

Nathaniel, the youngest son, graduated from King's College 
(now Columbia) May 18th, 1773. He was an officer in the 
British army, and his commission as Ensign in the 17th Regi- 
ment, signed by Sir William Howe, is dated August 28th, 1776. 
He was killed at the battle of Germantown, October 4th, 1777, 
at the early age of 21 years, 1 month, and 29 days. The follow- 
ing letter bore to his friends the notice of his untimely death. 

"Camp near Germantown 
11 8ber 1777 
"My Dear Fred. 

"It is with the greatest concern that I tind myself obliged to 
inform you of the unhappy fate of poor Nat. He was killed 
the 4th instant, in an attack made by 22,000 rebels on German- 
town. He received his wound on the left cheek, the ball lodged 
near the brain. He was buried, but Mr. Marston had him dug 
lip and carried to Philadelphia where he was interred the 6th 
inst. 

"It must be a great consolation to his friends that (since it 
was God's will he sliould be cutoff) he fell universally regretted. 
Also that he did not linger any time in torment. He never 
spoke. This is indeed a severe trial for poor Mrs. Ogilvie. God 
grant her fortitude to bear it. We had a number of officers 



36 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

killed and wounded. Mr and Mrs Marston and family are very 
well. I assure you it is impossible for me to return the partic- 
ular attention they honor me with. I shall always acknowledge 
it with gratitude. I hope your family are all well. Present my 
affectionate respects and love to Mrs Marston, Mrs Ogilvie, 
Philip and Miss Marston. 

"And believe me to be Dear Fred 

" Your most affectionate 
"Wm Jehbson." 

As Nathaniel Philipse was of lawful age when he died and 
left no will, his share of his father's estate went to his eldest 
brother, Adolph, who died June Sth, 17S5, unmarried, and from 
his will dated June 2d, 178.5, and proved June 24th of same 
year it is learned that he gave to his mother the use of one 
thousand pounds during her life; to Mary Saunders £250; and 
.to Elizabeth Aymar the use of £500 till she was 21 years of age, 
or married, and then the principal was to be paid to her. He 
also gave Ann Grant and Margaret Grant £150 each. 

The testator charged his entire estate with the jjayment of 
these legacies, and gave all the residue of his estate to his broth- 
er, Frederick Philipse, during his life, and after his death to 
the testator's neiee, Mary Philipse, daughter of his brother Fred- 
erick, her heirs and assigns forever. In case she should die in 
her father" s lifetime without issue the same was to go to Fred- 
erick Philipse absolutely. 

He appointed his mother Margaret Ogilvie, executrix; Thom- 
as Belden and Richard Harrison, executors. 

Mrs. Margaret Ogilvie died intestate, leaving as her sole and 
only heir her son, Frederick Philipse. 

Both Adolph Philipse and his brother Frederick were officers 
in the British army. The commission of the former, as captain 
in an "Independent Company of Rangers" is signed by Wil- 
liam Tryon, the last provincial governor, and dated September 
9th, 1772; while the commission of the latter, as captain in the 
"Safe Guards whereof Beverly Robinson is Colonel," is signed 
by Sir Henry Clinton, and dated July 1st, 1779. Frederick 
Philipse graduated from King's College, and his diploma, dated 
May ISth, 1773, is, with that of his ill-fated brother Xathaniel, 
among the Philipse papers in possession of the family. 

In ISll, Frederick Philipse released to his daughter, Mary, 



GKXERAL HISTORY. 



37 




liis life interest in Lot No. 6, the fee of which she inherited by 
the will of his brother Adolph. 



/U7 



It will he seen by the foregoing that tbe whole of the High- 
land Patent was at the close of the Revolution vested in Beverly 
Robinson and his wife Susannah, Roger Morris and his wife 
Mary, Frederick Philipse and his daughter Mary, and Mrs. Ogil- 
vie. The shares of Robinson and Morris were confiscated as will 
be seen in a succeeding chapter. Frederick Philipse married his 
cousin, Mary Marston, who died in December, 1849, and by this 
marriage he had one child. Mary, born October 14th, 1779, who 
married Samuel Gouverneur about ISOl. After the decease of 
his first wife, Mr. Philipse married Maria Kenible, who left no 
children. Frederick Philipse died May 3d, 1S29, leaving his 
daughter Mary Gouverneur his sole heir. The children of Mary 
Philipse and Samuel Gouverneur were: Frederick Philipse, 
(who by an Act of ^p 

/s'30 i — j~y 



Legislature' took the 
name of Frederick 
Philipse) ; Adolph 
Nathaniel, born Sep- 
tember 29th, 1S05, 
who married Eliza- 
beth Gill. He died 
January 28th, 1853, 



leaving one daughter Mary, the wife of 
John H. Iselin; Samuel M. W., who died unmarried December 
ISth, 1876; Margaret Philipse, who married William Moore; 
and Mary Marston, who is now living at Garrisons. 

Frederick Philipse, tlie eldest son, married Catharine Wads- 
worth Post. He died October 26'-h, 1874, leaving two daughters: 
Catharine Wadsworth Philipse; and Margaret Gouverneur Phil- 
ipse, both now living at Garrisons. 

Samuel Gouverneur died January 2Sth, 1847, at the age of 76. 

' " An act to c}iange the name of Frederick P. Gouverneur, passed April Tth, 
1830." "Be it enacted, t&c." "The name of Frederick P. Gouverneur of the 
town of Pliilipstown in the county of Putman is hereby changed to Frederick 
Philipse, by wliich latter name he shall be hereafter known in all cases what- 
soever." 



38 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

His wife survived him a year and died December 4tli, 18-18. She 
left her real estate to her five children. 

In the old Philipse Manor House at Yonkers one feature has 
puzzled colonial antiquarians. Above the mantel, in the prin- 
cipal room, is blazoned in relief the well known ostrich plume 
badge of the Princes of AVales. That the Philipses— holding 
their lands by favor of the Crown, high in the colonial councils 
of the British monarch, growing rich in the sunshine of royal 
patronage and confidence, ostentatiously loyal while the colony 
was dividing into tory and whig — should have committed a tech- 
nical high treason and have flung in the face of royalty so gratu- 
itous an insult as the unauthorized display of the badge in 
question would have been, is not to be imagined. That by 
special permission they bore the badge of the heirs apparent of 
the crown is equally out of the question, since such a conces- 
sion would have been a matter of record and well known to the 
royal heralds, who have no note of this, and the fact would 
have been a proud memory of the family, which, however, has 
no tradition in such regard. The only remaining alternative is 
that the Philipse family blazoned the badge in their own right, 
independently of the Princes of Wales, not improbably from a 
common source. This is supported by the tradition corrobor- 
ated by historical data, that the Philipses came from Bohemia; 
for the current derivation of the badge of the Princes of Wales 
is that the Black Prince took it from the blind king of Bo- 
hemia conquered at Cressy. That an old Bohemian family 
should bear the badge in its own right is therefore easily under- 
stood. But a still more striking coincidence has been pointed 
out by Mr. Woodward, the American antiquarian, who cites the 
more trustworthy derivation, viz., that the ostrich plumes came 
into British heraldry from Philippa of Hainault, whose cogniz- 
ance it was. The continental method, devised among the Ro- 
mans, of naming all daughters by the patronym of the gens, so 
that the daughters of the Cornelian gens would be named in 
the order of seniority, Cornelia Prima, Cornelia Secunda, &c., 
and the heiresses of Philip all Philippas, is so well known and 
was so generally followed, that the coincidence, combined with 
that of the badge, almost proves the identity of the family 
from whom Philippa of Hainault took the name with that 
whose name has been preserved as " Philip (se) "—in itself a 
patronym. This combined with the identity of the other or 



GENERAL HISTORY. 39 

Bohemian tradition (also common both to the badge of the 
Prince of Wales and the Philipse family) leaves it hard to 
doubt that the heir-apparent of the British Crown and the Vred- 
erick Flypsen, driven from his country because of his religion, 
and seeking his fortunes in New Amsterdam, derived the badge 
of ostrich plumes from a common source. Whether from 
Philippa of Hainault or the blind king of Bohemia, or neither, 
does not matter, since the probable cause of the varying tra- 
ditions as to whence the Black Prince took his cognizance is 
that it was derived from an older source from which it had also 
descended both to the blind king and the heiress of Philip. 



CHAPTER IT. 

THE DIVISION OF THE HIGHLAND PATENT. 

UPON the decease of Frederick Philipse in 1751, the High- 
land Patent, by the terms of his will, passed into the 
possession of his four younger children; Philip, Susannah, 
Mary and Margaret. The last died about 1752, without issue, 
and her share went to others in equal proportions. It will be 
seen by referring to the terms of the will that these persons did 
not have the estate in fee simple absolute, but that it was en- 
tailed, they owning simply a life interest. Before proceeding 
to a division of this tract, they resolved to take steps to bar 
the entail. The documents connected with the case are curious 
and interesting as showing the old forms of English law, and a 
complicated course of procedure which has long since j^assed 
away. 

The first step in this process was to make an arrangement by 
which certain lands which had been leased to Petrus Dubois 
could be included, and the following instrument was executed. 

" To all to whom these presents shall come, I, Peter Dubois. 
Junior, of Dutchess County send greeting. Whereas I do hold 
for the term of my life, out of the tract of land lately belong- 
ing to Adolph Philipse, Esq., deceased, in the county of 
Dutchess, commonly known by the name of the Highlands or 
Philipse' s upper Patent, on the east side of the Hudson River, 
at the south side of the Fishkill, begining at the head of a 
spring by a Botten Wood tree marked on two sides with three 
notches, and a cross on the north side, then north westward 
along said siting, till it comes in a brook or run of water; then 
northward along said brook till it comes in the Fishkill Bay by 
a place called Plum Point, and then beginning again by the 
Botten Wood tree at the head of the aforesaid spring; thence 
south east to the body of the high hills; then eastward along 



GENEKAL HISTORY. 41 

said hills and from the aforesaid place called Plum Point, and 
eastward along the said Fishkill till it includes one hundred and 
fifteen acres of land, between the high hills and the Fishkills, 
with the hereditaments and appurtenances, the immediate re- 
version or remainder whereof doth now belong unto Philip 
Philipse, Beverly Robinson, and Susannah, his wife, and Mary 
Philipse, and to the respective heirs of the bodys of the said 
Philip, Susannah, and Mary forever. 

"Now, know ye that for the perfecting of some assurance 
shortly to be made by the said Philip Philipse, Beverly Robin- 
son, and Susannah, his wife, and Mary Philipse, of the said 
lands and tenements by way of common recovery, for and in 
consideration of one shilling, lawful money of New York, to 
me paid, I have granted and surrendered and by these presents 
do grant and surrender unto the said Philip Philipse, Beverly 
Robinson, and Susannah, his wife, and Mary Philipse, and 
their heirs, upon the condition hereinafter mentioned, all the 
said lands and tenements, and all my estate, right, title, and in- 
terest therein and within the bounds of the said tract of land 
called the Highlands or Philii)se's upper Patent. 

" To have and to hold to the said Philip Philipse, Beverly 
Robinson, and Susannah, his wife, and Mary Philipse, and their 
heirs, upon condition that if they, the said Philip Philipse, 
Beverly Robinson, and Susannah, his wife, and Mary Philipse 
do not pay, or cause to be paid unto me. the said Peter D. Bois, 
the sum of five hundred pounds, lawful money of New York, 
upon the first day of June next ensuing after the date hereof, 
that then and from lienceforth this present grant and surrender 
shall be utterly void and of none effect, and that then it shall 
be lawful for me, the said lands and tenements to repossess and 
enjoy, as in my former estate and right, anything in these 
presents in any wise to the contrary notwithstanding. 

" In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal, 
the twenty-seventh day of Jane, in the twenty-seventh year of 
the Reign of our Sovereign Lord, George the Second, Annoque 
Domini 1753. 

" Pkti:us Dubois. (L. S.)" 

The next step was whac was styled a '• deed of lease and re- 
lease " by which the premises were leased to a third party who 
was in reality the attorney for the persous interested. 



42 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

" This Indenture made the twenty -eighth day of June in the 
twenty-seventh year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord, 
George, the Second, by the Grace of God, of Great Britian, 
France and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, &c, Anno 
Domini, 1753, between Philip Philipse, Beverly Robinson and 
Susannah, his wife, and Mary Philipse of the first part and 
William Alexander of the second part Witnesseth, that the 
parties afore said of the first part for and in consideration of 
five shillings to them in hand paid by the said William Alex- 
ander have bargained and sold and by these presents do bargain 
and sell to the said William Alexander all that large tract of 
land situate and being on the east side of Hudsons River in 
Dutchess County in the province of New York which by letters 
patent was granted to Adolph Philipse deceased which said tract 
of land is commonly called and known by the name of Mr. 
Phillipses upper or Highland patent together with the appurte- 
nances, which tract of land is more fully to be described in a 
release and deed to lead to the uses of a recovery of the premises 
to morrow to be made. Together with all the estate, right, title 
and interest of the parties aforeeaid of the first part and of every 
of them of in and to the said large tract of land and premises 
with the appurtenances. 

" To have and to hold the above-bargained premises to the 
said William Alexander from the day before the day of the 
date of these presents for and during the term of one whole 
year from thence next ensuing to the intent that by virtue of 
these presents and of the Statute for transferring uses into pos- 
session the said AVilliam Alexander may be in the actual posses- 
sion of the premises and thereby enabled to accept of a grant 
and a release of a freehold in the premises, to morrow to be 
made that he may be a perfect Tenant to a x^recipe in a common 
recovery of the jn'emises to be suffered. 

" In witness whereof the parties to these presents Indentures 
have interchangeably set their hands and seals the day and year 
first above written. 

" Philip Philipse. (l. s.) 

" Susannah Robinson, (l. s.) 
" William Alexander, (l. s.) 
" Bev. Robinson. (l. s.) 

" Mary Philipse. (l. s.) 




MARY FHILIFSE- Mrs, Mnrris- 

rfiil;r = 5- C-auvcrnsar family 



gf:xeral history. 43 

" Sealed and delivered in the presence of 
" John Rypel. • 
" Catherine Jandin." 

The " Statute for transferring uses into possession," which is 
mentioned in the foregoing lease is very frequently mentioned 
in ancient deeds. By its provisions a person who held a lease 
of a piece of land for one year was considered in actual posses- 
sion, although he might never have seen it. It then became 
customary when selling land to parties who did not intend to 
enter iipon actual occupancy, to give a lease for " one whole 
year" for a nominal sum. By this means the person in the eye 
of the law became actually "seized " of the premises the same as 
if dwelling upon it. The next day, a deed was made out in full 
form, and with all the verbosity which characterized ancient 
conveyances of land, and which has not yet wholly disappeared, 
and the delivery of this deed was in effect putting the purchaser 
in actual possession, as much as the still more ancient form of 
delivery to the purchaser of a " turf and a twig" as a part and 
parcel of the granted premises. In accordance with this law 
and custom the following deed was given the next day. 

'• This Indenture Quintipartite, made the twenty-ninth 
day of June in the twenty seventh year of the Reign of our 
Sovereign Lord George the Second by the Grace of God of 
Great Britian France and Ireland King Defender of the Faith 
etc Annoque Domini 1753, Between Philip Philipse of the first 
part, Beverly Robinson and Susannah his wife of the Second 
l^art, Mary Philipse of the third part William Alexander of the 
fourth part and Thomas Jones of the fifth part, Whereas Colonel 
Frederick Philipse deceased father of the said Philip, Susannah 
and Mary by his last Will and Testament in his life time duly 
made and executed by him and bearing date on or about the sixth 
day of June one thousand seven hundred and fifty one amongst 
other things recited that there was a large tract of land situate 
and being on the East side of Hudson s River which by letters 
patent bearing date on or about the seventeenth day of June in 
the year of our Lord one thousand six hundred and ninety 
seven was granted unto Adolj^h Philipse Uncle to the testator 
and his heirs, butted and bounded as therein mentioned refer- 
ence being thereunto had, which said tract of land was com- 
monly called or known by the name of Mr. Phili^ises upper or 



44 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

liigliland patent and whicli said large tract of land and the 
estate right and title in and to the same then belonged to and 
was vested in the said Frederick Philipse the Testator as heir at 
Law to his said Uncle Wherefore he the said Frederick by his 
last AVill did devise and bequeath the said large tract of land 
with the appurtenances in the manner in the said last Will set 
forth that is to say, one quarter part thereof unto his said son 
Philip party to these presents and to the heirs of his body for- 
ever, one other quarter part thereof unto his eldest Daughter 
Susannah party to these presents and to the heirs of her body 
forever. One other quarter part thereof unto his second daugh- 
ter Mary party to these presents and to the heirs of her body 
forever, and the other quarter part thereof unto his youngest 
daughter Margaret Philipse since deceased and to the heirs of 
her body forever, and the said Frederick the Testator by his 
said last AVill did provide that if his said son Philip Philipse 
or any or either of his said daughters should happen to die 
without issue then and in such case the quarter part or parts 
thereby devised to him her or those of them so dying without 
issue he did Will devise and bequeath unto the survivor of them 
equally to be divided between them and to the respective heirs 
of their body forever and if three of them should happen to 
die without issue then he willed devised and bequeathed the 
three quarter parts of those so dying without issue unto the sur- 
vivor of them and to the heirs of the body of such survivor 
forever with sundry further remainders over upon the contin- 
gencys therein mentioned as by the said last Will duly proved 
and remaining of record in the Secretary's Office of New York, 
reference being thereunto had folly and at large may appear. 

'• Now this Indenture Witnesseth that (in order to the bar- 
ring and docking the said Intails and remainder over) the 
parties aforesaid of the first second and third part for and in 
consideration of the sum of five shillings to them in hand paid 
by the said William Alexander the receipt whereof they do 
hereby acknowledge and discharge him thereof for ever have 
granted bargained sold released enfeoffed and confirmed and 
they and every of them by these presents do grant bargain 
sell release enfeoft" and confirm to the said William Alexander 
party hereto (the same in his possession being by virtue of a 
bargain and sale to him thereof made bearing date the day be- 
fore the day of the date of these presents and by virtue of the 




MARGARET FHILIPSE- (ob, 17S3.) 

?hai-^ = -G2av=raRi;,. family. 



GENERAL HISTORY. 45 

Statute for transt'emnft' uses into possession) and to his assigns 
all the said large tract of land situate and being on the east side 
of Hudsons River which by the Letters patent aforesaid was 
granted to the said Adolph Philipse which said tract of land is 
commonly called and known by the name of Mr. Philipse' s 
upper or highland patent, together with all the estate right title 
and interest of the parties aforesaid of the first second and third 
part of it in and to the same and every part thereof with the 
appurtenances. 

"To have and to hold the above bargained and released 
premises unto the said William Alexander and his assigns for 
and during the natural lives of the parties aforesaid of the first, 
second and third part to the intent and purpose that the said 
William Alexander shall and may be perfect tenant of the 
Freehold of all the lands and premises above mentioned until 
one good and perfect recovery may be had against him the said 
William Alexander of the same lands and premises, and it is 
covenanted, granted, concluded and agreed by and between all 
the said parties to these presents that it shall and may be law- 
ful to and for the said Thomas Jones party hereto of the fifth 
part, before the last day of October term next ensuing the date 
of these presents to prosecute out of the high Court of Chan- 
cery for the province of New York one or more Writt or Writts 
of entry Sur Disseizin in Le port against the said William 
Alexander returnable in the Supreme Court of New York, 
whereby the said Thomas Jones shall and may demand against 
the said William Alexander all and singular the aforesaid 
premises with the appurtenances by the name of five hundred 
messuages, twenty mills, twenty dove houses, five hundred gar- 
dens, two hundred thousand acres of land, one hundred thous- 
and acres of meadow, two hundred thousand acres of pasture, 
two hundred thousand acres of wood, thirty thousand acres of 
Marsh, ten thousand acres of land covered with water and com- 
mon of pasture for all cattle, with appurtenances at Philipses 
upper patent and Philipses precinct and in Dutchess, or by such 
other name or names, quantity orquantitys, quality or qualitys, 
number or content of acres, as shall be thought fitt and 
requisite, unto which said Writ or Writs, the said William 
Alexander shall appear in his proper person and shall vouch 
to warrant the said Philip Philipse herein first named who shall 
appear gratis upi)n the voucher and shall enter into warranty 



46 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTT. 

and shall vouch over to warrant the said Beverly Robinson and 
Susannah his wife who shall also appear gratis upon the voucher 
and shall enter into warranty and shall vouch over to warrant 
the said Mary Philipse party to these presents who shall also 
appear gratis upon the voucher and shall enter into warranty 
and shall vouch over to warrant the common vouchee and the 
common vouchee shall appear and Imparte and afterwards 
make default whereby one recovery or judgment may be had 
and given for the said Thomas Jones for recovery of the said 
lands tenements hereditaments and premises aforesaid against 
the said William Alexander and for the said William Alexander 
to recover over in value against the said Philip Philipse first 
named and for the same Philip Philipse to recover over in value 
against the said Beverly Robinson and Susannah his wife and 
for the same Beverly Robinson and Susannah his wife to' recover 
over in value against the said Mary Philipse party to these 
presents and for the said Mary Philipse to recover over in value 
against the common vouchee according to the manner and form 
of common Recoverys in such case used, and it is further cove- 
nanted, granted concluded and agreed by and between all and 
every of the said parties to these presents and the true intent 
and meaning of the parties to these presents is that from and 
immediately after the said common Recovery shall be had prose- 
cuted and suffered as aforesaid of the said premises the said 
Recovery shall be and enure and it is hereby declared to have 
been intended to be and enure that the said Thomas Jones and 
all and every other person or persons which shall be seized 
of the premises or any part thereof by force and virtue 
of the said common Recovery shall stand and be seized thereof 
and of every part and parcel thereof with- their and every of 
their appurtenances to the uses following to witt, as for touch- 
ing and concerning one third part (the whole in three equal 
parts to be divided) of all the said lands and premises, to the 
sole and only proper use benefit and behoof of the said Philip 
Philipse, party to these presents of the first part his heirs and 
assigns forever and as for touching and concerning one other 
third part (the whole in three equal parts to be divided) of all 
the said lands and premises to the sole and only proper use 
benefit and behoof of the said Susannah party to these presents 
of the second part, her heirs and assigns forever, and as for 
touching or concerning the remaining third part (the whole in 



GENERAL HISTORY. 47 

three equal parts to be divided) of all the said lands and prem- 
ises to the sole and only proper nse, benefit and behoof of the 
said Mary Philipse party to these presents of the third part her 
heirs and assigns forever and to no other use, intent or purpose 
whatsoever. 

"In Witness Whereof the parties to these present Indentures 
have interchangeably set their hands and seals the day and year 
first above written. 

"Philip Philipse. (L. S.) 

" Susannah RoBiNSox. (L. S.) 
"Willia:m Alexander. (L. S.) 
"Bev. Robinson. (L. S.) 

''Mary Philipse. (L. S.) 

" Thomas Jones. (;L. S.)" 

The role in the action of Thomas Jones against William Alex- 
ander is not on file in New York county or Albany, and the 
only trace of the action of ejectment contemplated in the fore- 
going that has been found is in the rough minutes of the 
Supreme Court of the Province of New York for 1753, where 
the following appears at pages 271 and 292: 

"Mr. Chief Justice DeLancey took his seat on the bench. 



THOMAS JONES, 

Demandanl, 

ar/ainsi 

WILLIAM ALEXANDER, 
Tenant. 



" On writ of entry sur Dissiezin in le jyort for Tenements and 
Commons in Dutchess County. 

"The writ returned and filed, the demandant appears in his 
proper person and prays the tenant may be called. The tenant 
being called appears in his proper person. The demandant 
counts against him. 

"The tenant vouches Philip Philipse to warrant: Philip Phil- 
ipse appears gratis in his proper person. Philip Philipse 
present in Court enters into warranty and prays that the de- 
mandant may count against him, the said Philip Philipse. The 



48 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

demandant counts against Philip Pbilipse. Philip Philipse 
vouches to warrant Beverly Robinson and Susannah, his wife! 
Beverly Robinson and Susannah his wife begin called appear 
gratis in their proper person, and the said Susannah being first 
examined by the Court, the said Beverly Robinson and Susan- 
nah liis wife enter into warranty and pray that the demandmant 
may count against them. The demandmant counts against Bev- 
erly Robinson and Susannah his wife. Beverly Robinson and 
Susannah his wife vouch to warrant Mary Philipse. Mary 
Philipse being called appears gratis in her proper person. 
Mary Philipse present in Court enters into warranty and that 
the demandmant may count against her: the demandmant 
counts against Mary Philipse. Mary Philipse vouches to war- 
rant Thomas Wenman: Thomas Wenman being called, appears 
in his projier person. Thomas Wenman present in Court enters 
into warranty and prays that the demandmant counts against 
him. The demandant counts against Thomas Wenman. Thomas 
Wenman, present in Court, pleads that Hugh Hunt did not dis- 
seize the said Thomas Jones, as by the writ and count it is 
alleged. The demandmant prayed leave toimparle; granted by 
the Court. The Remembrance Roll in this cause marked at the 
bar filled, on which are entered the precipe, writ of entry and 
sheriff's return. Afterwards the demandmant returned into 
Court, and Thomas Wenman being called, did not appear, 
therefore judgment is entered." 

''Present — The Hon. John Chambers, Esq., Second Justice. 

"1 



THOMAS JONES, 

Demandant, 

against 

WILLIAM ALEXANDER, 
Tenant. 



''On the AVrit of Seizin in this cause, the Sherift" of Dutchess 
County, returns that on the second day of August, instant, he 
had caused the demandmant to have plenary seizin of the mes- 
suages, tenements and common in the said write specified with 
the appurtenances. Writ of Seizin with return filed enrollment 



GEN-ERAL HISTORY. 49 

of writ of entry and return recovery. Writ of Seizin and return 
examined and signed by Mr. Justice Chambers are now filed and 
exemplification thereof made and delivered to the demandant." 

The lands were thus freed from the incumbrance of the entail- 
ment and we now have premises owned by Philip Philipse, 
Mary Philipse and Susannah Robinson (wife of Beverly Robin- 
son); each an equal share in fee simple absolute. 

In 1754, Philip Philipse, Mary Philipse and Susannah Robin- 
son divided the tract described in the grant to Adolph Philipse 
into nine lots, and made an actual partition of the same. 

The following is a copy of the partition deed for lot No. 8 
and other lots, executed by Mary Philipse and Susannah Rob- 
inson to Philip Philipse: 

" This Indenture made the seventh day of February in the 
twenty-seventh year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord George 
the Second by the Grace of God of Great Britain France and 
Ireland King Defender of the Faith &c annoq Dom 1754 
Between Beverly Robinson and Susannah his wife and Mary 
Philipse of the first part and Philip Philipse of the Second 
part— Whereas the said Susannah Robinson Mary Philipse and 
Philip Philipse are and Stand seized in Fee Simple in Common 
of all that certain Tract or parcel of Land granted unto Adolph 
Philipse then of the City of New York Merchant by his late 
Majesty King William the third by Letters Patent under the 
Great Seal of the Province of New York bearing date the 
Seventeenth day of June in the Year of Our Lord one thousand 
six hundred and ninety-seven, in Dutchess County Scituate 
lying and being in the High Lands on the East side of Hudson 
River beginning at a certain red Cedar Tree marked on the north 
side of the Hill commonly Called Anthony's Nose, which is 
likewise the North Bounds of Collo Stephanas Van Courtlandts 
land on his Mannor of Courtland and from thence bounded by 
the said Hudson River as the said River runs Northerly until 
it comes to the Creek or run of water called and known by 
the name of the Great Fish Kill to the northward and above the 
said highlands which is likewise the south- ward Bounds of 
another Tract of Land belonging to the said Collo Stephanus 
Courtland and Company and so easterly along the said Court- 
landts Line and the South bounds of Collo Henry Beekman 
until it comes twenty miles or unto the Division or partition 
line between the Colonv of Connecticut and the said Province 



50 HISTORY OV PUTjS-AJI COUNTV. 

and Easterly by the said Division line and bounded northerly 
and southerly by east and west lines unto the said Division line 
Between the said Colony of Connecticut and the province 
aforesaid the whole being bounded westward by the same Hud- 
son River Northward by the land of Coll^ Courtlandt and Com- 
pany and the land of CoUo Beekman, eastward by the partition 
line between the Colony of Connecticut and the Province of 
New York and southerly by the Mannor of Courtlandt to the 
land of the said Collo Courtlandt including therein a certain 
Island at the North side of the said Highlands called pollepels 
Island with the Hereditaments and Appurtenances thereunto 
belono'ino' as by the said Letters Patent Relation being there- 
unto had may more fully and at Large Appear. And Whereas 
the said parties to these presents have by Jonathan Hampton 
their surveyor divided the greatest part of the said Tract or 
parcel of Land and distinguished the same by Lotts made and 
described Signed and delivered to the said Parties by the said 
Johnathan Hampton and left in the hands of Beverly Robinson 
Party hereto for the use of himself and the other parties to 
these presents their Heirs and Assigns when reasonably there- 
unto required by any of the other parties their heirs or Assigns 
and in order to an equal Division of the same have according to 
divers Assortments made by the said Johnathan Hampton 
drawn their several Lotts whereupon the Lots Number Two 
Number Six and Number Eight (Except two thirds of the 
Meadow in the said Lot Number Two hereinafter described) 
protracted and laid down in the said Map do now belong to the 
Lott and share of the said Philip Philipse and are butted and 
bounded as follows, to wit Lott Number Two beginning at a 
pine Tree standing on the East Side of Hudsons River Markt 
P. R. and a heap of stones twenty-two chains below a noted 
Rock called the Old Wife lying in the Mouth of a Brook, which 
is the North west corner of Lott Number one then South sixty 
five degrees East eighty three Chains to a heap of stones on the 
Top of a hill then North Seventy three degrees East one hun 
dred and seventy four chains to a Chestnut tree marked P R 
1753 on the west side standing in the line of Lott Number Four 
on the East Side of a steep Rocky Mountain, and in the North 
east Corner of Lott Number One, from thence North Ten de- 
o-rees east alonir the Line of said Lott number four, three hun- 
dred and fifty-seven Chains to a heap of Stones and a Walnut 



GENERAL HISTORY. i^l 

bush markt P. R. 1753 on a mountain being the Southeast cor- 
ner of Lott number three, then South seventy seven degrees. 
West three hundred and eighty-six chains along the Line of Lott 
number Three to Hudsons River where stands two Hemlock 
bushes marl\t P. R. in a Gully between Ball Hill and Breakneck 
Hill then down the several courses of Hudsons River (Including 
Martler's Rock) to the place where it first began containing 
Eleven thousand six hundred and Forty four Acres. Lott iN'um- 
ber Six beginning at a heap of stones at the Southeast corner 
of Lott Number Five in the line of the Mannor of Courtlandt 
then North Ten Degrees East Nine hundred and sixty chains to 
a heap of stones at-the Northeast Corner of said Lott Number 
Five, then North eighty seven Degrees east Two hundred and 
Thirty nine Chains to a heap of Stones and White Oak Tree 
markt P R 1753 on the West side of a Mountain twenty Chains 
east from John Campbells House, which is the North West corner 
of Lott Number Seven, then South Ten Degrees West nine hun- 
dred and seventy three Chains to a Hemlock Tree markt P. R. 
1763 on the South side of the East Branch of Crotens River and 
a heap of stones on the north side of said Branch in the line of the 
Mannor of Courtlandt at the Southwest corner of Lott Number 
nine then West along the Line of the Mannor of Courtlandt two 
hundred and thirty six Chains to the beginning, containina- about 
twenty two thousand six hundred and thirty three Acrees. Lott 
number eiff7it beginning at a heap of Stones in a Cleared Field 
in the line of Lott number Six being the Southwest corner of 
Lott number Seven then running east three hundred and thirty 
four chains to a large Rock and heap of Stones standing in the 
Road two Chains South from Nathan Burchams House in the 
Oblong line, then Southerly along the Oblong line three hun- 
dred and twenty chains to a Chestnut Bush markt P. R. 1753, 
being the Northeast Corner of Lott Number nine then West 
three hundred and thirty-seven Chains to a heap of Stones and 
Walnut Tree markt P. R. 1753 standing on the South Side of a 
Hill near the Old Meeting House in the line of Lott number six. 
from thence North Ten Degrees East three hundred and twenty 
chains along the line of said Lott number Six to the beginning, 
containing about ten thousand six hundred and thirty five acres. 
Now This Indenture Witnesseth that the parties aforesaid of 
the first part for and in Consideration of Mutual Grants and Re- 
leases from the said Philip Pliilipse to them the said Susannah 



52 HISTORY OF PUTXAM COUNTY. 

Robinson and Mary Philipse and to their Representative Heirs 
and Assigns of Divers other Lotts and Parcels of Lands in and 
by the said recited Letters so as aforesaid Granted and also for 
and in Consideration of the sum of ten shillings to them in hand 
paid by the said Philip Philipse the receit whereof they do here- 
by acknowledge and thereof and therefrom do acquit and dis- 
charge the said Philip Philipse his Executors and Administra- 
tors have granted bargained sold aliened conveyed Released and 
Confirmed and by these presents do Grant Bargain Sell aliene 
Convey Release and Confirm unto the said Philip Philipse his 
heirs and assigns all and Singular those Lotts and parcels of 
Land before mentioned to belong to him the said Philip Philipse 
as they are above and in the said Map described and all and Sin- 
gular the Hereditaments and Appurtnances thereunto belonging 
or in any wise appertaining (Excepting and Reserving out of 
the said Lott number two, two-thirds of the Meadow Land one 
of which two thirds doth belong to the Lott and share of the 
said Susannah Robinson and is butted and bounded as follows 
to witt beginning Ten chains north thirty nine Degrees East from 
a Large Pine Tree standing on a Rocky Point on the South east 
side of the Meadow Markt P. R. 1753 on the West side and from 
thence running North West across Crooked Creek to the upland 
upon Martlers Rock then running southerly along the Edge of 
the Upland to Hudsons River then easterly along Hudsons 
River until the beginning bears North thirty nine Degrees East 
then to the beginning place containing Seventy two Acres and 
the other of which doth belong to the Lott and share of the said 
Mary Philipse and butted and bounded as follows to witt begin- 
ning five chains from the upland upon Danfords Creek five 
chains also from the upland down Crooked Creek to the meadow 
belonging to Lott number one then North west to Martlers Rock 
then along the upland the North side of a little Island in the 
Meadow to the Mouth of Danfords Creek then up the said 
Creek to the beginning containing Eighty two acres) together 
with all the Woods Underwoods Trees Timber Feedings pastures 
Meadows Marshes Swamps ponds Water Courses Rivers Rivu- 
lets Runs and Streams of Water Fishing fowling Hunting Hawk- 
ing (Excepting and Reserving all Mines and Minerals whatso- 
ever) standing growing lying being or found or to be used had 
and enjoyed within the Bounds and Limitts of the respective 
Lotts and parcels of Land above described and mentioned to be 



GENERAL HISTORY. 53 

the Share of and belonging to the said Philip Philipse (except 
and Reserving as before is Excepted and reserved) and all other 
profitts Benefits privileges Liberties Advantages Hereditaments 
and Appurtenances whatsoever unto the said Lotts or parcels 
of Land Eights and Premises and each and every of them be- 
longing or in anywise appertaining as fully and effectually to all 
interests and purposes As by the said Eecited Letters Patent to 
the said Adolph Philipse the same are granted and Conveyed. 
To have and hold the said several Lotts or parcels of Land Right 
and Premises with their and every of their Appurtenances (Ex- 
cept as before is Excepted) to the said Philip Philipse his heirs 
and Assigns to the only proper use benefit and behoof of him 
the said Philip Philipse his heirs and Assigns forever Yielding 
and paying therefor Yearly and every year his proportionable 
part of the Quit rents in and by the said Letters Patent re- 
served at such time and place as by the said Letters Patent is 
directed and appointed And he the said Philip Philipse for him- 
self his heirs Executors Administrators and Assigns doth Cove- 
nant Grant promise and agree to and with the said parties of 
the first part and every of them and every of their Executors 
Administrators and Assigns that he the said Philip Philipse his 
heirs Executors administrators or assigns shall and Yearly and 
every Year forever hereafter well and truly yield render and pay 
or cause to be yielded rendered and paid unto his Majesty his 
heirs and successors at the City of New York on the Annuncia- 
tion of the blessed Virgin Mary the full and equal third part of 
the Quit Rent in and by the said Letters Patent reserved and 
made payable that is to say the Yearly Rent of Six Shillings 
and Eight pence according to the true intent and meaning here- 
of. And further that he the said Philip Philipse shall and will 
from time to time and at all times forever hereafter well and suf- 
ficiently save harmless and keep indemnified them the said 
parties of the first part and each and every of them their and 
each and every of their Goods and Chattels Lands and Tene- 
ments of from and against all costs charges and damages which 
may accrue or which they or either of them their or either of 
their Executors or administrators shall or may happen to sus- 
tain by Reason or means of his the said Philip Phili^Dse not 
paying the said one third part of the said yearly Quit rent as 
aforesaid according to his Covenant and Undertaking aforesaid 
and the true intent and meaning of these Presents. And the 



54 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

said Mary Philipse for herself lier heirs Executors and Admin- 
istrators and the said Beverly Robinson for himself his heirs 
executors Administrators and for the said Susannah his wife do 
Severally and Respectively promise Covenant and agree to and 
with the said Philip Philipse his heirs and assigns that they 
severally have not done any Act Matter or thing whereby the 
premises hereby Granted or Released or any part thereof are or 
may be any ways impeached Charged or incumbered in Title 
estate or otherwise. 

" In Witness whereof the said Parties to these Presents have 
hereunto interchangeably set their hands and Seals the Day 
and Year first above written. 

" Philip Philipse. (L. S.) 

" Bev. Robinson. (L. S.) 

" Susannah Robinson. (L. S.) 
" Mary Philipse. (L. S.) 

" Witnesses. 

" William Livingston. 
" Ebenezer Bryant." 

partition deed to MARY PHILIPSE. 

"This Indenture made the seventh day of February in the 
Twenty seventh year of the reign of our sovereign Lord George 
the Second by the Grace of God of Great Britain France and 
Ireland King Defender of the faith &c Annoq Domini one 
thousand seven hundred and fifty four Between Philip Philipse 
and Beverly Robinson and Susannah his wife of the first part 
and Mary Philipse of the second Part Whereas the said Philip 
Philipse'Susannah Robinson and Mary Philipse are and stand 
seized in ffee simple in common of all that certain tract or par- 
cel of land granted unto Adolph Philipse then of the City of 
New York Merchant by his late Majesty King William the 
third by his Letters patent under the Great Seal of the Prov- 
ince of New York bearing date the seventeenth day of June in 
the Year of our Lord one thousand six hundred and ninety 
seven, in Dutchess County situate lying and being in the high- 
lands on the east side of Hudsons River, beginning at a cer- 
tain red cedar Tree Marked on the north side of the Hill com- 
monly called Anthonys Nose which is likewise the North 
Bounds of Coll-J Stephanus Van Courtlandts Land on his Man- 



GENERAL HISTORY. . 55 

nor ofConrtlandtandfrom thence bounded by the said Hudsons 
River as the said River runs northerly until it comes to the 
Creek River or Run of Water called and known by the name 
of the great Fish Kill to the ^S'orthward and above the said 
highlands which is likewise the Southward Bounds of another 
Tract of Land belonging to the said Collo Stephanus Courtlandt 
and Company, and so Easterly along the said Courtlandts line 
and the south bounds of Collo Henry Beekmaii until it comes 
twenty Miles or unto the Division or partition Line between 
the Colony of Connecticut and the said Province, and Easterly 
by the said Division Line, and being bounded northerly and 
southerly by East and West Lines unto the said Division Lines 
between the said Colony of Connecticut and the Province afore- 
said, the whole being bounded Westward by the said Hudsons 
River, Northward by the land of Collo Courtlandt and Com- 
pany and the land of Collo Beekman, eastward by the partition 
line between the Colony of Connecticut and the Province of New 
York, and Southerly the Mannor of Courtlandt to the land of 
the said Collo Courtland, including therein a certain Island at 
the north side of the High Lands called Polepels Island, with 
the Hereditaments and Appurtenances thereunto belonging as 
by the said Letters Patent relation being thereunto had may 
more fully and at large appear. 

''•And Whereas the said Parties to these Presents have by 
Jonathan Hampton their Surveyor divided the greatest part uf 
the said Tract or parcell of land and distinguished the same by 
Lotts made and Described, signed and delivered to the said 
parties by said Jonathan Hampton and left in the hands of 
Beverly Robinson party hereto for the use of himself and the 
other parties to these Presents their Heirs and Assigns when 
reasonably thereunto required byanj^of the other parties, their 
lieirs or assigns and in order to an equal Division of the same 
have according to divers assortments made by the said Jona- 
than Hamilton drawn their several Lotts. Whereupon the Lotts 
numbered Three, number Five Number Nine and one third part 
of the Meadow Land Lying in Lott Number Two pretracted 
and lay'd down in the said Map do now belong to the Lotts and 
share of the said Mary Philipse and are butted and bounded to 
Witt, Lott number Three beginning at Two Hemlock Bushes 
standing in a gully between Bull and Breakneck Hills on the 
East side of Hudsons River, and from thence running North 



56 . HISTORY OF PUTJiAM COUNTY. 

seventy seven degrees East three hundred and eighty six chains 
to a heap of stones and walnut bush Markt P. R. 1753 standing 
in the West Line of Lott number four and is also the northeast 
corner of Lott number Two, then North ten Degrees East two 
hundred and twenty eight chains to a heap of stones thirty 
links north of a white oak tree Marked P 1753 being the North 
West corner of Lott Number four, then South eighty seven 
Degrees West four hundred and eight chains to the mouth of 
the Fish Kill from thence down the Several Courses of Hud- 
sons River to the beginning, including Pollaples Island, con- 
taining about eight thousand six hundred acres. Lott number 
five beginning at a heap of Stones in the line of the Mannor of 
Courtlandt at the Southeast corner of Lott number four, then 
North ten degrees East nine hundred and forty seven Chains to 
a heap of Stones at the North East Corner of Lott number four, 
Then North eighty seven Degrees East three hundred and forty 
four chains to a heap of stones which is the North West corner 
of Lott number Six Then South Ten Degrees West along the 
Line of Lott Number Six nine hundred and Sixty Chains to a 
heap of Stones in the line of the Mannor Courtlandt at the 
South West corner of Lott number Six, Then West along the 
line of the Mannor of Courtlandt Three hundred and forty 
Chains to the beginning, containing about thirty one thousand 
two hundred acres. Lott number nihe beginning at a Hemlock 
Tree standing on the south side of the East Branch of Croton 
River and a heap of stones on the North side which is also the 
South east corner of Lott Number six in the line of the Man- 
nor Courtlandt, from thence running North Ten Degrees East 
three hundred and Thirty three Chains to a heap of stones and 
Walnut Tree Marked P. R. 1753 on the south side of a Hill 
near an Old Meeting House in the line of Lott number Six 
being the South West corner of Lott number Eight, then East 
Along the Line of Lott number eight three hundred and Thirty 
Seven Chains to a Chestnut Bush Markt P. R. 1753 Standing 
in the Oblong line on the West Side of a Rocky Hill which is 
the Southeast Corner of Lott Number eight, then southerly as 
the Oblong line runs Three hundred and thirty three chains to 
the North East Corner of the Mannor of Courtlandt in Peach 
Pond, then West along the said Mannor of Courtlandt Three 
hundred and thirty six chains to the beginning. Containing 
about eleven thousand two hundred and twenty acres. And 



GENERAL HISTORY. 67 

one third part of the meadow Land lying in Lett Number Two, 
Beginning Two chains from the upland upon Danfords Creek 
and running to Crooked Creek five Chains from the upland then 
down Crooked Creek to the Meadow belonging to Lott Number 
one then North West to Martlers Rock, then along the upland 
the North side of a little Island in the Meadow to the Mouth of 
Danfords Creek, then up the said Creek to the beginning, con- 
taining about eighty two acres. Now this Indenture Witness- 
eth that the parties aforesaid of the first part for and in con- 
sideration of mutual Grants and Releases from the said Mary 
Philipse to them the said Philip Philipse and Susannah Rob- 
inson and to their respective Heirs and Assigns of Divers other 
Lotts and parcels of land in and by the said recited Letters 
Patent so as aforesaid Granted and also for and in Consideration 
of the sum of Ten Shillings to them in hand paid by the said 
Mary Philipse tlie receit whereof they do hereby acknowledge 
and thereof and therefrom do acquit and discharge the said 
Mary Philipse her Executors and Administrators Have Granted 
Bargained Sold aliened Conveyed released and Confirmed and 
by these Presents do Grant bargain Sell Alien convey Release 
and confirm unto the said Mary Philipse her heirs and Assigns 
all and singular those Lotts and Parcels of Land before men- 
tioned to belong to her the said Mary Philipse as they are 
above and in the said Map described and all and Singular the 
Hereditaments and Appurtenances thereunto belonging or in 
anywise appertaining with all woods underwoods Trees Timber 
Feedings Pastures Meadows Marshes Swamps Ponds Pools 
Water Water Courses Rivers Rivulets Runs and Streams of 
Water Fishing Fowling Hunting Hawking (Excepting and re- 
serving all Mines and Minerals Whatsoever) standing Growing 
lying being or found or to be used had or enjoyed within the 
Bounds and Limits of the Respective Lotts and parcells of Land 
above described and mentioned to be the share of and to belong 
to the said Mary Philipse and all other profits benefits privi- 
leges Libertys advantages Hereditaments and Appurtenances 
whatsoever unto the said Lotts or parcells of Land rights and 
premises and each and every of them belonging or in anywise 
Appertaining as fully and Effectually to all intents, and purposes 
as by tlie said Letters Paten"; to tlie said Adolph Philipse the 
same ure Gi'anted and conveyed To have and to hold the said 
sevei'al Lorrs or parcells of Land rights and premises with their 



58 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

and every of their Appurtenances Except as before is Excepted 
to the said Mary Philipse her heirs and Assigns to the only 
proper use benefit and Behoof of her the said Mary Philipse 
her heirs and Assigns forever Yielding and paying therefore 
yearly and every year her proportionable part of the Quit Rents 
in and by the said Letters Patents reserved at such time and 
place as by the said Letters Patent is directed and appointed 
And she the said Mary Philipse for herself her heirs Executors 
Administrators and Assigns doth Covenant Grant promise and 
agree to and with the said parties of the first part and every of 
them and every of their heirs Executors Administrators and 
Assigns that she the said Mary Philipse her heirs Executors 
Administrators or Assigns shall and Will Yearly and every 
year forever hereafter well and truely yield render and pay or 
cause to be Yielded rendered and paid nnto his Majesty his 
Heirs and Successors at the City of New York on the Feast day 
of the Annunciation of the Blessed Virgin Mary the full and 
equal third part of the Quit Rent in and by the said Letters Pat- 
ent reserved and made Payable, that is to say the yearly Rent 
of six shillings and eight pence according to the true intent and 
meaning hereof, and further that she the said Mary Philipse 
shall and Will from time to time and at all times Forever here- 
after Well and sufficiently save harmless and keep indempni- 
fied them the said Parties of the first I'art and Each and every 
of them their and each and every of their goods and Chattels 
Lands and Tenements of from and against all costs Charges and 
Damages which may accrue or which they or either of them 
their or either of their Executors or Administrators shall or 
may happen to sustain by reason or means of her the said Mary 
Philipse not paying the said one third part of the said yearly 
Quit rent as aforesaid according to her Covenant and Under- 
taking aforesaid and according to tlie true intent and meaning 
of these Presents. And the said Philip Philipse for himself 
his heirs Executors and Administrators and the said Beverly 
Robinson for himself his heirs Executors and Administrators 
and for the said Susannah his Wife do Severally and respec- 
tively Promise Covenant and Agree to and with the said Mary 
Philipse her heirs and Assigns that they severally have not done 
any Act Matter or thing whereby the Premises hereby Granted 
or Released or any part thereof are or may be anyways im- 
peached charged or incumbered in Title Estate or otherwise. 



GENERAL HISTORY. 59 

" In Witness whereof the said Parties to these Presents have 
hereunto Interchangeably set their hands and Seals the day and 
year first above written. 

" Philip Philipse. (L. S.) 

" Bev. Robinson. (L. S.) 

" Susannah Robinson. (L. S.) 
'' Mary Philipse. (L. S.)" 

PARTITION deed. 

" Mary Philipse and Philip Philipse to Beverly Robinson and 
Susannah Robinson. 

"This Indenture, made the seventh day of February, in the 
twenty-seventh year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord George 
the Second, by the grace of God, of Great Britian and Ireland 
and France King, defender of the faith, etc., Annoque. Domini 
1754, between Philip Philipse and Mary Philipse of the first 
part, and Beverly Robinson and Susannah, his wife of the 
second part. Whereas the said Philip Philipse, Susannah 
Robinson and Mary Philipse are and stand seized in fee simple 
in common, of all that certain tract or parcel of land granted 
unto Adolph Philipse, then of the City of New York, mer- 
chant, by his late Majesty, King William the Third, by his 
letters patent under the great seal of the Province of JSTew 
York, bearing date the seventeenth day of June, in the year 
of our Lord, one thousand six hundred and ninety-seven, in 
Dutchess County, scituate, lying and being in the highlands on 
the east side of Hndson River, beginning at a certain red cedar 
tree marked on the east side of the hill, commonly called An- 
thony's Nose, which is likewise the north bounds of Coll. 
Stephen Van Courtlandt's land or his manor of Courtlandt and 
thence bounded by the said Hudson's Rivei", as the said river 
runs northerly until it comes to the Creek, river, or run of water 
called and known by the name of the Great Fishkill river, to 
the northward and above the high lands which is likewise the 
southward bounds of another tract of land belonging to the 
said Coll. Stephanus Courtlandt and Company, and so easterly 
along the said Courtlandt line and the south bounds of another 
tract of land belonging to the said Coll. Stephanus Courtlandt 
and Company, and so easterly along the said Courtlandt line 
and the south bounds of Col. Henry Beekman, until it comes 
twenty miles or unto the division or partition line between the 



60 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COU:N'Ty. 

Colony of Connecticut and the said Province, and easterly by 
the said division line, and being bounded northerly and south- 
erly by east and west lines, unto the said division line between 
the said Colony of Connecticut and the Province of New York 
aforesaid, the whole being bounded westward by the same 
Hudson's river, northward by the land of Coll. Cortlandt and 
Company and the land of Coll. Beekman, eastward by the 
partition line between the Colony of Connecticut and the Prov- 
ince of New York, and southerly by the manor of Cortlandt, 
to the land of the said Coll. Cortlandt, including therein a 
certain island at the north side of the said high land called 
Pollepels Island, with the hereditaments and appurtenances 
thereunto belonging as by said letters patent relation being 
thereunto had, may more fully and at large appear. 

"And whereas the said parties to these presents have, by 
Jonathan Hampton, their surveyor, divided the greatest part of 
the said tract or parcel of land, and distinguished them by lots 
made and described, signed and delivered to the said parties by 
the said Jonathan Hampton, and left in the hands of Beverly 
Robinson, party hereto, for the use of himself and other par- 
ties hereto, their heirs and assigns, when reasonably thereunto 
required by any of the other parties, their heirs and assigns, 
and in order to an equal division of the same have, according 
to divers assortments made by the said Jonathan Hampton 
drawn their several lotts thereupon the lotts number one, num- 
ber four and number seven, and one third part of the meadow 
land lying inlott number two protracted and laid down in the 
said map do now belong to the lott and share of the said 
Susannah Robinson, and are butted and bounded as follows, to 
wit: lot number one, beginning on the east side of Hudson's 
river at the north side of Anthony's Nose, at the corner of the 
Manor of Courtlandt, and running east along the line of the 
said Manor three hundred and sixty chains to a white oak tree 
marked with P. 1758, on the north side, then north ten degrees, 
east three hundred and forty chains to a chestnut tree marked 
P. R., 1753. on the west side, standing on the east side of a 
steep, rocky mountain (which is the southeast corner of lott 
number two) then south seventy-five degrees, west one hundred 
seventy-four chains to a heap of stones on a high hill, then 
north sixty-five degrees, west eighty- three chains to a pine tree 
standing by said Hudson's river, marked P. R., by a heap of 



GENERAL HISTORY. 61 

Stones twenty two chains below a rock called and known by the 
name of the Old Wife, lying in the mouth of a brook, then 
down the several courses of Hiidson's river to the place where 
it first began, containing nine thousand nine hundred and 
eighty-four acres. Lot number four, beginning at the aforesaid 
white oak tree marked P. 1753, standing on the line of Manor 
of Courtlandt three hundred and sixty chains, east from Hud- 
son's river at the beginning of lott number one on the north 
side of Anthony's Nose, and which is also the southeast corner 
of said lot number one, and from thence running north ten 
degrees, east nine hundred and twenty-five chains to a heap of 
stones thirty links north from a white oak tree marked P. 1753, 
on the south side, which is the northeast corner of lot number 
three and is four hundred and eight chains (on a north eighty- 
seven degrees east course) from the mouth of the Fishkill, 
thence north eighty-seven degrees, east four hundred and three 
chains to a monument made with a heap of stones, which is the 
northwest corner of lott number five, thence south ten degrees, 
west nine hundred and forty-seven chains to a heap of stones in 
the line of the Manor of Courtlandt which is also the southwest 
corner of lot number five, then west along the line of said 
Manor, four hundred chains to the beginning, containing thirty- 
seven thousand acres. Lott number seven, beginning at a white 
oak tree marked F. E. 1753, and a heap of stones on the west 
side of a hill twenty chains east from John Campbell's, being 
the northeast of lot number six, then running north eighty- 
seven degrees, east three hundred and thirty-six chains to a 
heap of stones in the oblong line in a road near Justice Havi- 
land's, thence southerly along the oblong line three hundred 
and thirty-eight chains to a large rock and heap of stones 
standing in the road about two chains south from Nathan Bur- 
cham's house, then west three hundred and thirty-four chains 
to a heap of stones standing in a cleared field in the lirte of lott 
number six, then along the said line of lott number six, north 
ten degrees, east three hundred and twenty chains to the begin- 
ning, containing ten thousand nine hundred and twenty-two 
acres, and one-third part of the meadow"land lying in lot num- 
ber two, beginning ten chains north, thirty-nine degrees east 
from a large pine tree (standing on a rocky point on the south- 
east side of the meadow) marked P. R. 1753, on the west side 
and from tlience running northwest across a crooked creek to 



62 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

the upland upon Martlers Eock, then running southerly along 
the edge of the upland to Hudson's river, then easterly along 
Hudson's river until the beginning bears north thirty-nine 
degrees east, then to the beginning place, containing seventy- 
two acres; now this Indenture witnesseth that the parties afore- 
said of the first part, for and in consideration of mutual grants 
and releases from the said parties of the second, to them the 
said Philip Philipse and Mary Philipse, and to their respective 
heirs and assigns, of divers other lots and parcels of land in 
and by the said recited letters patent so as aforesaid granted 
and also for and in consideration of the sum of ten shillings 
to them in hand paid by the said parties of the second 
part, the receipt whereof they do hereby acknowledge 
and thereof and therefrom do acquit and discharge the 
said parties of the second part, their executors and 
administrators, have granted, bargained, sold, aliened, 
conveyed, released, and confirmed and by these presents 
do grant, bargain, sell, alien, convey, release, and confirm 
unto the said Susannah Robinson, her heirs and assigns 
all and singular, those lots and parcels of land above-mentioned 
to belong to the said Susannali Robinson as they are above and 
in the said map described, and all and singular the heredita- 
ments and aj^purtenances thereunto belonging or in any wise ap- 
pertaining, together with all and singular the woods, under- 
woods, trees, timbers, feedings, pastures, meadows, marshes, 
swamps, ponds, pools, waters, watercourses, rivers, brooks, riv- 
ulets, runs and streams of water, fishing,fovvling, hunting, hawk- 
ing (excepting and reserving all mines and minerals whatsoever), 
standing, growing, lying, being or found or to be used, had or 
enjoyed, within the bounds and limits of the respective lotts or 
parcels of land above described and mentioned to be the share 
of and to belong to the said Susannah Robinson, and all other 
profitts, benefits, privileges, liberties, advantages, heredita- 
ments and appurtenances whatsoever unto the said lots or par- 
cels of land, rights and premises, and each and every of them 
belonging or in any wise appertaining as fully and effectually 
to all intents and purposes, as by the said recited letters patent 
to the said Adolpli Philipse, the same are granted and conveyed, 
to have and to hold the said several lotts and parcels of land, 
rights and premises, with their and every of their appurtenances 
(except as before is excepted) unto the said Susannah Robinson, 



GEXEKAL HISTORY. 63 

her heirs and assigns to the only proper use, benefit and behoof 
of her the said Susannah Robinson, her heirs and assigns for- 
ever. Yielding and paying therefore yearly and every year her 
proportionate part of the quit rents, in and by the said letters 
patent reserved at such time and place as by the said letters 
patent is directed and appointed. And the said Beverly Rob- 
inson, for himself, his heirs, executors, administrators, and as- 
signs, and for the said Susannah, his wife, doth covenant, grant, 
promise and agree to and with the said parties of the first part, 
and every of them, and every of their heirs, executors, admin- 
strators and assigns, that she, the said Susannah Robinson, her 
heirs, executors, administrators or assigns, shall and will yearly 
and every year forever hereafter, well and truly yield, render 
and pay or cause or procure to be yielded, rendered and j^aid 
unto his Majesty, his heirs, and successors, at the City of New 
York on the Feast Day of the Annunciation of the blessed 
Virgin Mary, the full and equal third part of the quit rent in 
and by the said letters patent, reserved and made payable, that 
is to say, the yearly rent of six shillings and eight pence, ac- 
cording to the true intent and meaning hereof. And further 
that the said Susannah Robinson shall and will from time to 
time, and at all times forever hereafter well and sufficiently save 
harmless and keep indempnified, them, the said parties of the 
first part, and each and every of them, their,' and each and 
every of their goods, and chattels, lands and tenements, of from 
and against all costs, charges and damages which may accrue or 
which they or either of them, their, or either of their executors 
or administrators shall or may happen to sustain by reason or 
means of her the said Susannah Robinson, not paying the said 
one-third part of the said yearly quit rent, as aforesaid, accord- 
ing to his, the said Beverly Robinson's covenant and undertak- 
ing aforesaid, and the true intent and meaning of these jores- 
ents, and the said parties of the first part, for themselves sev- 
erally and respectively, and for their several and respective heirs, 
executors and administrators, do promise, covenant and agree 
to and with the said parties of the second part, that they sever- 
ally have not done any act, matter or thing whereby the prem- 
ises hereby granted or released, or any part thereof are or may 
be anyway impeached, charged or incumbered in title, estate or 
otherwise howsoever. In witness whereof, the parties to these 



64 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COU^VTY. 

presents have hereunto interchangeably set their hands and 
seals, the day and year first above written. 

'• Philip Philipse. (L. S.) 

" Bev. Robinsox. (L. S.) 

" Susannah Robinson. (L. S.) 

" Mary Philipse. (L. S.)" 

The foregoing deeds are all recorded in the office of the secre- 
tary of State, in Albany. It will be noticed that all the mines 
and minerals are reserved in each of the deeds, and consequently 
they remained undivided property. It is upon this reservation 
that the claim of the present representatives of the Philipse 
family to one-third of the minerals in the county is based. 

On the 20th of February 1754, Susannah Robinson and Bev- 
erly Robinson executed a deed conveying to William Living- 
ston " all the lands set apart to Susannah Robinson by jiarti* 
tion deeds, except mines and minerals." Two days later 
William Livingston conveyed the same to Beverly Robinson, 
and he remained the owner till the Revolution. 



CHAPTER V. 

THE WAPPINGER INDIANS AND THEIR CONTROVERSY WITH 
THE HEIRS OFADOLPH PHILIPSE. 

WHEN the white men first landed on American soil, they 
found the land inhabited by a race whose Crispin is 
wrapped in utter obscurity. The most extended researches of 
the antiquarian and philologist have failed to cast any certain 
light upon this problem, and whence came the red man is as 
much a question now, as it was in the days of Columbus. To 
narrate the various theories and speculations upon this subject 
would require a volume. Some have endeavored to prove by 
learned argument that in them are found the lost tribes of 
Israel; others, led by the fancied analogy of a few w(>rds in 
their language, have given ready faith to the belief that they 
are the descendants of a Welsh colony, transported to these 
shores in a day long gone by, and in a manner utterly un- 
known. That they are the offspring of tribes, who, in ages past, 
by some means found a passage to the New World by the way 
of Behring's Strait, has not failed to find believers; while others 
still, desiDairing of finding any reasonable proof of their migra- 
tion from other continents, have yielded to the conclusion that 
they are aboriginal inhabitants of the soil, and the veritable 
children of what the Greeks were so fond of calling, " All-pro- 
ducing earth," and "Earth mother of all things." All these 
varied speculations we will leave to those who delight in the 
unknown and the marvelous; it is enough for us to know the 
simple story of the tribe who once owned the land we now in- 
habit, but have passed away, leaving but the shadow of a name. 
The vessel which bore the great navigator Hudson had scarcely 
entered the Narrows, when there came on board the natives of 
the newly discovered land, ''clothed in mantles of feathers, 
and robes of fur, the women clotlied in hemp; red co^^per to- 



CO 



HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 



bacco pipeH, and other things of copper they did wear about 
their necks." They evidently came with thoughts of peace 
for " of arms they brought none," bat still "' he did not trust 
tiiem." A boat which he sent up the river the next day was at- 
tuf'ked on its return, and one of the English sailors, John Cole- 
man, was killed by an arrow shot in his throat. He was buried 
on the adjacent beach, and was the first white victim of an In- 
dian weapon, in the region of the Hadsun. On his voyage 
UP the river he met with many tribes and seems to have received 
a cordial welcome. When he had passed through the High- 
lands on his return his vessel was becalmed opposite Stony 
Point, and then "the people of the mountains" came on 
board' and "wondered at the ship and the weapons." One 
canoe came to the stern, and its occupant was detected in steal- 
ing "a pillow and two shirts and two bandeliers." A well di- 
rected shot struck him in the breast and he was killed. When 
they had continued their voyage and were near Manhattan 
Island, another conflict occurred, and a volley of arrows fired 
at the ship was returned by a discharge of musketry "which 
killed two or three of them :" and thus the first chapter of the 
liistory of New York was stained with blood, and a war began 
which with occasional intervals of partial peace, continued till 
the native tribes were so utterly extinguished that to-day the 
few relics of the race are objects of interest and curiosity. 

The Indians who inhabited the shores of the Hudson Kiver 
wore of one race and of one language, with the exception of 
fjli'vlit dialectic peculiarities. Under the name of Algonquins, 
we'i-e included the various tribes that inhabited New England, 
Lon"- Ishinil, the eastern portion of New York and regions to 
the south. The tribe that claimed the land now embraced in 
Dutchess and Putnam and extending to the north as far as 
Uo(4oir Junsen's Kill, in Columbia county, were known as the 
AVappinger.s, a name which appears under several different 
forms. The affidavit of King Nimham, dated October 13th, 1730, 
stales that " the deponent is a River Indian of the tribe of the 
Wappi"'"'^' which tribe was the ancient inhabitants of the 
oasrorn shore of Hudson's river, from the city of New York to 
about the middle of Beekmans Patent," that "another tribe 
of Hiver Indians called the Mahiccondas were the ancient in- 
li;il)itants of the remaining eastern shore of the river, and these 
two tril)es constituted one nation."" They were in fact one of 



GENERAL HISTORT. 67 

the tribal divisions of the Mahicans, whose name is known, not 
only in the prosaic pages of history, but is embellished with all 
the charms of romance, by the matchless genius of the greatest 
of American novelists. 

The Wappingers were divided into chieftaincies, and of these 
one was the Nochpeems,' who were said to occupy the high- 
lands north of Anthony's Nose. Van der Donck, one of the 
earliest writers of this portion of the countr\% assigns them 
three villages on the Hudson; Keskistkonck, Pasquasheck and 
jS'ochpeems; but their principal village was Canopus, which was 
situated in a valley. which is one of the most important topo- 
graphical features of Putnam county, and known as Canopus 
Hollow. The principal residence of the tribe was north of the 
Highlands, and on the borders of the Wappingers Creek; but 
that they were generally included in the name of Highland In- 
dians, is shown by a sentence in a letter from Governor LcJ've- 
lace to Governor Winthrop, December 29th, 1669: 

" I believe I can resolve your doubt concerning what is meant 
by Highland Indians amongst us. The Wappingers and Wick- 
eskect, etc., have always been reckoned so." 

Of all their possessions there are but few perfect transfer 
titles on record and one is a deed by which " Sackereghkigh for 
himself and in the name of Megrieskin Sachem of the Wap- 
pinger Indians," and other Indians sold the land included in the 
Rumbout Patent. The original deed by which the land in Put- 
nam county was conveyed to Borland and Seabrant, who trans- 
ferred their title to Adolph Philipse, is still in existence, and 
our knowledge of the facts connected with it is derived not 
only from this, but from the statements made in the documents 
concerning the claim of the Sachem David Nimham. All men- 
tion of this tribe seems to indicate that they were of a warlike 
and savage nature. At the time of the outbreak of war against 
the Dutch, in 1643, "Pachem a crafty man, ran through all the 
villages urging the Indians to a general massacre." "The first 
aggressive act was by the Wappingers, who seized a boat coming 
from Fort Orange, killed two men and took four hundred 
beaver skins." It was only after a sanguinary struggle that the 
various tiibes were subdued, and in 164.T, a treaty was concluded 
between the Dutch and the various River Indians, among whom 
were included the " Wappinex." This treaty continued till the 

' Rutteiilwi-, " Indian Tribes of Hudson's River," page SO. 



68 HISTORY OF PUTXAM COUNTY. 

time of the English conquest, though they were frequently en- 
couraged to unite with other tribes in a general revolt. After 
the conquest of 1664, every effort was made by the English to 
remove the cause which had led to so much trouble under the 
Dutch, and one agreement, which was of the greatest import- 
ance, was that no purchase of land of the Indians should be 
esteemed a good title, without leave first had and obtained from 
the governor, and that after such leave the purchaser should 
bring before the governor "the Sachem or right owner," to 
acknovvledge satisfaction and payment, when all proceedings 
should be entered on record, and constitute a valid title. Their 
adherence to the English is shown by the fact that, in the war 
with the French, in 1689, the Wappingers or "Indians of the 
long reach " as they were called, accepted an invitation to take 
part in the war, and with their head sachem and all the males 
of the tribe able to bear arms, went to Albany and thence to the 
field. Throughout the long struggle between the French and 
English, the Wappingers bore an important part. Moving their 
families to Stockbridge, they furnished a corps of about three 
hundred in the war of 1754, and after the war " they demanded 
restitution from the Abenaquis for the loss of one of their 
number, and delayed the consummation of peace with them till 
1762." In 1774, Governor Tryon writes: 

" The river tribes have become so scattered and so addicted 
to wandering that no certain account of their numbers can be 
obtained. These tribes, the Wappingers of Dutchess county, 
etc., have generally been denominated River Indians and con- 
sist'of about three hundred fighting men. Most of these people 
at present pi-ot'ess Christianity and as far as in their power 
adopt our customs, the greater part of them attended the army 
in the late war." 

As the name of Wappingers has passed into history, it may 
be proper here to add a word as to its origin and significance. 
The name has been greatly corrupted from its original form. It 
is supposed to be derived from the words Wahum, east; and 
aol-i, land or place; and as applied to the Indians themselves 
may be rendered Eastlanders, or men of the east. 

After the peace a remnant of the tribe returned to the vicinity 
of its old abiding place, and found the whole region sparsely 
settled by tenants of the landed proprietors to whom the lands 
had been granted by the crown. There was no place in wliich 
they could stay in peace. The good lands had of course been 



GENERAL HISTORY. 69 

the first to be occupied by the whites, whose advancing settle- 
ments elbowed the Indians out of all except the rocks and 
morasses. Whether, strictly speaking, the Indians were 
wronged may be a question. But they were destitute, and saw 
themselves more and more closely hemmed in by those who 
occupied the lands they had once possessed. And, sometimes 
aided by sympathizing whites, too often instigated by designing 
ones, such was the basis of the controversies that long dis- 
turbed the frontier. With regard to the Philipse settlements 
these were of great historic interest. Upon the return of the 
Wappingers in 1762, they found their lands in possession of 
the heirs of Adolph Philipse. Some of the papers relating to 
the controversy are still in existence in the office of the secre- 
tary of State and in the papers of the Philipse family, and as 
they have never appeared in print, no apology is offered for 
presenting them somewhat in full. In addition to the state- 
ment of the claims certain incidental allusions throw great light 
upon the early settlement of the eastern portion of the county. 
About 1763 a number of the Philipse tenants renounced their 
leases and, taking others from the Indians, continued to occupy 
the land but refused to pay rent to those claiming under the 
patentee', vvho brought ejectment and succeeded in ousting the 
occupants. But the defeated tenant was invariably irresponsible, 
the Indians more so, and, though successful from a legal point 
of view, the Philipse representatives found themselves put to 
great and increasing harrassment and expense. Suits at law 
having thus proved an inefficient remedy, under advice of their 
counsel, William Livingston and James Duane— both soon to 
become so famous— they decided to appeal to the Chancery 
jurisdiction. Under the then charter the Governor in Council 
constituted the High Court of Chancery of the colony. And on 
the 6th day of February, 1765, was presented to this tribunal 
the petition, an abstract of which is given in the minutes of the 
Council, from which the following is taken : 

'' At a Council held at Fort George in the City of 
New York on Wednesday the sixth day of Feb- 
ruary, 1765. 

Present 
The HonoWe Cadwallader Colden, Esqr Lieut. Governor &ct. 
Mr. Horsmandeii iNIr. Walton 

:Mr. Smith Mr. Delancey 

Mr. Watts Mr. Reade. 



70 illSTORY OF PUTNAJt COUNTY. 

" The Petition and Memorial of Roger Morris, Beverly Rob- 
inson, and Philip Philipse, Proprietors and Owners of a Tract 
of Land granted by the Letters Patent of his late Majesty King 
William the third, under the Great Seal of this Province, 
bearing date the 17th day of June 1697, unto Adolph Philipse 
late of the City of New York deceased, lying in the County of 
Dutches, and farther bounded, as by the said Letters Patent 
may Appear: Was laid before tlie Board and Read; Setting 
forth, That one Samuel Monroe, who formerly setled a part of 
the said Tract of Land, as Tenant under the said Adolph 
Philipse, combining with several other Persons, and particu- 
larly with Stephen Wilcocks and Charles Peck, how to distress 
the Memorialists, hath lately Spirited up several Indians, to lay 
claim to the said Tract of Land, as the native and Original Pro- 
prietors thereof, under the pretence that the same was never 
Xjarchased from the Natives, and that the said Indians are the 
true Owners thereof, and have a Right to Grant and dispose of 
the same Notwithstanding any Grant or Patent from the Crown. 
That the said Samuel Munroe and his Confederates, did cause 
the said Indians to elect hira their Attorney and Guardian, to 
enter upon and take possession of the said premises, and to 
lease lett and sell the same. Who in pursuance thereof, had by 
Publick Advertisement notifyed a Time and place, for persons 
to appear to be informed as to the Reality of the said Indian 
Claim; and to take Leases of the said Lands; and that in Con- 
sequence thereof sundry persons residing within the Bounds of 
the said Tract of land, and others, have appeared and were offered 
Leases by the said Samuel Munroe for 99 Years for any Farms 
within the same; and that the said Samuel Munro, together 
with Nimham the principal of the said Indians, threatens to 
turn every person ref useing such Leases, out of possession. By 
means whereof several of the Memorialists Tenants have been 
induced to take and hold under such Leases, and others who 
setled without Leases, refuse to take Leases from the Memori- 
alists, but claim to hold as tenants to the said Indians, hoping 
by their Strength and Numbers to dispossess tlie Memorialists 
of the said Tract of Land. And that as the proceedings of the 
said Samuel Munroe and his Confederates, do manifestly tend 
to the Disinherison of his Majesty; and the Memorialists cannot 
apply any adequate Remedy in the Common Course of the 
Law — The Memorialists therefore humbly pray the Interposi- 
tion of this Board and such Relief in the premises as to his 
Honour shall seem tit and reasonable. 

"On reading whereof It is ordered that the said Petition be 
referred to the Gentlemen of the Council or any three of them, 
Avhereof one of the Judges to be one." 

The committee thus appointed made a report to the Governor 
in Council March Gth, 1765, from which the following is quoted: 



GENERAL HISTORY. 71 

" May it please Your Honour. 

"In Obedience to your Hononr's Order in Council of the sixth 
of February Instant, referring to a Committee of the Gentlemen 
of the Council, or any three of them, whereof one of the Judges 
to be one, the petition and Memorial of Roger Morris, Beverly 
Robinson and Philip Philipse * * * * the Committee hav- 
ing maturely weighed and considered the same, humbly beg 
leave to report to Your Honour 

"1st. That it appears to this Committee that the Tract of 
Land mentioned in the said Petition and Memorial, was duly 
purchased of the Natives, and does now belong to the said 
Memorialists, who have within the Bounds thereof a considera- 
ble Number of tenanted Farms and Improvements. 

" 2dly. That on the seventeenth Day of November last, five 
Indians, known by the Names of Stephen Kounhum, Daniel 
Nimham, One-pound Packtown, Jacob Aaron, and Jacobus 
Nimham, did chuse and elect one Samuel Monroe of Dutchess 
County aforesaid, by an Instrument in Writing of that Date, 
their Attorney, and Guardian of their Persons and Estates, for 
them to enter upon and take possession of their Messuages 
Lands, Tenements, Hereditaments and Premises, in the said 
County of Dutchess, and the Profits thereof to take, till they 
shall be better capable of transacting their own Affairs, and that 
the Messuages Lands, Tenements Hereditaments and Premises, 
meant and intended by the said Instrument, are contained within 
the Bounds of the said Patent, and claimed by the said Indians, 
as the native Ownei'S and ])roprietors thereof, and without any 
Grant or jwtent from the Crown. 

"3dly: That in order to give the greater Weight to the said 
Instrument, it was taken and acknowledged by the said Indians, 
before Jacobus Terboss, one of the Judges of the Court of Com- 
mon Pleas for the said County of Dutchess, and John Akin, 
one of his Majesty's Justices of the Peace for the said County, 
and by them allowed and subscribed, which api^ears to this 
Committee such an Abuse of their respective Offices, and so 
dangerous a precedent for encouraging Indian Claims against 
the Rights of the Crown, and in Disinherison of his Ma'jesty, 
that the Committee is humbly of Opinion, that an Order of Your 
Honour in Council ought to be served on the said Terboss and 
Akins, for them to shew Cause why they ought not to be dis- 
placed for such Misconduct 

"4thly: That the said Daniel Nimham, one of the Indians 
above mentioned, did some time in June or July last give a 
Lease to one Stephen Wilcocks for the Lands, 'on which the 
said Wilcocks then lived, lying within the Bounds of the said 
Letters Patent, for nine hundred and ninety-nine Years, and 
that the said Samuel Monroe and Stephen Wilcocks, at the same 
tinie entered into an Obligation to the said Daniel Nimham. to 
defend his Title, as a Nalive Indian to the said Lands. 



72 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUXTY. 

" 5tli]y: That Daniel Monroe, Son of the said Samuel Monroe, 
and one Joseph Craw, have also taken two several Leases, from 
the said Daniel Nimham for two several Farms, lying within the 
Bounds of the said Letters Patent, and severally entered into 
Obligations to him, for the payment of their respective Rents. 

"6thly: That it further appears to the Committee, that the 
said Samuel Monroe, has at a Publick Meeting of many People, 
on the Subject of the said Indian Claim, read or cause to be 
read Your Honours Proclamation grounded on his Majesty's ad- 
ditional Instruction, relative to Lands reserved by Indians, 
and insisted that the said Proclamation extended to' and sup- 
ported the aforesaid Indian Claim. And that it also appears to 
us, that the said Samuel Monroe has caused Copies of the said 
Proclamation to be publickly fixed up, to countenance and give 
Colour to the said Claim, has openly and repeatedly avowed, 
that he mantained the said Indians Claim, and declared that the 
same was well founded, that the Claim to those holding under 
the said Patent from the Crown to the said Adolph Philipse 
was without Title, laboured to convince their Tenants, that they 
would be rained, and threatned the said Tenants with Ruin, 
if they continued to hold under their said Landlords. 

"7t'hly: That by reason of the above Practices of the said 
Samuel 'Monroe, and the Indians aforesaid, and his Abuse and 
Perversion of the said Proclamation, great Numbers of persons 
resideing within the Bounds of the said Patent, are deluded 
into a Belief of the Validity of an Indian Title against the 
Grants of the Crown, which by stirring up the Indians to simi- 
lar Claims, may be attended with Dangerous Consequences to 
the peace and' Tranquility of the Province, and greatly dis- 
courage the farther Settlement and Improvement of the Country 

•' Sthly: The Committee humbly conceive that the said Sam- 
uel Monroe, in granting Leases for any Lands within the Bounds 
of the said Patent, as Attorney and Guardian to the said In- 
dians as Native proprietors thereof, And the said Daniel Mon- 
roe, Joseph Craw and Stephen Wilcocks by accepting Leases 
from the said Indians for Lands already patented by the Crown, 
do in Fact set up the Title of the Natives as paramount to the 
Rights of the Crown, and to the Disinherison of his Majesty, 
and have thereby been Guilty of a high Misdemeanor, and that 
the said Samuel' Monroe and Stephen Wilcocks, by their oblig- 
ing themselves to defend such Indian Titles and Claims, and the 
safd Daniel Monroe, Joseph Craw and Stephen Wilcocks in ac- 
cepting the said Leases are Gailty of Maintenance and punish- 
able at the Suit of the King 

"That the Committee therefore in Vindication of his Majes- 
ty's undoubtnd Right to all the Lands in his Dominions as Su- 
pVeme Lord whichls presumptuously impeached by such jire- 
tended Title advise your Honour to direct his Majesty's Attorney 



GENKUAL HISTOUY. 73 

General to exhibit; Informations in thie Supreme Court against 
the said Samuel Monroe, Daniel Monroe, Stephen Wilcox and 
Joseph Craw for their respective Offences aforesaid 
" All which is nevertheless submitted. 

" By Order of the Committee 

" DaNL: HORSSrANDEN 

"Chairman. 
"New York the 6th March, 1765." 

The Minutes of the Council proceed: 

" Which Report on the Question beins: put was af2;reed to, and 
approved of. And it is ordered by his "Honour the Lieutenant 
Governor with the Advice of the Council, that a Copy of the 
said Report of this Order be delivered to his Majesty'^s Attor- 
ney General, and that he do forthwith exhibit Informations 
against Samuel Monroe, Daniel Monroe, Stephen Wilcox and 
Joseph Craw named in the said Report, for the Matters therein 
particularly mentioned." 

Meanwhile the Indians had not been idle. There was no pos- 
sible defense to the proceeding instituted by the Philipse heirs. . 
The prerogative of the Crown was held sacred and the produc- 
tion (jf the royal grant an absolute bar at law and in equity to 
any proceeding in derogation of the title purporting to be there- 
by granted, excejit one— an appeal to the representative of the 
crown, and, upon suggestion of abuse of the royal conlidence, 
a proceeding to have the patent annulled by a new exercise of 
the prerogative. The Indians seem to have been well advised, 
and such an appeal was made, as the following shows: 

(LAjS'D papers XVIII, 127.) 

" To the Honorable Cad walladerColden, Esquire his Majestys 
Lieutenant Governor and Commander in Chief of the Province of 
New York, and the Territories depending thereon in America. 

" The Petition of David Nimham, Jacobus Nimham, One 
Pound pocktwo Stephen Cowenham, and other Native Indians 
of the the Tribe of Wappinger. 

" Most Humbly Sheweth 

"That they and their Tribe for Time Immemorial, by their 
Native Right have been in possession of certain Tracts of Land 
Scituate lying and being in the Southermost part of Dutchess 
County; adjoining the Northermost part of Westchester County, 
both within the province of New York; which right Your pe- 
titioners are come down with their proper Vouchers and Evi- 
dence to satisfy your Honor touching the reality thereof. 

" That tiie cause of this application is owing fo the Encroach- 
ment (jf several persons, who have for a Series of Time past. 
Step I)y Step, very illegally seated tliemselves upon and do now 



74 HISTORY OF PUTNAM CUUXTY. 

occupy and possess the said Tracts of Land, to the Manifest 
Wrong and Injury of your petitioners and contrary to the 
especial Orders and directions of the British Crown; coniphiint 
whereof hath often been made by the said Tribe without Redres. 

" That the Rise and Foundation of your Petitioners past and 
present complaints, are chiefly from a Patent which appears on 
Record in the Secretary's office in Lib. No. 7, -page 119, bearing 
Date the Sixteenth Day of Jane One Thousand Six Hundred 
and Ninety- Seven, whereby the Land so claimed by your Peti- 
tioners to these first Rights and property is granted to Adolph 
PhilijDse; the description of which said' Land in and by the 
Abstract hereunto annexed fully appears. 

" That your Petitioners utterly deny those lands were ever 
purchased of their Tribe, for any valuable or other considera- 
tion whatever by the said Adolph Philipse; and therefore said 
Patent must have been by some misrepresentation (with respect 
to any legal purchase) unfairly obtained, to the great disturb- 
ance and annoying your Petitioners in the the peaceable and 
quiet Enjoyment thereof. 

• " Tliat your petitioners are a Tribe (with humble Submission) 
well known to have at all Times demeaned themselves in a de- 
cent becoming manner, and have on all occasions, to the utmost 
of their power and ability, at the risque of their Lives, assisted 
in defending the Territories of their dignified King and 
Governor, who by his Royal proclamations from Time to Time 
issued, hath promised protection to the i)ersons and Property 
of your Petitionei's. 

" Who Therefore in the most supplicant manner, thus per- 
sonally present and lay before Your Honor as His Majesty's 
representative this their Complaint and great Grievance, firmly 
relying on your protection, direction and Assistance as far as 
. consistent in your Honour's wise Judgment; and agreeable to 
his Majesty's Instruction in his Royal proclamation, given at 
St. James the ninth Day of December One Thousand Seven 
Hundred and Sixty-one, and in the Second Year of his Reign, 
for which voiir Petitioners as in Humble Datv bound will ever 
Pray &c. 

" New \ork, Unvch 1st, 17Go. his 

" Daniel X Nimham. 

" Your Honor will be pleased mark 

to observe that there are several his 

of yonr petitioners Evidences at- " Oxi-: Pound X Pocktone. 
tending (with tliemselves) at a mark, 

very great Expense therefore his 

your petitioners liumbly sue for " Jacobus X Nimiiam. 
vour Honours answer. mark 

his 
"■ Stkimiex X KOWXIIAM."' 
mark. 



GENERAL HISTORY. 75 

Proceedings in Chancery were more summary then than in 
later days. The Fhilipse representatives were summoned 
forthwith and a trial immediately had. The occasion was a 
dramatic one. The Lieutenant-Governor presided, and about 
him sat his council, the magnates of the province, including the 
Earl of Stirling and the Judges of the Supreme Court. Nimham, 
the Indian King, appeared in person with his principal subjects, 
and was assisted by Munroe. Roger Morris and Beverly 
Robinson appeared in person for the representatives of the 
patentee; and then and there was summarily decided the claim 
upon which the survivors of the great Wappinger nation had 
staked their last chance for a foothold in the land their an- 
cestors had ruled. No other description can be so graphic as 
the Minutes of the Council. We quote: 

" At a Council held at Fort George in 
the City of New York on Wednesday 
the sixth day of March, 1765. 
Present: 

" The Honb'e Cadwallader Colden, Esqr. Lieut. Governor, &c. 
Mr. Horsmanden, Mr. Delancev, 
Mr. Smith, Earl of Sitrlfng, 

: .;. ,:. ' . ■■ Mr. Watts, Mr. Reade, 

" Mr. Walton, 

" His Hono4ir the Lieutenant Governor laid before the Board a 
petition of Daniel Nimham, Jacobus Nimham, One Pound Poc- 
tone. Stephen Cowenham, and other Native Indians of the Tribe 
of Wappinger, "Setting forth, that they and their Tril)e for 
Time immemorial by their Native Right, have been in possession 
of certain Tracts of Land in the Southernmost part of Dutches 
County, adjoining the Northernmost part of \Vestchester 
County. * * * * 

" On reading whereof the four Indians named in the Petition 
were called in, together with Samuel Munroe their Guardian 
who attended with them. And Roger Morris and Beverly 
Robinson, who hold lands under the said Patent, being also 
present the said Indians were asked what they had to say or 
to produce in Support of their Claim. Whereupon Daniel. 
Nimham who spoke for himself, and interpreted what the 
rest said, informed the Council they claimed the Lands 
under their Ancestors who had never sold them. The said 
Beverly Robinson then produced an Original Deed, signed by 
Tachquararos, Cowenhahum, Siengham, Shavviss, Sipowerak, 
Cramaracht, Wassawawogh, and Mecopap Native Indians and 
proprietors of sundry tracts of Land in Dutches County, bear- 
ing Date the 13th August 1702, sealed and delivered*^ in the 
presence of J.Y. Cortlandt, William Sharpas, Philip Van Cort- 



76 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

landt, Blandiena Bayard, and of three Indiaas subscribiug 
Witnesses thereto, whereby the said Indian Grantees convey 
all their Right and Title" to the Lands therein mentioned 
(being the same Lands, and described in the same Words as 
those Granted by the Patent aforesaid) to the said Adolph 
Phiiipse and to his heirs and Assigns for Ever. And the Names 
of the said Lidian Grantees being repeated to the Petitioners 
present, the petitioner One Pound poctone, who declared him- 
self to be eighty Years of Age said he knew them all— And the 
Board knowing the four Witnesses first named to have been 
principal People at the Time of the Transaction; and the Hand 
Writing of William Sharpas one of the Witnesses, and who ap- 
pears to have wrote the Deed, being well known, His Honour the 
Lieutenant Governor informed the Petitioners, that himself and 
the Gentlemen of the Council were of Opinion, that their An- 
cestors had fairly sold their Right to the Lands in Question. 
That they as their Descendants had no Claim to the Lands, and 
that they should give the Proprietors or their Tenants no farther 
Trouble, but suffer them to remain quiet and unmolested in the 
Possession of what so clearly appeared to be their Property." 

Beaten, but not discouraged, the Indians attempted to secure 
the assistance of Sir William Johnson who had so successfully 
intermediated in controversies between the Indian tribes and 
the English. But he declined to interfere. Nimham then 
went to England and presented his claims to the Lords 
of Trade, who communicated in regard to the matter with 
the Colonial Governor, Sir Henry Moore. In his report 
to the Lords of Trade Governor Moore wrote that the 
proceedings lately had in regard to the Wappinger Indians had 
been " thoroughly examined in the presence of a great con- 
course of people." In this examination they had been given 
every opportunity and no advantage was taken of technical 
points or their ignorance of legal matters. He also reports that 
in 1766, riots had occurred in Dutchess connty, and great 
disturbance, the Indians being at the bottom of it. It was re- 
ported, and he believed with truth, that the Indians were in the 
•habit of selling their lands over and over again, to any who 
were willing to purchase. The Lords of Trade also reported in 
regard to the petition of the Indians. The substance of the re- 
port was a relation of the claims as narrated in preceding pages. 
It is also stated that the Indians had previously chosen a guar- 
dian, and brought their case before the courts, and were defeated 
in the trial; that they had then appealed to the Governor and 
Council, who reported tliat the claim was groundless and that 



GENERAL HISTORY. 77 

the lands were fairly sold. It seems that at the time of this re- 
port, 1766, there were "four Indian men and three women " in 
England and that others had been there the previous year. 

On the 22d of December, 1766, Governor Moore reported that 
the Indians had been "forcibly putting some poor peoj^le out 
of possession of their houses," and had a second time been 
committing disorders. This probably refers to some difRculties 
with tenants who held land under the title of the Philipse 
family. When he inquired of the Indians why they had gone 
to England, they replied that " they were persuaded by some 
people to take the voyage, it was no project of their own." The 
governor also rej^orted that " Manroe, their guardian had been 
guilty of many misdemeanors, and had broke out of Gaol, and 
is, by all accounts I can obtain, as infamous a person as can be 
found in this Colony." It is evident that in his opinion it was 
time a check was put upon affairs of this kind, " to which the 
Indians were incited by white people living near." 

There are still extant the briefs of both parties to these pro- 
ceedings and many miscellaneous papers incidentally furnish- 
ing data upon the settlement of the county. For example, 
among the witnesses whom Nimham stated could testify in re- 
gard to his claims were John Van Tassel " of Philipse Upper 
Patent;" Elijah Tompkins, "East end and opposite of Philipse 
Patent;" Samuel Field, "on the Oblong"; John Tompkins, 
" on Philipse Patent; " David Paddock, " ditto; " Henry Fer- 
nander, "upper part of gore joining Fishkill;" Peter Ange- 
vine, "about middle of Philipse Patent;" Richard Curry, 
William Hill, Jacobus Terbush, "commonly styled Judge Bush, 
at the Fishkill; " James Dickenson, Esq., "East end of Pat- 
ent;" James Philipse, "living about the middle of Cortlandts 
Manor." On the Philipse side there was filed the affidavit, 
which we quote : 

"City of New York, ss.: 

"Timothy Shaw of Dutchess County being duly sworn de- 
posethand saith that he formerly was a Tenant under Adolph 
Philipse, deceased within the Patent commonly called the Up- 
per Patent in the County aforesaid being the Lands now claimed 
by Roger Morris Philip Philipse and Beverly Robinson Under 
the said Adolph Philipse as this Deponent has iinderstood. 
That he this Deponent has now no Interest in any Lands in the 
said Upper Patent having disposed of all his Interest therein 
upwards of seven Years ago. That he this Deponent is very 



78 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

well acquainted with all the Settlements that have been made 
within the Bounds of the said Upper Patent and has been ac- 
quainted with all the Settlements within the Same about or 
near twenty-five Years last past. That at the Time this 
Deponent first became acquainted with the said Upper Patent 
the following Persons were either settled thereon or held as he 
understood from them as Tenants under Adolph Philipse to 
wit: Philip Miuthorne Elisha Tom kins John Tomkins Wil- 
liam Hunt Daniel Townsend John Dickenson James Dicken- 
son John Sprague William Sturdivant One Hill Moses Nor- 
throp Senior Thomas Philipse George Hughson James Mc- 
Cready Samuel Fields Amos Dickenson Hezekiah Wright, 
Jeremiah Calkins John Calkins Joseph Porter Ichabod Vic- 
kerey Ebenezer King Samuel Jones James Paddock Peter 
Paddock David Paddock John Barley Caleb Brundige Wil- 
liam Brandekey John Eagleston Two Brothers of the name of 
Bircham OneKire William Kabelay Thomas Kirkam Na- 
thaniel Robinson One Cole William Smith John Smith Na- 
thaniel Underbill Edward Stevens One Bartwo John Reynolds 
and as this Deponent verily believes several others whose names 
he does not now recollect. That since the Time of his Settle- 
ment on the said Upper Patent a great Number of other Per- 
sons many of whose names this Deponent could repeat were it 
necessary have also settled themselves as Tenants of the Philipse 
Family within the said Upper Patent and this Deponent verily 
believes that of such Tenants tliere were upwards of three hun- 
dred settled on the said Patent beyond the distance of three 
Miles from Hudson's River before the Tear one thousand seven 
hundred and fifty six. That either two or three years ago in 
the "Winter Season the said Philip Philipse was at the House of 
Uriah Lawrance one of the Tenants of the said Upper Patent 
where Daniel Nimham the Indian together with at least three 
hundred Persons chiefly Tenants of the said Patent under the 
Philipse Family were assembled. That the said Philip Philipse 
then and there in the Hearing of this Deponent and as many of 
the said Persons there assembled as could conveniently crowd 
near enough to hear what passed asked the said Nimham where 
the Lands were which He claimed whereupon the said Nimham 
said that he had no Lands upon which the said Philip Philipse 
asked the said Nimham why he made such a Rout among the 
Tenants to whicli the said Nimham answered that he was told 
to do so by Stephen Cowenham and one Pound two other Indi- 
ans That the said Nimham never to this Deponent's Knowl- 
edge lived within the Bounds of the said Patent and that all 
the Indians who formerly lived in the said Patent had aband- 
oned it long before the Tear one thousand seven hundred and 
fifty six and went and settled themselves as this Deponent has 
been informed beyond Minisink near Delaware and further this 
Deponent saith not 



GENERAL HISTORY. 



79 



•Timothy X Shaw 
mark 



" Sworn this6l;li dav his 

of March, 1767, ' 

" Before me 
"Danl Horsmaxden." 

And, keeping in mind the object, and naturally one-sided char- 
acter of the documents, the briefs are scarcely less valuable. 
From that tiled on behalf of Nimham the following extracts are 
taken: 

"A Brief Statement of a Oontroversy subsisting between 
Daniel Nimham a native Indian and an acknowledged Sachem 
or King of a Certain Tribe of Indians known and called by the 
name of the Wappinger Tribe of Indians and others of the same 
Tribe Petitioners in behalf of themselves and the rest of the said 
Tribe and the heirs and legal Representatives of Mr. Adolph 
Philipse, late of the City and Province of New York, de- 
ceased, * * * 

" This Tribe formerly were numerous, at present consists of 
about Two Hundred and Twenty seven Persons; they have al- 
ways had a Sachem or Indian King, whom they have acknowl- 
edged to be the head of said Tribe and to whose Government 
they have submitted; and by a Line of Succession the said 
Government descended to the said present Sachem, they have 
for more than a Century been distinguished for their steady 
friendship and 11 rm alliance with the English, and their subjec- 
tion to the Crown of Great Britain; * * * 

'•Their Claim to that part of the above described premises 
liath been uninterrupted and a Considerable part thereof for 
many Years been under actual improvement and occupation bv 
them and their Tenants; and they the said Tribe actually did 
inhabit and improve 
said Land by leases on 
rents and for their hunt- 
ing Ground &g^ agree- 
able to their manner of ^1 
Life until the Coni-V?l 
mencement of the late 
War; at which time they ■ 
entered in the Service of 
the British Crown, were 
conducted forth into 
the wars by their pre- 
sent Sachem, who then 
being in the Prime and 
Vigor of Life went in 




T-^ -ia^c/ 



Ccrv>PVyl£>,\y^^ 



'^ 



Capacity of Captain in defence of the British Crown taking 
under liis Command all the Males of said Tribe, that were then 
able and any suitable for said service they fii-st having re- 
moved their ""Wives, Children and aged Persons to a Place 



80 HISTORY OF PUT:;iAM COUNTY. 

called StorJvbridge, that they might the more easily be provided 
for & better accommodated during their absence, and the said 
Captain with his Company aforesaid, continued in the service 
aforesaid during the whole Term of the late War and behaved 
valliantly and was eminently serviceable in the Reduction of 
Canady to the British Crown. * * * 

"The late war being Ended the said Tribe returned home, 
when to their great surprise they found such Encroachments on 
their Improvements, and such destruction on their hunting 
Grounds, that they were obliged to seek for Refuge elsewhere. 
The said now Sachem sometime afterwards having received some 
Intelligence of his Majesty's proclamation respecting Indian 
Claims again however took Courage and having first upon ad- 
vice andby and with the approbation of the Chief Judge of the 
Court of Common Pleas and one other Justice of the Peace for 
said County of Dutchess Chosen Mr. Samuel Munroe for his 
Guardian; he with said Guardian again Leased out sundry farms 
on said Land in Controversy, not in the least doubting his right 
so to do. Whereuijon (the said Frederick Philipse being dead) 
Mr. Beverly Robinson of sd. New York having married one of 
the Daughters of Frederick Philipse deceased & pretending to 
be interested in the Lands in Controversy after having in a 
forcible manner attempted to oust the said Tenants who held 
under said Tribe and after much of his disrespectful Conduct 
both toward his King and Country, as appears by the exhibits 
M. N. O. brouglit cases of Ejectment against fifteen of the said 
Indian Tenants and they being chiefly poor people, unitedly 
agreed to stand Trial in only one of them, and having raised a 
sum of Money for that purpose, the Defendant in that particu- 
lar suit made application for Council to assist him therein but 
upon Enquiry (to his great surprise) found that every Attorney 
at Law in that whole Province was previously retained on the 
other side; whereupon (being destitute of assistance) at the time 
of trial he motioned the Court for Liberty to speak for himself; 
which being Granted hebegaq to offer something in Vindication 
of his Cause but had scarsely uttered one single sentence, when 
one of the Lawyers rose up and (^interrupting him) with an air 
of Confidence declared he was liable to be committed for pre- 
tending to offer a word in Vindication of a claim to those Lands 
in opposition to a Grant of the Crown, which struck such a 
sudden Damp upon the spirits of the poor Man, that he was 
unable further U) Conduct his Cause with any manner of prop- 
riety, or so much as to tell his plain honest story, wdiich might 
have shew perhaps the Justice of his cause and jirevented a 
Recovery. But without further delay or any further Enquiry 
into the'AIatter, Judgment was forthwith rendered in said Cause 
and in the rest of said cases against all the said fifteen Defend- 
ants without any o[)portunity of a fair Trial, and thereupon 
writs of possession Granted out against them all. and the whole 



GENERAL HISTORY. 81 

number of fifteen Tenants aforesaid, some of which had been 
on said Lands Thirty and some Forty Years, holding under said 
Tribe turned off therefrom and their Buildings and other Im- 
provements together with the Crops of Grain &c they had been 
growing on said Lands and all the fruits of their Labour & 
Industry taken from them without any manner of allowance 
therefor. Whereupon the said now Sachem together with some 
other principal men of said Tribe finding, that said Robinson 
and the rest of the heirs and legal representatives of the said 
Mr. Frederick Philipse deceased were determined to continue 
their molestations and to use all possible endeavors surrepti- 
tiously to defraud them of their native right to said Lands pre- 
ferred their petition to the Honorable Cadwallader Golden Esqre 
Lieutenant Governour and the Commander in Chief of said 
Province of New York and his Council dated the first day of 
March Anno Domini one thousand seven hundred and sixty-five, 
as per Exhibit No. F. and on the sixth of the same March afore- 
s'aid, the Petitioners aforesaid together with said Guardian, were 
permitted to appear and did personally appear before said 
Lieut. Governour & Council, in order to be heard in the Matters 
prayed for in their said Petition respecting said Lands and the 
Encroachments thereon made as aforesaid and (not able to get 
any assistance of any attorney at Law in the whole province 
aforesaid) then and there laid in their Claim to said Land in 
Controversy themselves and then and there stood ready to offer 
sufficient Evidence in support of their said Claim and then and 
there expected to have had opportunity therefor: But instead 
thereof no more was then and there done in the premises, than 
as follows, viz.: 

" The Petitioners being asked by one of the Gentlemen of the 
Council then and there present, what they had to offer in sup- 
port of their Claim aforesaid ''. the said now Sachem who spoke 
for himself and Interpreted what the rest said, informed the said 
Lieut. Governour & Council, that they the said petitioners in 
behalf of themselves and the rest of the said Wappinger Tribe 
claimed the Lands in Controversy under their ancestors, in 
whom was the native right and that neither they nor their an- 
cestors nor any of said Tribe had ever sold, nor made any legal 
Conveyance of said Land in Controversy. The said Mr. Robin- 
son then produced an Instrument said to be an Indian Deed, 
bearing date the tliirteenth day of August one thousand seven 
hundred and two, which (if authentic) covered all the Lands in 
Controversy. But as this was the first Time that such Instru- 
ment was ever heard of the Petitioners and said Guardian de- 
sired to look at said Instrument and having got the same into 
his hand was about to point out some marks of fraud attending 
it, but before he had time to make one single remark about it7 
it was by a Gentleman of the Council taken out of his hands. 
and thereupon the said Gentleman of the Council told the Peti- 



82 HISTOEY OF PUTN'AM COUNTY. 

tioners they had better go home about their business and quiet 
themselves and the rest of said Tribe and give them no further 
Trouble for (said he) Mr. Robinson has a Deed of ail the Lands 
in Controvers3^ to which the said now Sachem replyed, that he 
chose to hear those words from the Lieutenant Governour's own 
mouth first: whereupon the said Lieut. Governour after a short 
Pause said that the said Mr. Robinson had a Deed of the Land in 
Controversy and that the Petitioners must therefore go home and 
make themselves and the rest of their Tribe easy and quiet and 
not give the said Governour and Council any further Trouble in 
the premises, (having first asked an old Indian, one of the Peti- 
tioners, whether he ever knew any of those Indians whose 
names were subscribed to said pretended Deed, who replyed 
that he did, but that he never knew nor heard of their selling 
or making any Conveyance of said Lands, neither did he believe 
that they or either of them ever signed or executed said Instru- 
ment) whereupon the Petitioners (tho' very much dissatisfied 
on account of the rough Treatment they met with, as well as on 
account of their not being permitted a fair Chance or oppor- 
tunity to Vindicate their Cause) returned home." * * * * 

" Finally it seems that such a notable Transaction could not 
have been performed in the Dark nor have been so soon forgotten 
by the Indians, especially considering that they depend wholly 
upon Tradition for the Record (if it may be so called) of all their 
proceedings, and are therein so extremely careful, as that they 
do thereby retain among them for many Centuries together, the 
knowledge or remembrance of matters of much less Importance — 
From all of which Circumstances the said Tribe of Wappingers 
do firmly believe the said Instrument of one thousand seven 
hundred & Two to be spurious and not by any means Genuine 
and humbly imagine said Lands (if at all included in said 
Patent) Avere Granted to said Mr. Adolph Philipse by the letters 
patent aforesaid thro' mistake or by means of some misrepre- 
sentation; and therefore hope with great Humility, that their 
Honest Cause will gain the Royal Attention and powerful In- 
terposition and Protection; and that they maybe again restored 
to their said Lands, whereupon they are unjustly expelled. 

" The foregoing Brief or State of the Case of the Wappinger 
Tribe of Indians was made on the 30th day of October Anno 
Domini one thousand seven hundred and sixty-five." 

From the brief submitted by the Philipse representatives is 
taken the following: 

"A Summary of the Reasons humbly offered to his Excel- 
lency Sir Henry Moore Baronet Captain General &- Governour 
in Chief in & over the province of New York & the Territories 
thereon depending in America, &c., &c., &c.. and to the Hon- 
ourable his Majesty's Council for the said province by Roger 
Morris Beverly Robinson & Pliilip Philipse * * * in answer 



GEXERAL HISTORY. 83 

to a certain Memorial or Complaint of l)aniel Nimliam,an Indian, 

"The said Roger Morris, Beverly Robinson and Philip 
Philipse, tho' they firmly rely on their indisputable title to the 
sd. lands as derived by them Under the said Letters Patent 
Think it nevertheless their Duty however repeatedly called upon 
to satisfy the Governm't of the Integrity not only of their own 
Conduct but also of the Conduct of those under whom they 
Claim, as well as in obtaining the said Letters Patent for the 
said Tract of Land as in possessing the same by Virtue of such 
Letters patent. 

" The patent appears to be grounded on a petition of Adolph 
Philipse wherein the Fraud (if any had been perpetrated in ob- 
taining the patent) would naturally be found But this petition 
which is still lodged in the Secretary's office speaks in plain 
Terms and sets forth a purchase made by him of Jan Seabringh 
and Lambert Dorlandt of part of the Lands contained within 
the Bounds of the afsd Patent (a part of which the said Me- 
morial & Complaint admits to have been granted by the In- 
dians to the said Seabringh & Dorlandt) to wit for an Extent 
from the River Eastward as far as the Land of Coll Cortlandt 
ct Company (meaning the patent commonly called Rombouts 
Patent) which was known to the Govt, to extend only sixteen 
Miles from the River And the Colony Line was also known to 
the Governm't to be at the Distance of 20 Miles from the 
River. So that the petitioner having set forth nothing more 
than the purchase aforesaid and so framed his petition as clearly 
to Shew a Vacancy between that purchase & the Colony Line 
for which he did not pretend to have made an Indian purchase 
the Crown could not be deceived in the Grant of the said Let- 
ters Patent & therefore no Reason can be assigned why they 
should be at this late day impeached or Questioned: And that 
the more especiall because: 

"2dly. The Letters Patent themselves contain no recitals or 
suggestions of matters of fact as urged on the part of the pe- 
titioner to the Govt, to induce the Crown to grant them; But 
appear to have issued simply on the petition of Patentee praying 
a Grant of the Lands without any matters of fact urged by him 
to induce such Grant. Wherefore * * * the Letters Patent 
above mentioned issued in favor of the said Adolph Philipse 
without the least Colour or Ground for supposing a Deceit on the 
Ci'own in the obtaining the same" the title in the sd Roger Morris 
Beverly Robinson and Philip Philipse must be conclusive. * '^ 
* and' if anything in Equity is now due the Indians the Crown 
stands bound to satisfy them* 

"8dly. The said Adolph Philipse tho he might have relied 
on his patent,* made a purchase of all the Lands included with- 
in the Bounds of this patent of them on the loth Augt. 1702 



84 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

and to prevent Every suspicion that Fraud, or Art was used to 
obtain this Deed, It will be sufficient to observe that Besides 
three Indians who were Witnesses to it this Transaction was at- 
tested bv Jacobus Van Cortlandt a Man of Rank & Character, 
William' Sharpas the Then Town Clerk of the City of New York 
—a person of known probity, Philip Van Cortlandt then one 
of his Majesty's Council of this Province & Blandina Bayard an 
Indian Interpretress. Some of these witnesses are personally 
known & the handwriting of one of them subscribed to this 
Deed was familiar to several of the Members of this Board * * * 
the Rank & Characters of the witnesses are sufficient to remove 
all suspicion that it was illegally Fraudulently & surreptiti- 
ously obtained. * * * * 

" 4thly. * * Those who were acquainted with the Indians 
their principles and practices know that tho' theywill very rarely 
suffer themselves to be defrauded of their Lands; yet in most 
instances they compel bona fide purchasers by Repitition of their 
Claims to make repeated payments to them; beyond the original 
Consideration Money 

'^Sthly. (Here follow references to papers, including the affi- 
davit of Timothy Shaw.) 

" From All which Considerations * * * it must clearly ap- 
pear That the patent to Adolph Philipse was not unfairly 
obtained nor the Said Deeds executed to him by the Indians, 
procured illegally, fraudulently & surreptitiously, nor the 
Lands possessed by the Indians until 1756. Nor the possession 
of them then wrongfully gained by the said Beverly Robinson 
Philip Philipse and Roger Morris while the Indians were gone 
into his Majesty's Service * * * But on the contrary the said 
Patent was fairly obtained without any Imposition on the Govt. 
That the Indian Deed was procured by the said Adolph Philipse 
lawfully, honestly & openly before Witnesses of the first Char- 
acter " * * & that the said Adolph Philipse & his family so 
far from suffering their Title to Lands in Question to become 
Stale and suspicious by Non occupancy proceeded in due time 
to the settlement k Cultivation of these Lands, which were popu- 
lously inhabited by Tenants under them many Years since & and 
which were long ago abandoned by the Indians who were con- 
scious that they had not the least Right or Title to them." 

In the Revolution Nimham and his warriors took an active 
part. Some sixty of them, expert marksmen and skilled in war, 
joined the American forces and fought with a bravery and valor 
worthy of their ancient race, in the days of their glory. Active 
in the campaigns of 1777, they joined Washington again in the 
spring of the following year, and were detached with the forces 
under La Fayette, to check the depredations of the British army 
on its retreat from Philadelphia, and they were afterward trans- 



GENERAL HISTORY. 85 

ferred to Westchester county, the scene of some of the most 
hotly contested struggles of the war. 

It was on the 30th of August, 1778, that Nimham and his 
warrior band went forth to the field of their last battle. On 
that day they met with a scouting party of British under Colo- 
nel Emerick, and after a tierce engagement compelled them to 
retreat. On the following morning the whole of the British 
force at Kings Bridge was ordered out and the larger part was 
placed in an ambuscade, while Emerick was sent forward to de- 
coy his assailants of the previous day. In the extreme northern 
part of the annexed portion of the city of New York, is a high 
elevation of land, known as Cortlandt's Kidge. Winding 
through the valleys and emptying into the Harlem River, near 
Kings Bridge, is a stream that has borne from the earliest times 
the name of Tippets Brook. The wooded heights and the 
banks of the stream were the scenes of a most sanguinary con- 
flict. The attempt to draw the Indians into the ambuscade 
failed, and upon their advance the British troops had scarcely 
time to fall into rank. The Indians lined the fences and com- 
menced firing upon the forces under Colonel Enierick. The 
Queen's Rangers moved rapidly to gain the heights, and Tarle- 
ton advanced with the Hussars and his famous Legion of Cav- 
alry. This being reported to Lieutenant-Colonel Simcoe, he 
directed Major Ross to conduct his corps on the heights, and 
advancing to the road arrived within ten yards of Nimham and 
his men. Up to this time they had been intent on the attack 
upon Colonel Emerick. Tliey now gave a yell and fired on the 
advancing enemy and wounded five, including Colonel Simcoe. 

They were driven from the fence, and Tarleton rushed upon 
them with his cavalry and pursued them down Cortlandt"s 
Ridge. Here Tarleton himself had a narrow escape. Striking' 
at one of the fugitives, he lost his balance and fell from his 
horse. Fortunately for him the Indian had no ba^^onet and his 
musket was discharged. A captain of a company of American 
soldiers was taken prisoner with some of his men, and a company 
under Major Stewart, who afterwards distinguished himself at 
the storming of Stony Point, left the Indians and tied. The en- 
gagement was renewed with the fiercest vigor. The cavalry 
charged the ridge with overwhelming numbers, but were bravely 
resisted. As the cavalry rode them down, the Indians seizing 
their foes, dragged them from their horses, to join them in death. 



86 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

In a swamp, not far from the brook, Nimham made his last 
stand. When he saw the Grenadiers closing upon him and all 
hope of successful resistance gone, he called out to his people 
to flee, but as for himself, " I am an aged tree, I will die here." 
Being attacked by Simcoe he wounded that oificer, but was shot 
and killed by Wright, his orderly Hussar. In this fearful fray 
the power of the tribe was forever broken. More than forty of 
the Indians were killed or desperately wounded in the fight, and 
when the next morning dawned, there, still and cold in death, 
on the field he had defended so bravely, lay the last sachem of 
the AVappingers. 

The place where they crossed Tippets Brook is still known as 
Indian Bridge, and an opening in the Cortlandt woods yet bears 
the name of Indian Field, and there the dead were buried. It is 
said that the spirit of the sachem still haunts the field of his 
last battle, and that the sound of his war cry still rises on the 
midnight air, and greets the ear of the belated traveller as he 
treads on his lonely way. 

From that time the Wappingers ceased to have a namein his- 
tory. A few scattered remnants still remained, and as late as 
ISll, a small band had their dwelling place on a low tract of 
land by the side of a brook, under a high hill, in the northern 
part of the town of Kent,' but all that remained of them have 
long since passed away, and the fjlace that knew them once will 
know them no more forever. 

A person who stands on the high land in Carmel, south of 
Lake Gleneida, sees far to the northwest, three lofty mountains 
that tower above all the country round. To the middle peak, 
which is the highest, we have given the name of the last Sachem 
of the tribe that once ruled all the lands that can be seen from 
'its highest summit: and we trust that in honor of his valor, and 
of the faith sealed with his blood, on the field where he fought 
for the liberty of America, it will bear to all future time the 
name of Mount Nimham. 

'The site of this village is on the farm of Isaiah Booth, about half a mile south 
of the Putnam county road, near the west line of Lot 5. 



CHAPTER VI. 

CONFISCATION AND SALE OF THE SHARES OF THE PATENT 
BELONGING TO SUSANNAH ROBINSON AND MARY PHILIPSE. 

SEVERAL years previous to the death of lier father, Susan- 
nah Philipse was united in marriage to Col. Beverly 
Robinson, and the mansion built by him and still standing- on 
the shores of the Hudson has ever been an object of interest 
and curiosity, as associated with one of the most important 
episodes in the history of Putnam county. Her sister, Mary 
Philipse, if any reliance can be placed upon the testimony of 
tradition and the description of her contemporaries, must have 
been one of the most beautiful and fascinating women of her 
time, and numbered among her worshiping adorers no less a 
personage than the illustrious Washington. Her heart and hand 
were at length won by Col. Roger Morris, a gentleman of ex- 
cellent family, and who as an aide to the ill-fated Braddock had 
distinguished himself, and was among the wounded in the bat- 
tle of the Monongahela. Previous to their marriage an ante 
nuptial contract was executed, and her extensive landed estate 
was provided for by the following Instrument: 

"This Indenture made the fourteenth day of January in the 
thirty first year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord George the 
Second by the Grace of God of Great Britain Prance and Ire- 
land King Defender of the ffaith, &c. and in the year of our 
Lord one thousand seven hundred and fifty eight, Between 
Mary Philipse of the first part Major Roger Morris of the sec- 
ond part and Johanna Philipse and Beverly Robinson of the 
third part Witnesseth that in consideration of a Marriage in- 
tended to be had and solemnized between the said Roo-er Mor- 
ris and Mary Philipse and the Settlement herein after made by 
the said Roger Morris on the said Mary Philipse, and for and 
in consideration of the sum of live shillings Current Monev of 



88 HISTORY OF PUTXAil COUNTY. 

the Province of New York by the said Johanna Philipse and 
Beverly Robinson to her the said Mary Philipse at or before 
the ensealing and Delivery of these Presents well and Truly 
paid, the Receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, and for di- 
vers other Good Causes and Considerations her thereunto 
moving. She the said Mary P'hilipse Hath Granted Bargained 
Sold Released and Confirmed and by these Presents Doth Grant 
Bargain Sell Release and Confirme unto the said Johanna 
Philipse and Beverly Robinson (in their actual possession now 
being by virtue of a Bargain and Sale to them thereof made for 
one whole Year, by Indenture bearing date the Day next be 
fore the day of the Date of these Presents and by force of the 
Statute for Transferring of uses into possession) and to their 
Heirs All those Severall Lotts or Parcels of Land known by the 
Severall names of Lot Number Three, Number Five, and Num- 
ber Nine, and one third part of the Meadow Land lying in Lot 
Number Two which Lotts Number Three Five Nine and two are 
part of a Certain Tract or Parcel of Land Granted unto Adolph 
Philipse since Deceased by his Late Majesty King William the 
third by his Letters Patent under the Great Seal of the Province 
of New York bearing Date tlie Seventeenth day of June in the 
Year of our Lord one thousand six hundred and ninety seven, 
scituate lying and being in Dutchess County in the high lands 
on the East side of Hudsons River and are Butted and Bounded 
as follows to wit. Lot Number three beginning at two hemlock 
bushes Standing in a Gully between Bull and break neck hills 
on the East side of Hudsons River and from thence running 
North seventy seven Degrees East three hundred and eighty-six 
chains to a heap of stones and walnut bush marked P. R. 1753 
Standing in the West Line of Lot Number four and is also the 
North East Corner of Lot Number two, then North ten degrees 
East two hundred and twenty eight chains to a heap of Stones 
thirty Links North of a White Oak Tree marked P. 1753 being 
the Northwest Corner of Lot Number four, then South eighty 
seven degrees West four hundred and eight chains to the 
Mouth of the Fish kill from thence down the Several Courses 
of Hudsons River to the Beginning including Pollaples Island, 
containing about Eight thousand six hundred Acres. Lot Num- 
ber Five beginning at a heap of stones in the Line of the Man- 
nor of Courtlandt at the South East Corner of Lot Number 
Four, then North ten degrees East nine hundred and forty seven 



GENERAL HIaTOKY. 89 

chains to a heap of Stones at the North East Corner of Lot 
four, then North eighty seven degrees East three hundred and 
forty four chains to a heap of Stones which is the North West 
Corner of Lot Number six, then South ten Degrees West along 
the Line of Lot Number six Nine hundred and sixty Chains to 
a heap of Stones on the Line of the Mannor of Courtlandt at 
the South West Corner of Lot Number six, then AV^est along 
the Line of the Mannor of Courtlandt three hundred and forty 
Chains to the Beginning Containing about thirty one thousand 
two hundred Acres. Lot Number Nine Beginning at a hemlock 
Tree standing on the South side of the East branch of Croton 
Eiver and a heap of Stones on the North side which is also the 
South East Corner of Lot Number six in the Line of the Man- 
nor of Courtlandt from thi?nce running North ten degrees East 
three hundred and thirty three Chains to a heap of Stones and 
a walnut Tree markt P. R. 1753 on the South side of the hill 
near an old meeting house in the Line of Lot Number six, 
being the south west corner of Lot number eight then east 
along the line of Lot Number Eight three hundred and 
thirty-seven Chains to a Chesnut bush markt P. R. 1753 Stand- 
ing in the oblong Line on the West side of a Rocky hill which 
is the South East Corner of L(jt Number eight, 'then Southerly 
as the Oblong line runs three hundred and thirty three Chains 
to the North East Corner of the Mannor of Courtlandt in Peach 
Pond, then West along the said Mannor of Courtlandt three 
hundred and thirty six Chains to the Beginning, Containing 
about Eleven thousand two hundred and twenty Acres and the 
one third part of the Meadow Land lying in Lot Number Two 
Beginning five chains from tlie upland upon Danfords Creek, 
and running to Crooked Creek five Chains from the upland then 
down Crooked Creek to the Meadow belonging to lot number 
one, then North West to Martlers Rook, then along the upland 
the North side of little Island in the Meadow to the Mouth of 
Danfords Creek then up the said Creek to the Beginning Con- 
taining about Eighty two Acres. And also All and Singular the 
Lands Tenements Hereditaments and real Estate whatsoever and 
wheresoever of her the said Mary Philipse. And also all the 
Estate Right Title Interest Possession Claim and Demand what- 
soever of lier the said Mary Philipse of in and to all and Sino-u- 
lar the said Lotts or Parcels of land above mentioned and De- 
S(;ribed and all and Singular her other Lands Tenements Hered- 



90 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

itaments and real Estate whatsoever or any part or parcel 
thereof with the appurtenances To have and to hold all and 
Singular the said several Lots of land herein before mentioned 
or intended to be hereby Released and all and Singular other 
the Lands Tenements Hereditaments and Real Estate whatso- 
ever of her the said Mary Philipse witli their and every of their 
members and appurtenances unto the said Johanna Philipse and 
Beverly Robinson and their Heirs To and for the several uses 
intents and purposes herein after declared expressed, limited, 
and appointed and to and for no other use intent and purpose 
whatsoever, that is to say, to and for the use and behoof of 
them the said Johanna Philipse & Beverly Robinson and their 
Heirs until the solemnization of the said Intended Marriage, 
and from and immediately after the solemnization of the said 
Intended Marriage then to the use and behoof of the said 
Mary Philipse and Roger Morris and the Survivor of them for 
and during the Term of their natural lives without Impeach- 
ment of "Waste, and from and after the determination of that 
Estate then to the use and behoof of such child or children as 
shall or maybe procreated between them, and to his her or their 
Heirs and Assigns forever, but in case the said Roger Morris 
and Mary Philipse shall have no child or children begotten be- 
tween them, or that such child or children shall happen to die 
during the life time of the said Roger and Mary and the said 
Mary should survive the said Roger without issue, then to the 
use & behoof of her the said Mary Philipse and her Heirs and 
Assigns forever, and in case the said Roger Morris should sur- 
vive the said Mary Philipse without any issue by her or that 
such issue is then dead without leaving issue then after the de- 
cease of the said Roger Morris to the only use and behoof of 
such Person or Persons and in such manner and form as she the 
said Mary Philipse shall at any time during the said intended 
Marriage devise the same by her Last Will and Testament for 
that purpose, which last Will and Testament it is hereby agreed 
by all the parties of these Presents that it shall be lawful for 
her at any time during the said Marriage to make publish 
and declare, the said Marriage or any thing herein contained to 
the Contrary thereof in any wise notwithstanding. Provided 
Nevertheless and it is the true intent and meaning of the 
Parties to these Presents that it shall and may be Lawful to 
and for the said Roger Morris and Mary Philipse jointly at any 



GENERAL HISTORY. 91 

time or times during the said Marriage to Sell and Dispose of 
any part of the said Several Lots or Parcels of Land or of any 
other her Lands Tenements Hereditaments and real Estate 
whatsoever to the value of three thousand Pounds Current 
Money of the Province of New York, and in case the said sum 
of three thousand Pounds be not raised by such Sale or Sales 
during their joint Lives and they have issue between them that 
then it shall be Lawful for the survivor of them to raise the said 
Sum by the Sale of any Part of the said Lands or such deficien- 
cy thereof as shall not then have been already raised there- 
out so as to make up the said full sum of three thousand 
pounds anything hereinbefore contained to the contrary there- 
of in any wise notwithstanding. And the said Eoger Morris 
for and in Consideration of the premises and the sum of five 
shillings Current Money of the Province of New York to him 
in hand paid by the said Johanna Philipse and Beverly Robin- 
son Doth hereby for himself his Heirs, Executors and Admin- 
istrators Covenant Promise Grant and agree to and with the 
said Johanna Philipse and Beverly Robinson their and each of 
their Heirs Executors and Administrators in manner and form 
following that is to say, that in case the said Mary Philipse 
shall survive him the said Roger Morris, that then & in such 
case immediately after his Death all & singular the Monies and 
personal Estate whatsoever he shall die possessed shall be ac- 
counted the proper monies and Estate of the said Mary Philipse 
during her ISlatural Life, and after her Decease in case there be 
no issue begotten between the said Roger Morris and Mary 
Philipse then living that then the said Monies and Personal 
Estate shall and may be had and taken by the Executors and 
Administrators of the said Roger Morris these Presents or any 
thing herein Contained to the Contrary thereof in anywise not- 
withstanding, but if such Child or Children shall survive the 
said Roger Morris and Mary Philipse then the said monies and 
estate to be divided among them in such Shares and Propor- 
tions as he the said Roger Morris shall think fit at any time 
hereafter by his Last Will and Testament or otherwise to order 
and direct. 

" In witness whereof all the parties first above named 
have to these Parts hereof all of the same Tenor 
and Date set their Hands and Seals the Date 
and Year first above written. 



92 history of put>fam county. 

" Mary Philipse. (L. S.) 

" Roger Morris. (L. S.) 

" Johanna Philipse. (L. S.) 

" Bev. Robinson. (L. S.)" 

Recorded in Secretary of State's office, Albany, Liber 20, 
p. 550. 

Five days after the execution of this instrument, on the 19th 
of January, 1758, Col. Morris and Mary Philipse were married 
in the old Manor House at Yonkers, with all the pomp and 
splendor that was worthy of their station and suited 
to their circumstances. The greater portion of their time was 
passed in the city of New York, and the place where they 
lived is well known in modern times as the famous Jumel man- 
sion, within whose walls have congregated alike the noted men 
of the early days of the republic and the distinguished char- 
acters of more recent times. At the time of the commencement 
of the Revolution, Col. Morris was a member of Council for the 
colony, and continued in office till the close of the war and the 
declaration of peace put a final end to British rule and estab- 
lished a new nation. As a more extended sketch of Col. Robin- 
son and Col. Morris will be found in another place, it is suffic- 
ient to state that both were among the most prominent of the 
royalists, who throughout the war, supported the efforts of the 
British government to crush the liberties of their native land. 
Under these circumstances it can not be surprising, that when 
the final triumph came, the State should deem unworthy of its 
protection the persons and the property of those who had ad- 
hered to the cause of the enemies of its freedom. 

It was in accordance with this view that an act of attainder 
was passed confiscating the property of the most prominent of 
the royalists, and banishing them from the State: 

"An act for the forfeiture and sale of the estates of persons who 
have adhered to the enemies of this State, etc., passed Oc- 
tober 22d, 1779: 
"Whereas, during the present unjust and cruel war waged 
by the King of Great Britain against the State and the other 
United States of America, divers persons holding or claiming 
property witliin this State, have voluntarily been adherent to 
the said King, his fieets and armies, enemies to this State, and 
the said other United States, with intent to subvert the govern- 



GENERAL HISTORY. 93 

rnent and liberties of this State and the said other United States 
and to bring the same in subjection to the Crown of Great 
Britain; by reason whereof, the said persons having severally 
justly forfeited all right to the protection of this State, and to 
the benefit of the laws under which such property is held or 
claimed: And whereas the public justice and safety of this 
State absolutely require, that the most notorious offenders 
should be immediately hereby convicted and attainted of the 
offence aforesaid in order to work a forfeiture of their respec- 
tive estates and vest the same in the people of this State. 

"And whereas the Constitution of this State hath authorized 
the Legislature to pass acts of attainder for crimes committed 
before the termination of the present war. 

" Section 1. Be it therefore enacted by the People of the State 
of New York, represented in Senate and Assembly, and it is 
hereby enacted by the authority of the same, that William 
Try on, Esq., late Governor of the said Colonj^, * * Roger 
Morris, * * Mary Morris, wife of said Roger Morris, * * 
Beverley Robinson, * * Susannah" Robinson, wife of said 
Beverley Robinson, be, and each of them are hereby severally 
declared to be y^.s'o facto convicted and attainted of the offense 
aforesaid, and that all and singular the estate, both real and 
personal, held or claimed by them the said persons severally 
and respectively, whether in possession, reversion or remainder, 
within this State, on the date of the passage of the act, shall 
be, and hereby is declared to be forfeited to, and vested in, the 
people of this State." 

By the provisions of this act John Hathorn, Samuel Dodge 
and Daniel Graham were appointed commissioners to sell con- 
fiscated and forfeited estates. Under the power given to them 
by this act, they proceeded to the sale. In a large number of 
cases, in fact a majority, the lands were sold to the parties who 
were already in possession of the various farms, as tenants of 
Beverly Robinson and Roger Morris, by the right of their 
respective wives. On the 12th day of May, 1781, another act 
was passed "for the speedy sale of confiscated and forfeited 
estates and for other purposes." By this act, Daniel Graham, 
one of the former commissioners, was appointed a sole commis- 
sioner for sales in the middle district. He employed Henry 
Dodge, Esq., of Poughkeepsie, as surveyor to assist in the 
work, who stated at a later date that "he was a loni? time em- 



94 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

ployed and formed a field book of at least a quire of paper, 
completely filled with descriptions of the parcels disposed of by 
Mr. Graham." 

This field book and every trace of the proceedings of Mr. 
Graham as sole commissioner were lost and have never been 
found. 

The Legislature, in 1819, passed a concurrent resolution: " Re- 
solved that the Surveyor General cause to be surveyed and as- 
certained the lands forfeited to the people of this State by the 
attainder of Robert Morris and Mary his wife situated in the 
former County of Dutchess and now in the Counties of Dutch- 
ess and Putnam, claimed by John Jacob Astor and others, and 
that he also ascertain whether any and which of the said lands 
so forfeited and claimed remains unsold by or under the author, 
ity of this State, and that he report thereon to the Legislature 
at their next Session." 

In accordance with this the surveyor general appointed Henry 
Livingston his agent to obtain the requisite information. He 
engaged as surveyors Mr. James Dodge, of Poughkeepsie, and 
Mr. Samuel Thurston, of Clinton, and they with six assistants 
met on Lot No. 3, on the 2d of August, 1819, and finished their 
surveys on the 16th. The report which he made to the surveyor 
general conveys a very extended information on the subject, and 
states, '• I caused the exterior limits of Lots 3-5-9 with every 
open highway and all the ponds to be carefully surveyed and 
the maps designated every house and the name of its occupant." 
The sales made by the three commissioners first named were en- 
tered in a book in abstract. The abstract gives the name of the 
purchaser, the price paid, the date, the name of the person by 
whose attainder it became forfeited, and a full description of 
the land by the courses and distances of survey. This book is 
Liber 8, of the Record of Deeds, in the office of the clerk of 
Dutchess county. The first page, which is mutilated by having 
about one-third torn off, contains a formal deed to one David 
Collins. On the last page of the book is the following: 

" Tlie foregoing is a true abstract of the sales of forfeited 
estates made by us the subscribers Commissionei's of Forfeiture 
for the Middle District, in the County of Dutchess, in the State 
of New York, pursuant to the directions of sundry laws, of 
the said State in that case made and provided." 



GEXEKAL HISTORY. 95 

"New York 30th August 1788. 

" JoH^ Hathorn, I Commissioners of 
" Saml, Dodgk, a Forfeiture for the 
" Danl. Geahaji, ) Middle District.'" 

The following list is taken from the report of Henry Living- 
ston to the surveyor general. It seems that formal deeds were 
given to the various purchasers, many of which have been put 
on record in the offices of the clerks of both Putnam and Dutch- 
ess counties, and abstracts alone were entered as stated, in Liber 
8 of Deeds. 

" Sales of land in Lot No. 5, of Philipse Patent, belonging to 
Roger Morris and his wife Mary: — Wm. Smith land near Red 
Mills, 3^ acres; Wm. Smith The Red Mills including the large 
Island, 188, 172, 71, 314; John Drake, 262; Abraham Hyatt, 70; 
Joseph Gregory, 279; John Crane, 1G4; John Berry, 50; Joshua 
Horton, 262; Jehiel Bouton, 189; Isaac Pierce, 126; James 
Cock (small island), 6; Josiah Faulkner, 43; John Avery, 159; 
John De Clare, 89; Charles F. Weisenfels, 137; John Berry and 
John McLean, 141; John Oakley, 111; Joseph and Daniel Cole, 
230; John Dearman, 72; David Smith, 318; Nathaniel Nott, 98 
Ebenezer Cole, 36; Isaac Requa, 130; Isaac Lounsberry, 202 
Jonathan Stokum, 97; Charles Agor, 94; Isaac Rhodes, 221 
Hannah Brewer, 89; Tliomas Bryant, 129; Isaac Rhodes, 221 
Hannah Brewer, 89; Elisha Cole, 117, 396; Isaac Barrett, 121 
Isaac Austin, 92; Nathan Lane, 278; John Smith, 70; John 
O'Brien, 210; Ebenezer Boyd, 71, 98, 8, 157; David Frost, 168; 
John Booth, 128; Thomas Horton, 160; Abraham Mabie, 187; 
Joseph Farrington, 141; Josiah Farrington, 310; Justus Berrit, 
130; Joseph Ogden, 34; John Russell, 39; Samuel Hunt, 117- 
James Townsend, 352; Wm. Haddon, 138; Jeremiah Sprague, 
98; Amy Haight, 96; Ebenezer Boyd, 461, 110, 220, 400; Isaac 
Rhodes, 32; Peter Badeau, 217; Jabez Berry, 188; Peter Mabie, 
105; Peter Mabie, 68; Peleg and Shubael Wixom, 193; Israel 
Pinckney, 144; Comfort Chadwick, 68; Abner Doty, 90; James 
Cock, 131; Wm. Hitchcock, 178; Peter Banker, 149; JohnGean, 
194; John Crane and others, 360; Charles Serrine, 198; Joseph 
Gregory, 130; John Merritt, 94; Tho. & Zebedee Kirkland, 336; 
Jam.-s Seriine, HI; Charles Heroy, 112; John Adams, 90; 
Robert Hughson. 363; Daniel Knapp, 162; Robert Russell, 62; 
John Secor, 124; Isaac Secor, 124; Moses Knapp, 230; Timothy 
Carver, 355; Abigail Clark, 132; Ebenezer Lockwood, 144; Isaac 



96 HISTORY Oh- PUTNAM COUNTY. 

Badeau, 94; John Requa, 132; Isaac Hopkins, 13; Israel Knapp, 
120; Solomon Hopkins, 841; Benj. Knapp, 127; Wm. Hitch- 
cock, 26; Solomon Hopkins, 220, 82; Samuel Ballard, 54; Wm. 
Ballard, 93; Isaac Drew, 187; Comfort Chadwick, 117; James 
Smalley, 232; Moses Mead, 256; Samuel Hawkins, 100; John 
Post, 81; Johnston Deakin, 230; Joseph Farrington, 160; 
Robert Fuller, ; Peter Anderson, 250; John Beyea, 132; 

Thomas Russell, 166; Wm. Goodfellow, 66; John Russell, 39; 
Samuel Merger, 211; Jesse Hunt, 163; Wm. Falconer (island), 1. 

"Sales in Lot. No. 9: Ebenezer Philipse, 162; Ezra Gregory, 
106; Jonathan Brown, 351; Jonathan Crane, 125; Edmond 
Mead, 218; Charles Graham, 316; Philip Leek, 129; Moody 
Howes, 259; James Sackett, 138; Isaac Townsend, 156; Seth 
Paddock, 293; Nathan Green, 269; Thomas Lowrie, 119; Silas 
Paddock, 174; John Gove, 237; Timothy Delavan, 106; Benj 
and Enoch Crosby, 276, 103; Stephen Field, 405; Maurice Smith, 
206; Nathaniel Delavan, 228; Ezra Richards, 187; Jacob Ellis 
146; Peleg Bailey, 123; Wm. Yeomans, 122; John Crab, 143 
Joseph Haskins, 174; John Gannnng, 178; Gilbert Haight, 48 
Wm. Field, 100; Billy Trowbridge, 287; Samuel Delevan, 112 
James Dunn, 80; Abel Van Scoy, 120; Jacob Van Scoy, 88 
John Davis, 116; Sylvanus Covert, 49; Gilbert Haight, 64 
Mahar Nelson, 132; Wm. Higby, 128; Henry Charlick, 383 
Ichabod Marvin, 74; Thomas Adams, 270; Thomas Russells, 166 
Richard Williams, 109; Joseph Randall, 221; Samuel Carle 
270; Frederick Pickney, 29; Wm. Lovelace, 107; Moses Rich 
ards, 177; Mary Haines, 301; John Piatt, 100; Edmond Rice, 
284; David Paddock, 304; Hannah Nickerson, 229; Nehemiah 
Wood, 147; John Field, 854; Uriah Wallace, 69; Jeremiah 
Mead, 111; David Cowen, 92; John Townsend, 100; John Dan, 
99; Isaac Paddock, 153; Moses Gage, 97; John Dickinson and 
David Bull, 17; John Dickinson, 210; Heman King, 284; Michael 
Piatt, 167; Solomon Field, 267; Caleb Palmer, 75; Consider 
Carman, 180; Samuel Hawkins, 27; Richard Ayres, 200; Robert 
Shaw, 190; Abel Van Scoy, 76; Samuel Jones, 194; David Por- 
ter, 190; Jacob Kniffen, 260; Zacheus Newcomb, 165; Henry 
Charlick, 171; Daniel Hunt, 8; Ichabod Marvin, 100. 

" Sales made in Lot 3 of Roger Morris: Jonathan Pine, 240; 
Maurice Smith, 142; John Haight, 256; Wm. Wright, 125; Cor- 
nelius Adriance, 21f ; Joseph Huestis, 296; Benjamin Bloomer, 
460f ; Gilbert Bloomer, 298|; John Barton, lOSi; Charity Hues- 



GENERAL HISTORY. 97 

tis, 219; Peter Dubois, 293^-; Martin Willsie, 4 parcels, 528*: 
John Van Amburg, 346|; Judith Crownell, 153; Gilbert Weeks, 
285; Israel Knapp, 168; Isaac Springer, 50; Philip Pelton, 49; 
Jonathan Miller, 106; Titus Travis, 118; Jedediah Frost, 143; 
Richard Cliristian, 331; John Budd, 200; James Langdon, 82; 
David Hanion, 200; Paul Sparling. 54; Gilbert Bloomer, 187; 
Nathaniel Anderson, 266; Daniel Ter Bos, three parcels, 1497; 
Benj. Bloomer, 430; John Haight and John Nelson, 371A; Israel 
Knapp, 354; Cornelius Adriance, 27; Squire Baker, 30; Andrew 
Hill, 385; Paul Sparling, 54. Total No. of acres sold in Lots 
3-5-9, 39100." 

Previous to the Revolution, Roger Morris and his wife sold 
to Ebenezer Boyd and William Hill, GOO acres in Loi No. 5. 
The marsh or meadow between Constitution Island and Lot 2 
was divided as stated before, and the north part fell to Mary 
Morris. From this share the commissioners sold parcels to 
Martin Wilsie, Solomon Cornell, Charity Huestis, Matthew 
Snook and Justus Nelson, amounting to 55^ acres. Mr. Livings- 
ton reported as follows: 

"Population of Lot No. 3, seventy-five houses containing 

as many families, reckoning six to a family, . . 450 

"On Lot 5 three hundred and twenty families, reckoning 

six to a family, 1,920 

"On Lot 9 one hundred and twenty-nine families, reckon- 
ing six to a family, 774 

"Total, 3,144 

"From my own observation and that of others I deem that 
4.600 acres are under cultivation in Lot No. 3. 

" On Lot No. 5 14,939 acres under cultivation. 

"On Lot No. 9 7,348 acres inclosed and improved. 

"Total acres improved 26,887." 

"Uncultivated and unimproved 23,962, in all 50,849 acres. 

"The assessors of the towns of Kent and Carmeh furnished 
their returns, of such part of their respective towns as were 
embraced in Lots 5 and 9: 

"The valuation of real estate, in that part of Lot 5 

which lies in the town of Kent is, . . 881,981.00 

" In the town of Carmel, 234.230.00 

"Total Assessors valuation of Lot 5, . 316,211. (.'0 



8 HISTORY OF PUTNAJr COUJfTY. 

'Assessors valuation of real estate on Lot 9, in 

town of South East, 250,394.00 

•I could not procure the assessors returns of Lot 
No. 3 in Philip and' Fishkill Towns but from 
good information state it, ... . 81,022.00 



Total of Lots 3-5-9, 8647,627.00." 

Mr. Livingston adds the following observations which are 
interesting as showing the conditions of this part of the county 
eighty years ago: 

"Lot No. 3, contains 9,200 acres, of these 2,000 are feasible 
and well improved. Hardly equal however to some parts of 
Lot 5 which lie in Carmel and various parcels on Lot No. 9. 
Three thousand more may be equal to the better parts of Lot 
No. 5 lying in Kent and the middling qualities of the same Lot 
in Carmel. The residue of this Lot is mountainous some alto- 
gether inaccessible, the buildings are erected upon a humble 
scale, all wood. Perhaps one- third of the field enclosures are 
stone. It is perfectly well watered by springs and rivulets. The 
farmers all reside at inconsiderable distances from either Fish- 
kill or Cold Springs landings. This adds value to their several 
estates." 

"Lot No. 5. 

"The northern part of this Lot and that which lies in the 
town of Kent is mountainous and Rocky. Some of the valleys 
are excellent meadows and where the soil can be come at 
is good. But these estimable portions bear but a small propor- 
tion to the more rugged parts. The Southern division of this 
tract and which is the town of Carmel is hilly but cannot be 
deemed mountainous. Here extensive and excellent meadows 
every where meet the eye, and tillage is well attended to. The 
soil how^ever is generally stony, very little wheat is grown on 
this Lot. Rye forms the bread of a very large majority. Their 
exports are rye Indian corn buckwheat beef pork butter and 
cheese. The whole of this Lot is well watered by ponds and 
small streams. Mahopac is a beautiful pond, has several islands 
and contains 659 acres of water. This and nine other ponds 
embelish this County. These waters all abound in fish. The 
northern section of this Lot can pass to the Cold Spring landing 
on an excellent turnpike road, but the middle and southern di- 
visions choose the port of Peekskill. The buildings on this Lot 



GENERAL HISTORY. 99 

are generally below mediocrity. Many however are comfort- 
able. The day for elegance has not arriced.''' 

"Lot No. 9. 

" Is so very like the south part of Lot 5 that a description 
of the one is a portrait of the other. This tract is not 
really mountainous but yet is yevj near it. The soil is good but 
stony. Croton river enters near its northwest and leaves at its 
Southeast angle. Ponds also beautify this tract and small 
streams abound. More than half the field enclosures in this 
Lot as well as Lot 5 are composed of stone. A turnpike road 
passes through this Lot from the north east to the south east 
corner, ending at Sing Sing." 

Sales by the Commissioners of Forfeitures of the Lands of 
Beverly Robinson and wife. Sales in Lot No. 4: — Squire Baker, 
116 acres; Joshua Tompkins, 112; Nathaniel Jagger, 87; Titus 
Travis, 118; John Eussell, 101; Josiah Ingersoll, 30; John Clin- 
ton, 110; Wm. White, 179^; Philip Pelton and Joshua Myrick, 
500, 600, 178; Gilbert Oakley, 130; Richard Denny, 114|; Na- 
thaniel Tompkins, 219; John Hyatt and Isaac Penier, 232; Rich- 
ard Slatterly, 120^; John Likely, 96|; Wm. Colegrove, 187; 
John Hyatt, 316; Comfort Luddington, 15; Elijah Oakley, 264; 
Caleb Frisbee, 99; John Denny, 106; Cornelius Tompkins, 240; 
Daniel Bugbee, 220; Anthony Field, 500; Richard Denny, 80i; 
Samuel Cromwell, 239; Titus Travis, 127^; Jonathan Miller, 106i; 
Jedediah Frost, 143; Gabriel Acker, 172; Philip Steinback, 122i; 
Peter Rickey. 287; Thomas Hill, 370; Ricliard Christian, 331^; 
Wm. Crawford, 281; Reuben Tompkins, 217^; Daniel Delavan, 
370; Hyatt Lane, 203; Richard Denny, 129^; John Hyatt and 
Isaac Penier, 461^ 480^; John Budd, 200; James Langdou, 82; 
Wm. Smith, 188; Natlian Lane, 278; Ebenezer Boyd, 192; Sam- 
uel Drake, 51, 74; Joseph Paine, 117; John Hoyt, 154; Robert 
Oakley, 22U; Gilbert Lockwood, 137; Jesse Owen, 188; Zeph- 
aniah Piatt and John Bailey, 495, 500; Jacobus Swarthout, 110; 
Mary Conklin, 370; Comfort Luddington, 15; Caleb Frisbee, 99; 
Henry Kiers, 147; John Brinkerhoff, 250; James Sherwood, 160; 
Isaac Si)ringer, 50; Jonathan Price, 240; Thomas Lewis, 207; 
John Yeomans, 134; John Christian, 259; John Shouck, 280; 
John Weeks, 425; Thomas Bashford, 158; Moses Duseubury, 
105; Nathaniel Jagger, 123; Sibert Cronk, 240; Joshua Tomp- 
kins, 185, 111, 37; John Campbell, 439; Abraham Baker. 43S; 
Gilbert Budd, 85; Widow Hester Tan Tassel, 123; Oliver Odell. 



100 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

172; Matthew McCabe, 193; Daniel Willsie, 130; Ezekiel Gee, 
200; Samuel Drake, 500; Joshua Drake, 500; Solomon Hopkin?, 
250; John Horton, 140i; James Jacocks, 162; Jonathan Owens, 
272^, 312^; Amos Odell, 46^; Henry Post and Isaac Odell, 227*; 
Thomas Smith and Jacob Reed, 134^; Joseph Bard, 184; Wm. 
Oakley, 129; John Hyatt and George Lane, 465; Jacobus Swart- 
hout, 464; Jacob Griffin, 397; Richard Christian, Jr., 152f; 
John McDonald, 112i; George Lowe, 239; Wm. Dusenburry, 
305|; Peter Barager, 213; James Perry, 150; John Smith, 165; 
John Hyatt and Nathaniel Hyatt, 457; Joshua Hyatt, 457; Solo- 
mon Smith, 163; Hannah Knapp, 222^; Abraham Post, 252; 
Moses Dusenburry, 11 5J; John Drake, 271; Jesse Owens, 82; 
Moses Dusenburry, 217^. 

Sales in Lot No. 7: Elija Oakley, 264 acres; David Hill, 160; 
Joseph Crawford, S5i; Alexander Kidd, 111; David Close, 159; 
James Hays, 252: Ephraim Warren, 128; John Newbury, 125; 
David Hecocks, 293; Roswell Wilcox, 161; John Burck, 130; 
Peter Coiley, 17; Increase Bennett, 4; Anthony Post, 98; Na- 
thaniel Delavan, 465; Caleb Frisbee, 115; Robert Morris, 300; 
Wm. Duer, 208; John Newbury, 60; Anthony Post, 28 poles; 
John Burch, 40 acres; Abraham St. John, 200; Jonathan Burck, 
112; James Calkins, 4Si; Robert Mooney, 146; Benjamin Bird- 
sail, 30i; JohnHealy, 208; James Fairley, 119; Matthew Pat- 
terson, 157; Abraham St. John, 59; Comfort Sands, 187; Nehe- 
miah Stebbins, 329; Benjamin Birdsall, 173; Henry Luddington, 
Samuel Mills, Billy Trowbridge, Benaijah Beardsley, 338 and 
126; Uriah Wallace, SO; Samuel T. Pell, 300; Comfort Ludding- 
ton, 200; James Philips, 113; Jehiel Weed, 170; Daniel Shaw, 
If; Samuel Towner, 269; Jedediah Wyllys, 105; Thomas Mit- 
chell, 122; Asa Howes, 271; Jedediah Wyllys, 200; Robert 
Morris, 194; James Corey, 85i; David Hecocks, 120; Ephraim 
Jones, 119; Comfort Sands, 456; Ezra Gregory, 166; James 
Rosekrans, 118; xVnthony Post, Matthew Patterson, Alexander 
Kidd, 199; Wm. B. Alger, 250, 70. 

Lot 8. 

In tliis lot there was sold to Philip Pelton, Benjamin Pelton 
and Daniel Pelton. 159 acres, being in two parcels. This was 
land formerly sold by John Ogilvie and Margaret Ogilvie to 
Edward Price, and afterward owned by Tertullus Dickerson, 
bv whose conviction it was forfeited. This tract or a part of it 



GENERAL HISTORY. 101 

now belongs to Theodore Kelly. The old '-Buvcham Mills" 
stood on this tract before the Revolution. 

Sales in Lot No. 1: The greater part of this lot was sold to 
William Denning, a wealthy merchant of New York. The 
whole of the western part of the lot was sold to him by Daniel 
Graham, the surveyor general of the State, as commissioner of 
. forfeitures. A tract adjoining this on the east and running the 
whole length of the lot was also sold to William Denning by 
Daniel Graham, May 3d, 1785. These two deeds include all the 
lot except a comparatively small tract in the southeast corner. 
Of this a tract of about 439 acres was sold to Major John Camp- 
bell. The parsonage farm of St. Peters Church and St. Philips 
Chapel embraced about 200 acres, and lay next east of Major 
CampbelUs, and was given to the church by the State, while near 
the southeast corner was a larger tract sold to John Meeks. 
Jonathan Owen also had a tract of about 580 acres, which lay 
at the extreme southeast corner of Lot No. 1. 

Sales in the Oblong: By the attainder of Henry Clinton, 
several parcels of land were sold in the Oblong. The following 
is a partial list: Isaac Elwell, 41 acres; Benjamin Sears, 48, 82; 
Joseph Crane, Jr., 25; Mark Gage, 75; Elihu Gage, 53, 71; An- 
thony Gage, 112; Nathaniel Sinclair, 4; Thomas Higgins, 95i; 
John Elwell, 15; Joseph Drake, 3; John Starr, 83^; Wm.. Clin- 
ton, 29, 46; Benjamin Sears, 25. 

The Oblong was not a part of the Philij^se Patent. Its history 
will be found in a succeeding chapter. 



CHAPTER VII. 



THE Gore was a tract of land to the north of the Philipse 
Patent and was for many years a source of dispute and 
litigation between the Philipse family and the owners of the 
Rumbont and Beekman Patents, which adjoined them on the 
north. The vague and indefinite manner in which the bounds 
of early land grants were described almost invariably led to 
disputes of this nature. In this case 'the dispute arose, not 
from uncertainty as to the bounds of the Philipse Patent, but 
from the peculiar manner in which the south lines of the Rum- 
bout and Beekman Patents were described. The south bounds 
of the Rumbout Patent are thus defined: " Also from the said 
Fish kill or creek called Mateawam, along the said Fish kill 
into the woods at the foot of the High Hills, including all the 
reed or low lands at the south side of said creek, with an easterly 
line four hours going, sixteen English miles." 

The Beekman Patent was described as '-Beginning at the 
north side of the Highlands, at the east of the lands of Col. 
Van Cortlandt and Company (that is the Rumbout Patent) so 
far as the line between the Province of New York and the Colony 
of Connecticut extends." 

The bounds of the Philipse Patent were described as beginning 
at Anthony's Nose, which was the southwest corner of the 
patent, and running north along the Hudson River "until it 
comes to the Creek River or Run of water called the Great Fish 
kill to the northward and above the Highlands which is like- 
wise the southward bounds of a tract of land belonging to Col. 
Stephanns Cortlandt and Company and so easterly along Col. 
Cortlandt's line and the south bounds of Col. Henry Beekman 
until it comes twenty miles or unto the Division Line between 
our Colony of Connecticut &c." 



GENERAL HISTORY. 103 

The Philipse family claimed that by the terras of the Eam- 
bout Patent the Fishkill Creek was its south boundary and, as 
the Philipse Patent was bounded on the north by that patent, 
it followed that the Fishkill was their northern boundary. 
Again as the Beekman Patent was said to be "on the north side 
of the Highlands" and they were bounded north by the Beek- 
man Patent, it followed that they owned all the land south of 
the north line of the mountains. On the other hand the pro- 
prietors of both the Rumbout and Beekman Patents claimed 
that the north line of the Philipse Patent was a due east line 
from the mouth of the Fishkill and that their southern bound- 
aries extended to it. 

)Among the Philipse papers is a brief, written by David Og- 
den, the counsel for that family, which states in a few words 
their line of argument. " There is no dispute as to the point 
of beginning, on the Southside of the Fishkill. "As the Rum- 
bout Patent was all that tract on the north side of the High-' 
lands, no part of the Highlands was included in it." "The 
words along the Fishkill intended it to be the boundary, as much 
as along the river." "That as the Wappingers kill with the 
addition of 500 rods, was the north boundary of the Rumbout 
Patent, so the Fishkill, with the reed or low lands, was the 
south boundary." "The words easterly line mean the same 
with reference to the Fishkill that northerly does to Hudson 
River, and that the four hours going should be measured along 
the Fishkill, and that a straight line measured along the Fish- 
kill or so as not to go on any of the hills, will by the maj) differ 
but little." " That a line running east from the mouth of the 
Fishkill instead of being on the north of the Highlands, in 
less than a mile runs into them and continues therein the whole 
16 miles." 

He concludes that the Fishkill is the true north boundary of 
the Philipse Patent except where there are " reed or lowlands," 
and all such belong to the Rumbout Patent. After a long con- 
troversy the dispute was settled January 26th, 1771. At that 
time the contest was between Lawrence Lawrence, who owned 
one-third of the share of Jacobus Kip in the Rumbout Patent, 
and the heirs of Frederick Philipse. The matter was left to the 
decision of William Nicoll and Thomas Hicks. They decided 
that "a line should begin at the northern extent of the bushes 
or shrubs upon Plum Point: being the south side of the mouth 



104 HISTORY OF PUTNAJI COUNTY. 

of the Fishkill, and should run from thence East 6 degrees 
North, as the Compass now points, 16 miles, and that the said 
line shall forever hereafter be and remain the boundary." At 
the Revolution this triangular tract was owned by Beverly 
Robinson, Roger Morris and Philip Philipse. The shares of 
the first two were confiscated and by a law passed in 1784 the 
tract was divided into three lots, of which the State of New 
York had two and the heirs of Philip Philipse had one. The 
lot of the Philipse family lay next to the east line of the Rum- 
bout Patent and was 115 chains wide at the east end, the course 
of the east line being north 25 degrees 30 minutes west. This 
lot is the southeast corner of the town of East Fishkill. From 
the Philipse papers it is found that the cost of their claim to 
this Gore was £1,818, 12s. 

GORE IN BEEKMAN PATENT. 

• It has been seen that the owners of the Philipse Patent 
claimed that the Beekraan Patent lay to the north of the High- 
lands, and consequently covered no portion of the mountains, 
while the Beekmans with equal pertinacity claimed that their 
south boundary should be a line running due east from the 
south side of the mouth of Fishkill. The controversy lasted 
for many years and finally was settled, like that concerning the 
Rumbout Gore, by a compromise. On the ISth of January,1758, 
Beverly Robinson, Susannah Robinson, Philip Philipse and 
Mary Philipse on the one part, and Henry Beekman, Catharine 
Pawling and Robert Livingston on the other part, mutually 
agreed, "for the ending of all disputes," that a line should be 
run "from Mateawam or the mouth of Fishkill as the Compass 
now points due east to the Oblong." From this point on the Ob- 
long a line was to be run northerly along the Oblong line, 200 
chains, and from thence "a due west line as the Compass now 
points," to the rear of the Rumbout Patent, and this last line 
should be the boundary between the parties. Samuel Willis, 
of Hempstead, Long Island, was emj)loyed as the surveyor, 
and the north line is thus described: — " Began on the Oblong 
line at a large heap of stones set up which bears N. 25 degrees 
west, 38 links from a large rock on which are cut the letters H. 
B. B. R. P. P.; a new house erected by Daniel Chase bears the 
same course the rock does. From thence due west, the line 
runs about 12 feet south of Wm. Hunt's spring or fountain, 



GENERAL HISTORY. 105 

where Col. Henry Beekraan made the letters H. B., on the rock 
out of which the water of the spring runs. Said line also crosses 
a pretty large pond in the mountains, a little south of the mid- 
dle. On the east shore a monument is set up about 2 chains 
south of one Baker's house standing in a hollow." 

The rock mentioned as marked with the letters H. B. B. R. 
P. P., is still to be seen and is one of the most interesting land- 
marks in this portion of the country. It is in the town of 
Pawlings, on the homestead of Martin Leach, and is 78 feet 
north of the barn, and 20 feet south of the wall on the south 
side of the orchard (which wall is the original north line of the 
Gore) and about 35 feet west of a wall running north from the 
east end of the barn. Some 20 rods east of this is a piece of 
low marshy ground and a small stream running to the soutli. 
A large rock and an old white oak tree stand on the west 
side of the marsh. The "new house erected by Daniel Chase" 
is where the house of Martin Leach now stands, about 20 rods 
south of the rock. The rock is 95 paces east from the road 
which runs north and south. As this farm includes land on 
both sides of the Oblong, the line itself has been obliterated by 
the removal of the fences, but the original line was two or three 
feet west of the rock. The letters P. P. are plainly visible, on 
the south side of the rock, which slopes downward, and the letters 
H. B. are on the north end, which is nearly perpendicular, near 
the top. The letters B. R. have disappeared and they were 
probably on a portion of the rock which has scaled off. From 
this rock the " Mizzen Top " Hotel bears a little south of east. 
The farm and homestead were sold by Daniel Chase to Jona- 
than Aikin; lie left it to his son Peter, who in turn left it to his 
son Isaac; he left it to his nephew, Jonathan Aikin, who sold 
it to Martin Leach, the present owner, about 1870. 

It is a cnrious illustration of how easily old landmarks are 
forgotten that neither the present owner nor his predecessor liad 
any knowledge as to the significance of this marked monument. 
The line running to the west crosses the Harlem Railroad about 
100 rods south of Pawlings Station. The " pretty large pond 
in the mountains," is now known as Whaley Pond. The ag-ree- 
ment above mentioned is recorded in the records of Dutchess 
county, in Liber C, page 190. The Gore thus obtained was 
surveyed into farms by Jonathan Hamjiton and leased and sold 
to various parties. Farm 15, containing 249 acres, was sold to 



106 HISTORY OF PCTNAH COU^-TY. 

Reed Ferris, February 5th, 1772. It was then in possession of 
Isaiah and Joseph Burch. By agreement Reed Ferris was to 
bear the expense of any law suits he might have to sustain title. 
Farm 19 was sold to Stephen Wilcox, and was then in posses- 
sion of John Munroe and Amos Wilcox. Among the purchas- 
ers was John Kane, who married Lucy, daughter of Rev. Elisha 
Kent, and was the ancestor of the illustrious explorer. Dr. 
Elisha Kent Kane. The homestead of John Kane is south of 
Pawlings and was formerly known as the "Slocum place," and 
was in 1877 the residence of William H. Chapman, Esq. Mr. 
Kane kept a store there previous to the Revolution. 

The following is an abstract of the deed to Reed Ferris. The 
original is written on a large sheet of parchment and is still in 
possession of his descendants. The residence of Mr. Ferris is 
still standing. 

"This indenture made the fifth day of February in the 
twelfth year of the Reign of our Sovereign Lord George the 
third by the Grace of God of Great Britain France and Ireland 
King Defender of the Faith &c. Annoque Domini one thousand 
seven hundred and seventy two Between the Honourable Roger 
Morris Esq. and Mary his Wife Beverly Robinson and Susan- 
nah his Wife the Reverend John Ogilvie and Margaret his 
Wife, Nathaniel Marston and Adolph Philipse of the first Part, 
Reed Ferris of Dutchess County Yeoman of the second Part 
Witnesseth that the said parties of the first part for and in 
Consideration of the sum of Eight hundred pounds Current 
Money of the Province of New York to them the said parties 
of the first Part in hand paid by the said Reed Ferris at or be- 
fore the Ensealing and Delivery of the Presents the Receipt 
whereof they do hereby acknowledge and thereof do acquit re- 
lease and Discharge Reed Ferris his Heirs Executors and Ad- 
ministrators and every of them by these presents have granted 
bargained and sold aliened remised released and by these Pres- 
ents Do fully freely and absolutely grant bargain and sell alien 
remise release and confirm unto the said Reed Ferris in his ac- 
tual possession now being by virtue of a bargain and Sale to him 
* -^ * and his Heirs and Assigns forever all these several 
Tracts of Land Farms or Plantations situate lying or being in 
Dutchess County being part of the undivided part of Philipse's 
upper patent in Pawlings Precinct called butted and bounded 
as follows to witt Farm Number Fifteen now in possession of 



GEI^ERAL HISTORY. 107 

Isaiah and Joseph Burch beginnino; at a stake in the line of 
Beverly Robinsons Lot Number Seven being the South East 
Corner of farm number Seventeen from thence North forty-four 
Chains forty Links to farm Number Nineteen then East Ninety- 
five Chains Eighty Links to the Corner of farm Number Nine- 
teen then North three Chains fifty Links to the South west Cor- 
ner of Farm Number Ten then East thirty-three Chains ninety 
Links to Farm Number Eleven then South Forty- three Chains 
fifty links to the Line of the said Robinson's Number seven 
then south Eighty-seven Degrees West fifty-nine Chains thirty 
Links along said Robinson's Line to the beginning containing 
two hundred and forty-nine Acres more or less as may appear 
by a Map and return Book made by Jonathan Hampton may 
appear, and also all that farm or plantation called farm Number 
Nineteen in possession of John Munroe and Amos Wilcox 
butted and bounded as follows to wit beginning at a Stake on 
Colonel Beekman's or * * * line which is the North West 
corner of Farm Number Ten from thence South sixty-seven 
Chains then West forty-four Chains Eighty Links to the South 
East Corner of Farm Number sixteen then North thirty-seven 
Chains to Farm Number thirteen then East twenty Chains to 
the Corner of said Farm Number thirteen then North thirty 
Chains to Beekman's line then East twenty-four Chains Eighty 
Links to the Beginning containing two Hundred and forty acres 
more or less as by a Map and return Book of Jonathan Hamp- 
ton may appear together with all and singular the woods etc. 

" Roger Morris, 
" Mart Morris, 
" John Ogilvie, 
" Margaret Ogilvie, 
" Bev. Robinsox, 
" Susannah Robinson. 
" Nathal. Marston, 
'• Adolph Piiilipse." 

This Gore, like the other, was divided after the Revolution, 
between the heirs of Philip Philipse and the State of New 
York, the State taking the confiscated shares of Beverly Rob- 
inson and Roger Morris. The farms were sold to various parties. 



CHAPTER VIII. 

THE OBLONG. 

THE eastern portion of Putnam county is a strip of land 
one mile, tbree quarters and twenty rods wide. This 
strip is a portion of what is known as the "Oblong" or 
"Equivalent Lands," the history of which is exceedingly 
curious. 

At the time of the early settlement of the colonies, the 
geography of the county was but little understood, and errone- 
ous descriiJtions led to endless controversies, not only between 
individuals but between townships and colonies as well. The 
boundary between the Dutch colony of New Amsterdam and 
the English colony of Connecticut was in the very earliest times 
a fruitful source of contention, the former claiming all lands 
west of Connecticut River, while the latter kept pushing their 
settlements along the shore of the Sound, till they extended 
beyond Byram River. ^ After a long and angry dispute, an 
agreement was concluded at Hartford on the 29th of September, 
1654. By this it was resolved that the boundaries between the 
Dutch and English on Long Island should be a line from the 
western part of Oyster Bay to the sea, and on the main land 
the bounds were to begin at the west side of Greenwich Bay 
and run in a northerly direction, twenty miles up into the 
country. Ten years later all this agreement was abrogated by 
the conquest of New Netherland and the establishment of the 
English rule in the province of New York. 

The controversy as to boundaries now became one between 
New York and Connecticut. On the 13th of October, 1664, the 
General Assembly of Connecticut appointed delegates to ac- 
company the governor to New York, for the purpose of con- 
gratulating the duke's commissioners and settling the bounda- 
ries between the colonies. Accordinglv, on the 2Sth of Octo- 



GENERAL HISTORY. 109 

ber, 1064, an agreement was made by which the boundaries be- 
tween New Yorl\; and Connecticut were fixed at twenty miles 
east of the Hudson River, running north from Long Island 
Sound, and parallel to the river. This was signed on the 1st of 
December, and the line established was to begin at the mouth 
of Mamaroneck Cr<^ek on the Sound and extend north-north- 
west to the line of Massachusetts, this being supposed to be 
parallel with the river, and was so stated in a letter from Gov. 
JNicolls to the Duke of York, in 1665. It was soon found that 
this idea was grossly erroneous, for the line would cross the 
Hudson River below West Point. The commotions and changes 
in the two colonies originated in the reconqnest of New York 
by the Dutch in 1669, and its surrender to the English soon 
after put a temporary stop to the agitation and no official nego- 
tiations took place till after 1680. In the mean time the Con- 
necticut people surveyed the line which as they said struck the 
Hudson River "below the new mills erected by Mr. Frederick 
Philipse. ' ' These mills were on a creek above the present village 
of Tarrytown, made famous by Irving's "Legend of Sleepy 
Hollow." This line was so eminently to the advantage of Con- 
necticut that it is not surprising that they stoutly claimed it, 
notwithstanding the manifest error, and the controversy soon 
began to assume formidable proportions. 

In 1683, a delegation was sent to Governor Dongan, to treat 
with him for a settlement of the boundaries, but they were 
privately instructed to insist upon the line running north-north- 
west from Mamaroneck and any deviation from it was to be 
ascribed to their desire "to oblige his honor and to promote 
a perpetual good correspondence'' between the two colonies. 
Governor Dongan and the New York Council insisted upon the 
line twenty miles east from the Hudson River and all that the 
representatives of Connecticut could obtain was permission to 
retain the settlements they had made on the Sound, in exchange 
for an equal tract further north. This agreement was made 
November 24th, 1083, and it established a boundary which has 
ever since remained. The bounds were to begin at the mouth 
of the Byram River and run up it to the head of tide water. 
A line was then to be run north-northwest, eight miles from the 
Sound; from this point another line was to be run 12 miles, 
parallel in its general course to the Sound; from the end of this 
line another line was to be run parallel to the Hudson River, 



110 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

and everywhere twenty miles from it, northerly to the Massa- 
chusetts line, and on the east side of this line a tract was to be 
laid off equal in acres to the amount yielded to Connecticut on 
the shores of the Sound. This tract so laid oflf was called the 
"Equivalent Lands" and the boundary was to be on its eastern- 
most side. 

This agreement was approved by Connecticut, May 8th, 16S4, 
and a surveyor and committee were appointed to lay out the 
line. They began at the mouth of Byram River, and measured 
up it to the head of tide water and then ran a line north-north- 
west six miles and a half, completing eight miles from the 
Sound. They then ran the line twelve miles east, parallel to the 
Sound, but as this point was found not to be twenty miles 
from the Hudson River, they continued it a mile and sixty-four 
rods, and there the point was fixed at the place of beginning of 
the line which was to run north to the Massachusetts line, and 
parallel to the river. A calculation was made of the land yielded 
to Connecticut, and it was found to be 61,440 acres. The width 
of the " Equivalent Lands " was calculated on the assumption 
that the line was 100 miles long. As this line was disadvanta- 
geous to Connecticut every possible means was tried to prevent 
it from being carried into effect and the records of legislation 
and official correspondence from 1718 to 1725 bear ample testi- 
mony to the ingenuity if to no other trait, for which the people 
of Connecticut have always been famous. The lines run in 1684 
remained for thirty-three years before any steps were taken to 
extend them and complete the transfer of territory from Con- 
necticut to New York. 

In 1717, the government of New York took steps to have the 
line determined, and made an effort to get Connecticut to unite 
in the undertaking. It seems that at the end of the twelve mile 
line parallel to the Sound there was a tree called the " Duke's 
tree." Connecticut claimed this as the starting point of the 
line to be run north, while New York refused to accept this 
point unless it was determined by actual measurement. The 
report made by a committee appointed by the Council of New 
York pretty clearly established the fact that the claim for the 
"Duke's tree " was a " Yankee trick," and that the true bounds 
were 30.5 rods beyond the place where the tree was supposed to 
stand. Nothing effectual was done till 1724, when Connecticut 
appointed commissioners and yielded all the points of the pre- 



GENERAL HISTORY. Ill 

vious contentions. In consideration for the Connecticut settlers 
near the line at Ridgefield, it was determined to make a crook 
in the boundary corresponding to the one in the Hudson River 
at Cortlandt's Point (now known as Verplanck's Point), conse- 
quently a line was measured due east from the western extrem- 
ity of Cortlandt's Point twenty miles, and to make the crook 
as great as possible it was agreed that the line should be meas- 
ured without any allowance for errors in chaining. A calcula- 
tion was then to be made of the width of the tract running the 
whole length of the two lines which extended from the line 
parallel with the Sound to the Massachusetts line. This tract 
was to be conveyed to New York and the east line was to be 
the boundary, it was also agreed that one compass should be 
used and that all measurements should be made on the surface 
of the ground. 

One of the objections made to running the line had been that 
certain poor families who had settled on the tract might be in 
danger of losing their lands, and it was agreed on both sides 
that such persons should receive a patent for the lands they 
had improved. They began the survey in 1725, and measured 
the various lines from the mouth of Byram River, to the end 
of the twelve mile line parallel to the Sound, marking every 
point with the utmost care, and there they stopped, leaving the 
line running north to be run at some future time. The tract of 
more than 60,000 acres thus to be acquired by New York, pre 
sented an opportunity too tempting to be resisted by land 
speculators of the last century. The "certain poor families " 
still remained in the same state of uncertainty as to whether 
they were to be in New York or Connecticut, and a partnership 
was formed by them with residents of New York, who had cap- 
ital, political influence and official position, and a plan was de- 
vised for ending their troubles. On the 3d of September, 1730, 
a petition was presented to the New York Council by Thomas 
Hauley and twenty-one others, setting forth that they were, as 
they supposed, residents npon the Equivalent Tract, where they 
had settled believing it to be in Connecticut, and that to de- 
prive them of their lands would impoverish them, and if they 
could have 50,000 acres of the Equivalent Lands, they would 
defray the charge of completing the boundary line, which had 
been siisi')ended for want of funds. 
This was agreed to by both colonies and surveyors and corn- 



112 HISTORY OF PUTNA3I COUNTY. 

missioners were appointed, and it was declared that when the 
work should be completed by the erection of monuments, the 
lines so designated should forever be the boundary line be- 
tween New York and Connecticut. The line was run to the 
Massachusetts line, in the spring of 1731. From the east end of 
the line, measured twenty miles due east from the end of Ver- 
planck's Point, a random line was run to the Massachusetts 
boundary. This was a little more than 50 miles long, and the 
north end on the Massachusetts line was found by measurement 
to be 132 rods too far west. This distance being measured 
off, a monument was erected at the true corner. The straight 
line between this monument and the east end of the twenty 
mile line from Verplanck's Point was then run by measuring 
perpendiculars from the random line at intervals of two miles, 
and the extremities of these offset lines were marked by heaps 
of stones. When the proper calculation was made the tract of 
Equivalent Land was found to be one mile, three-quarters and 
twenty rods wide. This tract was measured by running lines 
east from the heaps of stones in the direct line just measured, 
and the erection of heaps of stones opposite them, which 
heaps marked the boundary line between New York and Con- 
necticut. 

At the time of this survey there were but two or three roads 
crossing the line, and no villages near it, and the lands were en- 
tirely unsettled, except a few miles from the south end. The 
natural result of measuring the lines on the surface of the 
ground, which varied from level land to rough and precipitous 
mountains, was that the heaps of stones which marked the 
boundai-y between the two States of New York and Connecti- 
cut were not in a straight line, nevertheless they are the true 
boundary. The commissioners held a meeting at Dover after 
completing the survey, and there executed a deed, by wliich the 
Equivalent Lands were conveyed to New York and they have 
ever since formed a part of her territory. A patent for 50,000 
acres was granted to Hauley and his associates, in four separate 
tracts and embracing the greater part of the whole. The sur- 
veyor general was next directed to survey these lands for the 
purpose of division among the owners. This was done about 
1732. The maij made by Cadwallader Golden, is now among 
the Golden ixipers in the library of the New York Historical 
Society, and is the only map of any of the early surveys that 



GENERAL HISTORY. 113 

can be found. The land was divided among the Hauley pat- 
entees, who sold it to settlers and by this title the lands are 
now held. 

Owing to the fact that settlers could buy these lands, they were 
settled at an early day, and the "Oblong" was the original 
Southeast Precinct and had many inhabitants. The Oblong line 
is still well defined though in some places obliterated by the re- 
moval of fences by persons who own land on both sides of the 
line. Its location at various points is given in the sketches of 
the towns of Southeast and Patterson. The west line of the 
Oblong was marked by heaps of stones at intervals of two miles. 
The following is the description of these points as taken from 
the report of the commissioners. The first two monuments at 
the distance of two miles from the angle are in Westchester 
county. The next, or the sixth mile monument, is the first in 
Putnam county. 

" At the distance of six miles in the said line we set up a 
stake and heaped some stones around it on the top of a ridge 
for a monument which we esteemed to be about thirty rods 
East of a cedar swamp, and marked some trees on each side 
of said monument in a nearly North 12 degrees 30 minutes 
Course'." 

"At the distance of eight miles we set up a stake and heaped 
up some stones round it for a monument, being between two 
rocky hills, about four rods from the eastermost of them and 
marked some trees on each side of said monument'." 

"At the distance of ten miles we set up a stake and heaped 
up some stones round it for a monument being on the west side 
of a ridge of land and 66 chains on the perpendicular west from 
Croton River and marked some trees on each side of said monu- 
ment'." 

" At the distance of twelve miles we set up a stake and heaped 
some stones round it as a monument being at the east side of a 
hill near a point of rocks to the west of a great swamp and 
boggy meadow in said swamp in Croton River." [This twelve 
mile monument is on the land of Dr. Jonathan Seelev, about 40 

' This monument is opposite the cedar swamp, north of Peach Pond. The line 
runs tlirougli this lake. 

-The eight mile monument is on the land of Stephen Barnuni. about one-quar- 
ter mile north of the road to Jlilltown. 

■The ten mile monument is about 20 rods north of the Presbyterian Church at 
Doansburg. 



114 HISTORY OF PUTI^AM COUNTY. 

rods north of the road leading from his house to De Forrest's 
corners.] 

"At the distance of fourteen miles we set up a stake and 
heaped up some stones round it for a monument near on the 
top of a mountain being on the east side of the aforesaid Great 
Swamp and near the southwest end of the said mountains'.'' 

'•At the distance of sixteen miles- we set up a stake and 
heaped up some stones round it for a monument being on the 
northwest side of a brushy hill and marked some trees on each 
side of said monument'." 

"At the distance of eighteen miles we set up a stake and 
heaped up some stones round it for a monument, being on the 
north side of a small run of water and in a low piece of land 
and marked some trees on each side of said monument." [This 
eighteen mile monument is in the town of Pawlings, on the 
farm of Isaac Aikin. It is about one quarter mile north of the 
northeast corner of the Philipse Patent. This monument was 
two chains and two rods north from the northwest corner 
of the Oblong Lot No. 23.] 

Of the tract granted to Thomas Hauley and his associates 
44,250 acres were released to Adam Ireland, John Thomas and 
Benjamin Birdsall, June loth, 1731. The deed is recorded in 
Dutchess County Records, Liber N"., Page 302, and these 
parties sold Lots 23 and 16 to Jacob Haviland, jr., June 16th, 
1731. 

The original line between JS'ew York and Connecticut was es- 
tablished by the commissioners who run the Oblong line, by 
measuring lines perpendicular from the Oblong line, from each 
of the before mentioned monuments which were two miles dis- 
tant from each other. The following is the description of the 
monuments which were placed to mark the Connecticut line: 

" The monument corresponding to the monument at six miles 
distance as aforesaid is a stake with a heap of stones round it 
near the north end of a swamp and by a foot-path leading to 
Danbury'." 

"The monument corresponding to the monument of eight 

' This fourteen mile monument is on the top of the mountains nortli of the 
Jlethodist chapel at •' Cowle's Corners." 

■-'The 10 mile monument is nearl.v east from " Aikin"s Corners" and near 
where tlie road running east from the school house crosses the Oblong line. 

•'This is on a strip of dry land between two swamps, the old foot-path running 
on this ridjre. 



GEXEEAL HISTORY. llo 

miles distance as aforesaid, is a stake and heap of stones round 
it in a liollow upon a high rocky hill'.'' 

"The monument corresponding to the monument at ten 
miles distance as aforesaid is a stake with a heap of stones 
round it in a springy ground on the west side of a high hilF." 

"The monument corresponding to the monument at twelve 
miles distance as aforesaid was set up at the end of two miles 
on a line running nearly north 12 degrees 30 minutes east from 
the monument corresponding to the monument at ten miles dis- 
tance, because we could not carry the perpendicular across the 
Great Swamp, that was overflowed by Croton river; and we 
marked the trees in the said two miles with 3 notches on the 
north and south sides. This monument is a heap of stones 
round a small white oak tree'." 

"The monument corresponding to the monument at fourteen 
miles distance is a stake and heap of stones standing on the 
northwest side of a hiir." 

"The monument corresponding to the monument at six- 
teen miles distance is a stake and heap of stones on a high hill, 
there being two small ponds to the south east eastward of the 
monument, the nearest to which is about 5 rods to the monu- 
ment." [This monument is on top of Cranberry Mountain.] 

"The monument corresponding to the monument at eighteen 
miles distance as aforesaid is a stake and heap of stones on a 
ledge of rocks on the west side of a hill." [This monument 
was found in ISGO. It is north of the county line.] 

In 1855 commissioners were appointed by the State of Con- 
necticut to unite with commissioners to be appointed by New 
York to ascertain and settle the boundary line. In accordance 
with a joint resolution of the Legislature of New York, passed 
April 5th, 1856, Gov. Myron H. Clark appointed Hon. Benjamin 
Field, of Orleans county, Hon. Samuel D. Backus, of Kings, 
and Col. Jonathan Tarbell, of Essex, to be commissioners on 
the part of New York. 

'This is on the top of Joe's Hill and about CO rods south of tlie road from 3IiU- 
town to Danbury. 

■This monument is in a piece of meadow lately belonging to Seneca Salmons, 
who reni(5ved the stones. The hole made in the ground by the heap of stones was 
still visible in ISOO, when the line was re-surveyed. 

"Tlie commissioners in ISCO could find no trace of this monument. 

■•This monument was found in ISGO. A small maple tree had grown up through 
it crowding o(f the up|ier stones but leaving the foundation intact. 



116 HISTORY OF PUTXA.M COUNTY. 

The commissioners of both States met but no agreement 
could be made between them. Connecticut insisted on a straight 
line from the corner monument on the Massachusetts line to the 
angle in Westchester county, while New York insisted that the 
line should run through the ancient monuments erected by the 
former commissioners in 1731, although that line woiild not be 
straight, as they were not authorized to make a new line but to 
ascertain and perpetuate the old one. All efforts to agree 
proving fruitless, the commissioners of New York made report 
to the Senate in 1857, giving a full history of the case. By an 
Act of Legislature, passed April 4th, 1860, "The commission- 
ers were directed and empowered to survey the line between the 
States and to mark it with suitable monuments as fixed by 
the survey of 1731." The commissioners were to give one 
month's notice to the Connecticut commissioners and if they 
refused or neglected to attend, they were to run the line with- 
out them. They accordingly surveyed the line (Connecticut 
commissioners not consenting) and made report to the New Y^'ork 
Senate, in 1861. The old monuments were found and identified 
and monuments of sawed marble eight inches square and stand- 
ing out of ground about two and a half feet were placed at road 
crossings and other suitable i^laces. For reasons given before a 
line connecting the ancient monuments would not be straight. 
For the sake of the curious, the course of the line as then run 
is given as far as Putnam county is concerned:' From 6 mile 
monument to 8 mile monument, N. 10° 19' E., 159 ch., 28 L. 
From 8 mile monument to 10 mile monument, N. 12°, 24' E., 
155 ch., 71 L. From 10 mile monument to 14 mile monument, 
N. 10°, 51' E., 813 ch., 41 L. From 14 mile monument to 
16 mile monument, N. 10°, 11' E., 161 ch., 7 L. From 16 
mile monument to 18 mile monument, N. 12°, 19' E., 157 ch., 
15 L. 

The south line of the county runs about half a mile south 
of the six mile monument. The course between the six 
mile and the four mile monument in Westchester is south 12°, 
20' W. 

In 1879, by an Act of Legislature of the State of New Y'ork, 
the secretary of State, the attorney general, and the State 

'The <list;ince in the new survey was made on horizontal distances wliich 
accounts for ditlerences. 



GENERAL HISTOKY. II7 

engineer and surveyor were appointed commissioners to meet 
with commissioners appointed by the State of Connecticut to 
establish the boundary between the States. A settlement of 
the long vexed question was finally made, and the line as run 
and marked by the New York commissioners in 1S60 was 
agreed upon as the boundary line between the two States. 



CHAPTER IX. 

SETTLEMENT AND POPULATION. 

AT the time when Dutchess countj^ was established, in 1683, 
the whole region was almost without inhabitants. The 
historian, Smith, writing about 1750, says, " The inhabitants on 
the banks of the river are Dutch but those more easterly are 
Englishmen who have for the most part emigrated frdm Con- 
necticut and Long Island. The growth of the county has been 
very sudden, and commenced but a few years ago. Within 
the memory of people now living it did not contain above 
twelve families." The following copy of a letter which was 
formerly in possession of T. Van Wyck Brinkerhoflf of East 
Fishkiil, may throw some light on the early settlement of 
Dutchess county. 

"In the year 1723, I saw Isaac Upton a coaster from New 
Port who informed me that about 1760 he came up the North 
river to Poughkeepsie, and in company with another person 
went to Mabbitt's store in Washington on business. That on 
their return they took a circuitous route from Pleasant Valley 
and passed the house of a German by the name of Hoffman 
who was then 118 years old. He supposed himself to be the 
first settler in Dutchess county. When young he deserted from 
a Dutch ship of war in New York, squatted where he then 
lived, built him a shanty and lived a number of years a solitary 
life without being able to find a white woman for a wife. After- 
ward he found a German family at Rhinebeck; married and lived 
where he then was to that advanced age. I was informed that 
he died two years afterward at the age of 120. 

"Paul Uptox." 

In 1723, the whole population of Dutchess county was re- 
ported to be 1,083. What is now Putnam county was included 
in the "South Ward," and the following list gives the names 
of the taxable inhabitants in that district, at that time. 



GENERAL HISTORY. 119 

"The Inhabitants, Residents, and Freeholders of Dutchess 
County (South Ward) are rated and assessed by ye assessors 
for the same the 16th day of Jan. Annoque Dom. 1623-4: Juerie 
Springsteen, 9 pounds; Joseph Arkils, 6; Isaac Hardicke, 14; 
F'eter Du Bois, 2n; Robert Denze, 7; Johannes Peter, 5; Johan- 
nes Mettler, 10; James Hussey, 25; The widow of Gerrit Vel- 
dit, 25; John Buys, S; John Montross, 14; Abraham Buys, 9; 
Johannes Buys, 9; Jacobus Swartwout, 12; Francis De Lange, 
23; Daniel Boss, 15; Jacob Mousuer, 6; John Schouten, 12; 
Peter Lassink, 20; Lawrence Lassink, 8; Jury Mousuer. 5; 
Alexander Grigs, 12; Johannes Osterom, 5; Henderick Boss, 5; 
Rich. Lounsbury, 5; Peter Arkils, 10; Peter Stringal, 5; The 
widow of Roger Brett, deceased, 50; Nicholas Walder, 7; Hen- 
drick Philipse, 8; The widow of Everet Jong, 6; Johannes Ter 
Boss, 32; and for the land of Mr. Andrew Teller in his posses- 
sion, 18, in all 50; Johannes Ter Boss, Jr., 12; John De Lange, 
5; Andrus Frederick Peck, 9; Jans Snider, 110; The widow of 
Simon Schouten, 16; Wm. Lassink, 11; David Brill, 5; Isaack 
Lassing, 8; Wm. Schut, 8; Jacobus Ter Boss, 5; Cornelius Bo- 
gardus, 5; Jan Crankhyt, Jr., 6; Tax £27, 3s; £543." 

The list is small, but small as it is none of the persons named 
are positively known to have been living on the Philipse Patent. 
In the statement of David Nimham, the Indian sachem, pre- 
sented to the governor and Council, in 1765, it is stated that 
about 40 years before, sundry persons began to settle upon the 
land as tenants of Adolph Philipse, and it also seems that some 
whites were settlers on the land as tenants of the Indians them- 
selves. It seems to be well established that as early as 1740 
there was quite a number of inhabitants. The fact that when 
the survey and division of the patent was made in 1754, an 
'■ Old meeting house'' standing in the northwest corner of Lot 
9 is mentioned as a landmark, would indicate a population suf- 
ficiently large to establish a church at least twenty years be- 
fore that date. These were the "Englishmen who came from 
Connecticut and Long Island," as mentioned by Smith. About 
1740, there was a large number of families who emigrated to 
this region from Cape Cod. Others came from the bordering 
towns in Connecticut, while the Townsends, Holmes, Fields 
and Hortons are prominent examples of the families who came 
from Long Island. 

The lands in the tract called the Oblouo-, next to the Connec- 



120 HISTORY OF PUTXAM COUNTY. 

ticut line, were speedily settled, it is said, because lands could 
be purchased, with an indisputable title. It was not the policy 
of the owners of the Philipse Patent to sell their lands, and so 
far as ascertained a tract of 245 acres sold by Colonel Morris 
and his wife to William Hill, in 1765, was the first tract that 
was actually sold out of the whole patent. The various lots 
were surveyed and divided into farms of various sizes, and 
leased to tenants who paid an annual rent. In some cases the 
leases were given in perpetuity, and when the owner sold por- 
tions of his farm, he took care to charge the part sold with a 
due proportion of the rent as a part of the consideration. An 
instance is the Dickenson farm, which is mentioned in the 
sketch of the town of Carmel. The following affidavit shows 
the names of some of the early settlers: 

"AFFIDAVIT OF TIMOTHY SHAW, 1767. 

" Sworn says that he formerly was a tenant under Adolph 
Philipse deceased within the Patent commonly called the Upper 
Patent, being the land now claimed by Beverly Robinson, Roger 
Morris and Philip Philipse, and that he is very well acquainted 
with all the settlements that have been made in the said Upper 
Patent, within the last twenty-five years. That when he first 
became acquainted with the said Upper Patent the following per- 
sons were settled thereon and held as he understood from them 
as tenants under Adolph Philipse, to wit Philip Minthorne, 
Elisha Tompkins, John Tompkins, Wm. Hunt, Daniel Town - 
send, John Dickenson, James Dickenson, John Sprague, Wm. 
Sturdevant, Ira Hill, Moses Northrup Sen., Thomas Philipse, 
George Hughson, James McCrady, Samuel Fields, Amos Dick- 
enson, Hezekiah Wright, Jeremiah Calkins, John Calkins, 
Joseph Porter, Ichabod Vickery, Ebenezer King, Samuel Jones, 
James Paddock, Peter Paddock, David Paddock, John Eagles- 
ton, two brothers of the name of Bircham, John Kiel, Wm. 
Bardsley, Thomas Kirkam, Nathaniel Robinson, one Cole, Wm. 
Smith, John Smitli, Nathaniel Underhill, Edward Stevens, one 
Barton, John Reynolds, and a great many other persons, and 
this deponent really believes that there were upward of three 
hundred settlers on said Patent (as tenants of the PhiliiDse 
family) upward of three miles from Hudson river, before the 
year 175G. That either two or three years ago, in the winter 
season the said Philip Philipse was at the house of Uriah Law- 



GENERAL HISTORY. 121 

rence one of the tenants, where Daniel Nimham, the Indian 
together witli at least 300 persons chiefly tenants of said, 
Philipse were assembled, and that the said Philipse then and 
there in his liearing and in the hearing of as many as could con- 
veniently crowd near enough to hear what passed, asked the said 
Niniham where the lands were which he claimed, whereupon 
the said Ximham said that he had no lands. Upon which the 
said Philip Philipse asked the said Nimham, why he made such 
a Rout among the tenants, to which he answered, that he was 
told to do so by Stephen Cowenham and One Pound pocktwo 
and other Indians. That the said Nimham never to his knowl- 
edge lived within the bounds of the said Patent', and that all 
the Indians who formerly lived in the Patent had abandoned it 
long before the year 1756, and settled as this deponent as been 
informed beyond Minnisink, near Delaware. 

his 
TuroTHi' X Shaw. 
■" Done this 6th day of March ) Mark. 

1767 before me \ 

" Daniel Horsmanden." 

tax list of philip philipse patent, 1777. 

" List of the taxable inhabitants of Philipse Patent in the 
year 1777. South East Precinct, (Oblong): Joseph Crane, 4; 
Joseph Field, 4; Benjamin Townsend, 4; Isaac Crosby, 3; Simeon 
Rider, 4; Xathaniel Foster, 3; Nathan Green, 1; Tho. Foster, 
6; Tho. Gage, 2; James Birdsall, 8; Matthew Burgis, 4; Matthew 
Benedict, 2; Elihu Gage, 3; Samuel Benedict, 1; Steph. Rock- 
Avell, 1; John June, 1; Ebenezer Gage, 2; Tho. Baldwin, 5; 
Nathan Birdsall, 4; Zebulon Biiggs, 2; Roger Haviland, 3; Jesse 
Lane, 3; Benj. Sears, 4; Shaw Youngs, 2; Tho. Burgis, 1; Wm. 
Stone, 2; Daniel Haviland, 6; Martin Hall, 3; Benj. Hopkins, 
2; Wm. Penney, 3; Tho. Sears, 3; Asa Barnum, 3; Roderick 
McKinsy, 1; Mark Gage, 1; David Penney, 1; Ebenezer Hum- 
stead, 2; John Purdy, 1; Joseph Arnold, 1; John Hopkins, 1; 
AVm. March, 1; Joseph Fields, 2; Wm. Young, 1; Edward Rice, 1; 
Elihu Youngs, 1; Wm. Mott, 5; Ri. Honeywell, 1; John Star, 
1; Jacob Millard, 1; Samuel Spencer, 1; Solomon Haviland, 1; 

' In a survey of thi? north line of the Highlands made by John Alsop about 
ITii.^. Ximhaufs wigwaiu is represented as north of the mountains, in theto%vnof 
Fishkill. 



122 HISTORY OF put:^.^^ county. 

Gilbert Steadwell, 4; Reuben Ryder, 1; The. Clements, 1: Elias 
Jones, 1; Solomon Crane, 1; Nathaniel Foster, Jr., 2;° Elijah 

Doty, 3: Elnathan ]\[arch, 2: Rowland Russell, 1; Nick- 

ersou, — ; Peter Field, 2; Tho. Sentier, 1; Joseph Studwell's 
Farm, 2; Joseph Burtis, 1; Zach. Hinman on Hoag's farm, 1; 
Silas Burtis, 1; Ichabod Humstead, 1; Zebulon Crane, 1; Sam- 
uel Field, 4; Uriah Townsend, 1; Robert Townsend, 4; Benj. 
Sears, 4; Samuel Bangs, 6: Samuel Elwell, 2; Seth Nickerson, 
6; Peter Hall, 4: John Field, 7; Noah Smith, 2; Joshua Bea- 
man, 3; Isaac Elwell, 3; Anthony Gage, 1; Jabez Elwell, 2; Ebe- 
nezer Benedict, 1; Benj. Haviland, 6; Joshua Barnum, Jr., 1; 
Moss Kent, 2; John Corly, 1; Seth Sears, 2; Samuel Hall, 3; 
Nathan Green, Jr., 3, John Haviland, 1; Tho. Higgins, 2; Ebe- 
nezer Ryder, 2; Seth Nickerson, 2; Benj. Higgins, 2; Joseph 
Hall, 7; Charles CuUen, 4; Jonathan Green, 1; John Purdy, 1; 
Tho. Comstock, 4; Nathaniel Humstead, 1; Wm. Clinton, 1; 
Steph. Morehouse, 1; John Foster, 1; Tho. Birdsall, 3; John 
Elwell, 1; Wni. Penney 4; Seth Sears, 2; James Haviland, 1; 
Jonathan Corly, 1: Jeremiah Burgis, 1; Moses Gage, 1; Geo. 
Bentinck, 1; Ichabod Goremans, 1; James Stedwell, 1; Isaac 
Haviland, 2; Caleb Spencer, 1: Barns. Hatfield, 4; Wm. Field, 
4; Zadoc Ryder, 1; John Wheeler Foster, 1; Silvanus Gage, 1; 
Mary Ryder, 1; John Crosby, 2; Eliakim Barnum, 1; Benaijah 
Tubbs, 1; Elias Benjamen, 2: Jonathan Paddock's farm, 1; Daniel 
Gage, 1; Eleagar Burlison, 1; Daniel Griffin, 1; Daniel Burtis, 
1; Tho. Haviland, 2; on the Rev. Mr. Kent's farm, Conon, 1, 
Knott, 1; English, 1. 

■ "Fredericksburg Precinct: Elijah Tompkins, 2; David Pad- 
dock, 2; James Dickenson, estate, 3; Daniel Townsend, 1; John 
Newbury, 6; Josiah Baker, 4; David Crosby, 3; Joshua Crosby, 
3; Theophilus Jones, 1; Tho. Kelley, 1; James Covan, 1; Jona- 
than Kelley, 2; Silas Paddock, 2; Charles Townsend, 2; Robert 
Townsend, 1: Tho. Paddock, 3; Peter Angevine's estate, 4; 
Jonathan Paddock, 4; Jonathan Paddock's widow, 1; Isaac 
Pearce, 2; John Yeoman's estate, 3; Jonathan Bryant, 2; 
Michael Shaw, Jr., 1; David Aikins, 4; Heman King, 8; Reuben 
Kelly, 2; Ebenezer Robinson, 3; John Rhoads, 1; Jacob Phil- 
ipse, Jr., 1; Nathan Crosby, 4; Hezekiah Mead, 1; Tho. Fow- 
ler, 2; Daniel Brundage, 5; Jeremiah Whitney, 2; Ebenezer 
Brown, 1; Reuben Crosb}', 2; Peter Bunker, 1; Joseph North- 
rop, 2; Hezekiah Mead, 2; Robert Hiighson, 3; James Covey, 



GENERAL HISTORT. 123 

2; Peter Maybee, 3; Joseph Gaming, 2; Ebenezer Jone's widow, 
2; Cornelius Fuller, 2; John Dickenson, 7; Wm. Palmer, 2; 
Robert Mooney, 1; Tho. Smith, 4; Wm. Penney, 3; Isaac Chap- 
man, 1; Edmund Batner, 2; Moody Howse, 4; Elisha Cole, 5; 
Simeon Ellis, 2; Samuel Peters, 6; Benjamin Townsend, 2; 
Robert Shaw, 2; Peter Badeau, 3; Jabez Berry, 2; Michael 
Slott, 3; Wm. Hill, 10; John Minch, 3; Peleg Weekson (Wixon), 
1; John Jean, 2; Jeremiah Hughson, 3; Widow Hill, 1; Jona- 
than Hopkins, 2; Caleb Fowler, 8; Abraham Maybee, Jr., 2; 
Daniel Bull, 4; Ebenezer Bennett, 1; John Garrison, 1; Edward 
Rice, 4; Josiah Swift, 2; Solomon Jenkins, 4; Solomon Field, 
4; Nehemiah Jones, 4; David Crosby, Jr., 4; Moss Kent, 7; 
Joseph Yickney, 1; Barzillai King, 2; Isaac Lounsbury, 7; Wm. 
Merritt, 3; John Lounsbury, 4; Andrew Rubly, 1 ; Jacob Ellis, 
2;- Moses Fowler, 9; Ebenezer Lockwood, 2; David Hawkins, 1; 
Gilbert Dickenson, estate, 4; Tho. Adams, 1; Capt. Brown, 2; 
Joseph Colwell, 3; Solomon Hopkins, 5; Wm. Underhill, 2; 
Caleb Palmer, 1; Henry Wooden, 3; Elisha Cool, Jr., 2; Charles 
Anwah, 3; Moses Mead, 1; James Baldwin, 1; Richard Airs, 1; 
James Carl, 2; Timothy Hatch, 2; Zebulon Bass's widow, 1; 
Isaac Secor, 2; John Bates, 1; Seth Paddock, 4; Elijah Week- 
son (Wixon), 1; Christopher Townsend, 1; Isaac Barritt, 1; 
Benoni Gray, 1; Tho. Baxter's estate, 1; Andrew Beardsley, 1; 
Tho. Menzies, 13; Roswell Wilcox, 4; Michael Nowland, 1; 
James Calkins, 1; Benjamin Birdsall, 3; Joseph Hawkins, 2; 
Johnson Dakin, 1; Elijah Fuller, 2; Jacob Maybee, estate, 1; 
John Kelley, 2; Nathan Cool, 2; Charity Austin, Moses Knap, 
3; JohuTerril, 5; Daniel Peane, 2; Joshua Burdock, 1; Jedediah 
Willis, 2; Caleb Vail, 2; David Cowen, 2; Robert Wright, 2; 
Daniel Knap, 3; Lemuel Wilmott, estate, 2; John Dean, 1; John 
Dan, 1; Phineas Baker, 1; Matthew Patterson, 3; John. McLean, 
2; Hackaliah Merritt, 3; Wm. Braidy, 4; Nathan Disbrow, 1; 
John Carpenter, 4; Richard Williams, 1; John AVilson, 1; Da- 
vid Merrick, 2; John Yeomans, 1; John Thomas Craft, 1; Samuel 
Rhoads, 4; Samiiel Dickenson, 4; Timothy Delavan, 2; Tho. 
Furguson, 1; Isaac Merritt, 1; Reuben Chase, 1; Theodorus 
Crosby, 3; Malcom Morrison, 12; Wm. Yeomans, 2; Samuel 
Washburn, 6; James Barret, 1; Jonathan Stockman, 1; 
Jeremiah Burgis, 3; Isaac Rushny, 1; Samuel Carl, 2; 
Abner Crosby, 2; Abner Crosby, Jr., 2; John Birdsall, 
estate, 2; Alexander Menzie's estate, 4; Stephen Field, 7; 



124 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

Nehemiah Wood, 2; John Tompkins, 1: James Townsend, 
1; James Forster, 2; John Studvvell, 4; Robert Watts, 4; 
Henry Luddint^ton, 4; David Heacock, 2; Joshua Conklin, 2; 
Matthew Lane's farm, 1; Joseph Philipse, 3; Isaac Austin, 1; 
Samuel Horton, 1; Zachariah Paddock, 2; Timothy Shaw, 2; 
Nathaniel Dickerson's widow, 1; Joseph Cool, 2; Samuel Knif- 
fen, 2; Lazarus Griffin, Jr., 1; Uriah Raymond, 2; George Pen- 
ney, 1; Israel Wood, estate, 4; Daniel Seelass, 2; John Town- 
send, 2:. Richard Truesdill, 2; Dennis Wright. 4; Asa 
Hains, 2; Caleb Dean, 1; Tho. Carl, estate, 3; Comfort 
Luddington, 2; Daniel Wilson, 3; Wm. Col well, 3; John 
Piatt, 2; Oliver Mead, 1; Tho. Lynch, 2; John Crane, 3: John 
Wright, near J. Griffin, 3; Daniel Robert, 3; Tho. Peters, 
estate, 2; Daniel Ketchum, 3; John Sinclair, 2; Tho. Kirkham, 
■2; Wm. Calkins, 2; Samuel Terry, 2; John Terry, 1 ; David 
Fuller, 1; Tho. Hall, 3; David Frost, 2; Wm. Mead, 1; Charles 
Surine, 2; John Clark, 2; Levi Townsend, 1; Henry Laight, 1; 
Silvanus Kelly, 1; Zebedee Kelly, 1; Joshua Philips, 2; James 
Eggleston, 1; Joseph Dykeman, 2; David Vickney, 1; Jehiel 
Stephens, 1; Tertullus Dickenson, 13; Charles Agor, 1; Samuel 
Jones, 2; Tho. Nickerson, 1; Matthew Bump, 1; Gilbert 
Gannung, estate, 1; Alexander Kidd, 3; Charles Theal, 3; 
Abraham Moo (]), 1; Lemuel Fuller, 2; Wm. Jones, 1; Edward 
Arnold, 1; Jeremiah Bailey, 1; Jacob Gannung, 1; James Cox, 
9; Josiah Gregory, 1; Samuel Jenkins, 1; Josiah Aikin's farm, 
1; Duncan McGregory, 1; Ebenezer Washburn, 1; Robert 
Fuller, 2; Solomon Byington, 1; Stephen Baker, 2; Isaac 
Everitt, 2: Samuel Bang's farm, 1; James Birdsall, 2; David 
Wells, 1; Mahar Nelson, 2; Comfort Chadwick, 1; David Hill, 
1; Silas Austin, 1; Nathaniel Rubly, 1; Seth Paddock. Jr., 2; 
Nathan Palmer, 1; David Fowler, 3; Joseph Sunderland, estate, 
1; Peter Win, 1; Isaac Bates, 1; Moses Knap, Jr., estate, 2; 
AVm. Wooden, 2; Nathan Paddock, 1; John Maybee, 2; David 
Waterbury, 2; Ezekiel Dean, 2; Josiah Baker, Jr., 2; John 
Fuller, 1; Isaiah Hopkins, 1; John Smitli, 1; Charles Arvah, 
Jr., 2; Zebulon Kirkham, 2; Jacob Kniffen, 4; Shubell Week- 
son, 1; John Barrett, 1; Jonathan Parrish, 2; David Kelly, 1; 
Jolin White, 1; Peleg Bailey, 1; Obadiah Chase, 2; Tho. 
Hinkley, 1; John Warring, 4; Roger Morris, estate, 12; Absalom 
Yeomans, 1; John Smith, 1; Josiah Jones, 2; Peter Brewer, 1; 
John Dan, Jr., 1; David King, 1; John Secor, 2; Simeon Tryon, 



GENERAL HISTORY. 125' 

1; John Frost, 2; Xathaniel Sinclair, 3; Nathaniel Finch, 1: 
Frederick Pickney, 1; Jeremiah Mead, 1; Samuel Haines, 1; 
Samuel Bruyster, 1; John Haines, 2; John Gannung, 1; Oliver 
Bates, 1; Caleb Hazen, 2; Elijah Townsend, 1; Joseph Chandler, 
1; Ephraim Nickerson, 1; Isaac Everitt, Jr., 1; George Everitt, 
1; John Field's farm, 2; John Tweedy' s farm, 2; Gilbert 
Hyatt, 1; John Williams' estate, 2; Elijah Oakley, 2; Increase 
Bennett, 1; David Smith, 2; Isaac Birdsall, 1; Wm. Palmer, Jr., 
1; Eli Crosby. 2; Wm. Lovelace, 1; Zebu! on Washburn, 2; 
Abraham Birdsall, 1; Peter Anderson, 4; Joseph Gregory, 2; 
Lewris Ferguson, 1; Wm. Griffin, 1; Gilbert Merritt, 1; Edward 
Penney, 2; Nehemiah Smith, 2; John Philipse, 2; Samuel 
Gregory, 1; Reuben Hinkley, 1; David Garrison, 1; Daniel 
Cool, 2; Samuel Jones, Jr., 1; Amos Burlison, 1; Eleazer Hamb 
lin, 2; Elnathan Doane, 1; James Bryer, 1; Abraham Hill, 2; 
Wm. SjDringer, estate, 1; Samuel Hitchcock, estate, 1; Jonathan 
Burtis, 1; Joshua Calkins, 1; John Raymond, 1; Peter Roberts, 
1; Reuben Ferris, 5; Cornbury Merritt, 1; Stephen Umsted, 1; 
Joseph Fid, 4; Elisha Gifford, 1; John Green, 1; Isaac Smith's 
estate, 2; Stephen Paddock, 1; Nathan Sturdevant, 1; Jacob 
Disbury, 1; Allen Cameron, estate, 2; Dr. Samuel and Richard 
Bryant, 2; John Stuart, 1; Joseph White, 1; John Lester, 1; 
Solomon Crosby, 3; John Kent, G; Moses Buckley, 2; James 
Dickenson, Jr., 3; Freeman Hopkins, 2; Elisha Smith, 1; Henry 
Baldwin, 1; Joel Mead, 3; Gilbert Drew, 2; Richard Price, 2; 
Samuel Conklin, 1; Caleb Peers, 1; Nathaniel Bailey, 1; Elijah 
Hunt, 1; Wm. Hitchcock, 1; Anthony Hill, 1; Joseph Matthews, 
1; Jacob Birdsall, 1; James Surine, 1; Justus Barrett, 1; Richard 
Barker, 1; Jedediah Davis, estate, 1; Nathan Teed, l;aMoses 
Wintez', 2; Joshua Merrick, 2; Samuel Towner, 5; Josiah 
Crosby, 1; Moses Richards, 3; Ezra Smith, 2; Husted on 
Hunt's farm, 3: John Slott's estate, 2; Uriah Wright's estate, 
2; John Lamorieau, 2; John Berry, l;Job Burlison, 1; Solomon 
Lockwood, 2; Eleazar Baker, 2; Daniel Doane, 1; John Bea 
(Beyea), 2; Amos Fuller, 2; Isaac Gannung, 2; Joshua Main, 2; 
Jeremiah Burtis, 2; Isaac Townsend, 1; Jacob Mead, 3; Con- 
stant Nickerson' s estate, 1; John Robinson, near Robinson's 
store, 1; James Darby, 1; Wm. Peter's estate, 2; Wm. Birdsall, 
1; Moody Howes, Jr., 1; James Green, 2; Nathaniel Paddock, 
1; John HoUiday, 1; John McLean on Capt. McDonald's farm, 
2; Mr. David Cluos, 2; John Henderson, 1: John Chase, 1: 



126 HISTOKY OF PUTNAM COUXTY. 

Thadeus Warring, 1: Peter Hatfield, 4; Jacob Reede, 2; Henry 
Lockwood, 1; Benjamin Cheeseman, 2; Wm. Craft's estate, 
1; Elisha Baldwin, 2; Marcus Brundage, 1; Joseph Hop- 
kins, 1; Tho. Russell, 1; John Vermilya, 2; Solomon 
Kirkham, 1; Elisha Harris, 1; Henry Lewis, 2; Joseph 
Hitchcock at the store, 1; Wm. Hudden, 1; Samuel 
Giflord, 1; James Crawford, 1; Major Simpkins, 1; John 
Barrit, Jr., 1; Daniel Gregory, 2; Solomon Wood, 1; Ben- 
jamin Dean, 1; James Haight, 1; Henry Craft's estate, 1; 
Henry Charlock, 1; Thomas Horton, 1; Joseph Moss, 1; Wm. 
Carl, 2; John Price, 1; Zebulon Townsend, 1; Ammiel Penny, 
2; Jabish Chase, 1; Oliver Fox, 1; John Crap, 1; Samuel Peer's 
estate, 2; Abraham Covert, 2; Richard Chapman, 2; Conrad 
Harps, estate, 1; Wm. Hughson, 1; James Barrit, Jr., 1; 
Ezekiel Bugbee, 2; Wm. Barrit, 1; Doctor Hamilton, 1; John 
Merrit, 2; Zebulon Wright, 1; Peter Arvah, 1; Wm. Vermilyer, 
1; Stephen Hyatt, 1; John Munrow, 1; Isaac Chase, 1; Shubael 
Dimmock, 1; John Utter, 1; James Wilson, S; David North, 2; 
Eli Woods, 2; Benjamin Golden, estate, 3; Wm. Snow, 1; Sil- 
vanus Travis, l;_Tho. Swain, 1; Joel Borland, 1; Northrop 
Fuller, 1; Eliston on Zophar Ketcham's farm, 1; Isaiah Bennet, 
1; Jabez Smith, 1; Isaac Purdoe, 1; Caleb Brundage, 1; Eleazar 
Hazen, 2; Daniel Brundage, Jr., 1; Tho. Gregory, 1; Samuel 
Wilson, 1; Isaac Fuller, 1; Wm. Lawrence, 2; Mary Haines, 
widow, 1; Noah Hill, 1; Robert Craig's estate, 1; Amos Towns- 
end, 1; Elnathan Gregory, 1; Israel Knap, 2; Benjamin Knap, 
1; Joseph Randell, 1; Tho. Carl, Jr., estate, 1; Wm. Dutton, 1; 
John Shaw, 1; Wm. Falconier, 1; Tho. Ellis, 1; Johnson Yeo- 
mans, 1; Richard Sturdevant, 1; Ezekiel Kirkham, 1; John 
Ferguson, 1; Jacob Sagua, estate, 1; Tho. Donaldson, estate, 1; 
Stephen Booth, 1; Zophar Kirkham, 1; Enoch Shaw, 1; Daniel 
Crawford, 1; Philip Smith, 1; Joseph Hitchcock, Jr., 1; Hen- 
drick Slott, 1; Samuel Haight, 1; James McFarland, 1; John 
Langdon, 1; Rachael Simmins, 2; Joshua Brundage, 1; Uriah 
Townsend, 1; Nathan Disbury, Jr., 1; Moses Crosby, 1; Eph- 
raim Jones, 2; John Yermilya on Dickinson's farm, 1; Absalom 
Simmons, 2; David Aikin, Jr., 1; Mr. James Sayer's estate, 2; 
Peter Chapman, estate, 1; Stephen Griffith, 1; Beverly Robin- 
son, Jr., farm, 10; The Mungis farm, 1; Wm. Higbee. 2; John 
Brown, 1; John Place, 1; Ebenezer Cole, 1; Nathaniel Jenkins, 
1; Russell Gregory, 1; Seth Kirkham, 1; Samuel Knifl'en, Jr., 



GENERAL HISTORY. 127 

1; Joshua Gregory, 1; Isaac Slott, 1; Gilbert Shaw, 1; Marcus 
Barrit, 1; George Curry Sen., 1; John Thurston, 1. 

''Philipse Precinct: — Wm. Davenport, 1; Jacob Mandeville, 
8; John Rogers, 3; Timothy Conklin, 5; Thomas Davenport, lo; 
Capt. Peter Dubois, 12; John Van Amburg, estate, 4; George 
Lane, 3; Isaac Rhoads, 5; Christopher Fowler, 1; John Nelson, 
2; Wm. Dusenbury, 5; Richard Hopper, 1; Samuel Drake, Jr. 
1; Solomon Smith, 2; Joseph Husted, 7; Beverly Robinson, 
70; Tho. Saris, 1; Caleb Nelson, 3; Peter Drake's farm, 2; John 
Armstrong, 2; Wm. Gee, 3; Robert Oakly, 1; John Win, 1; Reu- 
ben Bunn, 1; John Birger, 1; Philip Steenbaugh, 1; Nathaniel 
J agger, 1; Benjamin Bloomer, 1; Samuel Yeomans, 1; Moses 
Dusenbury, 5; Henridge's widow, 2; Gilbert Budd, 2; Wm. 
Wright, 3; Jonathan Pine, Jr., 1; John Avery, 2; Richard Din- 
nis, o; Israel Knap, 3; Jonathan Odell, 1; Wm. Colgrove, 2; 
John McDonald, 1; Samuel Warren, 2; David Lane's farm, 2; 
Anthony Field, 2; Widow Arkill, 1; Gilbert Oakley, 1; Samuel 
Jenkins, 1; Joseph Knap, 1; Ezekiel Gee, 2; Thomas Sutton, 1; 
John Barton 1; Albert Surine, 1; John Still Purdy, 1; Samuel 
Crommill, 2; Isaac Hall's estate, 2; Thomas Bashford, 1; Martin 
Hazleton, 1; Abraham Craft, 1; Peter Bill, 2; Henry Post, 1; 
Caleb Hamson, 2; John Boice, 1; W^m. Lancaster, 1; Uriah 
Mitchell, 1; Peter Ricks, 2; Jeremiah Sherwood, 1; John Sher- 
wood, 1; Gabriel Archer, 2; Jonathan Wright, 2; Nathaniel 
Tompkins, 2; Hannah Knap, 5; Joseph Cromwells' estate, 2; 
Caleb Pells' farm, 2; Uriah Drake's farm, 2; Joshua Tompkins, 
2; Benjamin Odell, 1; Matthew McCaby, 1; Lewis Jones, 1; Tho. 
Woodward's farm, 1; Justus Nelson, 3; Joshua Nelson, 5; Wm. 
Yan Tassel, 1; John Meeks, 4; Joshua Lamoraux, 1; John Gar- 
rison, 1; Reuben Drake, 4; Thomas Bryant, 1; Richard Arnold, 
2; Sibert Kornkhyt, 2; Anthony Yeomans, 1; Cornelius Tomp- 
kins, 4; Micaiah Avery, 1; Tho. AVilliams, 1; Joseph Haight, 
5; Joseph Sherwood's farm, 2; Joseph Smith, 2; Peter Warren, 
2; Gilbert Bloomei', 2; John Gray, 1; Jacob Armstrong, 1; 
Oliver Odell, 1; Abraham Post, 2; John Drake, 3; Stephen 
Conklin, 2; Jedediah Ford, 1; Jeremiah McKudney, 1: Col. 
Brinkerhoffs farm, 1; Elijah Smith, 1; Silvanus Haight, -2: 
W^m. Shaw, 1; John Haight, 3; John Likely. 3; Silvanus Tomp- 
kins, 1; Thomas Hill, 1; John Agard, 1; Elijah Dinge, 1; 
Stephen Lawrence, 1; Wm. White, 1; James Jaycocks. 1; Isaac 
Odell, 2; Daniel Wilsie, 2; Nathaniel Anderson, 1; Peter Birder, 



128 iriSTOIiY OF PUTXA3[ COUNTY. 

2; Elijah Budd, 2; John Holliday, 1; Peter Montross, 1; Law- 
rence Powers, 1; Timothy Oakley, 1; Wm. Chatterton, 1; Isaac 
Washburn, 2; Henry Wilsie, 2; John Comill, 1; David Hannin, 
1; Daniel Haight, 1; Tho. Hannin, 1; Reuben Tompkins, 1; 
James Bashford, 1; Joshua Mead, 1; Andrew Doane, 1; Moses 
Dusenbury, Jr., 1; Jeremiah White, 1; Nathan Lane, 1; Mat- 
thew Snooks, 1; Nathaniel Post, 1; John Ruch, 1; Robert 
Porter, 1; Daniel Bugbee, 2; Tho. Davenport, Jr., 1; Benjamin 
Rogers, 2; John Hopper, 1; Jonathan Owens, 1; Joseph Bard, 
1; Peter Terrel, 1; James Mead, 1; Nathan Lane, Jr., 1; Elisha 
Lamoreaux, 2; Jonathan Austin, 1; Jonathan Miller, 1; Peter 
Snouck, 1; Isaac Krankhuyt, 1; James Nelson, 1; Widow Ar- 
kill, 1. 

"The foregoing list signed by the following Assessors: — 
Jonathan Dinnis, John Colkins, John G. BrinkerhoiT, Peter 
Low, Joseph Carpenter, Tho. Baldwin, Nathan Birdsall, James 
Winchell, Benjamin Sherman, John Van Kleek, Zacheus New- 
comb, David Crosby, Jr., Jabez Berry, Isaiah J. Tall man, Icha- 
bod Pain, Matthew Van Bunschoten, David Van Ness, Wm. 
Radlist. 

It is quite evident that the above assessment affords no in- 
formation as to the actual amount of property possessed by the 
persons named. The same might possibly be said of assess- 
ment rolls in more modern times, but the proportion was prob- 
ably fair. AVe might remark the great wealth of Beverly Rob- 
inson, when we comi:)are his assessment of £70 with that of 
Thomas Davenport, £15, the next highest on the list. 

The population of Putnam county in 1790 was as follows: 
Frederickstown, 5932; Philipstown, 2079; Soutlieast, 921; 
total, 8932; in 1800: Carmel, 1979; Kent, 1661; Patterson, 1506; 
Philipstown, 2754; Southeast, 1956; total, 9896; in 1810: Carmel, 
2020; Kent, 1811; Patterson, 1446; Philipstown, 3129; South- 
east, 1887; total, 10293; in 1814: Carmel, 1763; Kent, 1119; Pat- 
terson, 1557; Philipstown, 3144; Southeast, 1770; total, 9353; 
in 1820: Carmel, 2247; Kent, 1801; Patterson, 1578; Philips- 
town, 3733; Southeast, 1909; total, 11268; in 1825: Carmel, 2192; 
Kent, 1794; Patterson, 1572; Philipstown, 4418; Southeast, 
1800; total, 11866; in 1830, Carmel, 2371; Kent, 1931; Patterson, 
1539; Philipstown, 4761; Southeast, 2036; total 12638; in 1835; 
Carmel, 2163: Kent, 1661; Patterson, 1347; Philipstown, 4562; 
Southeast, ISIS; total, 11551; in 1840: Carmel, 2263; Kent, 



GENERAL HISTORY. IO9 

1830; Patterson, 1349; Philipstown, 3SU; Putnam Valley 1659 
Southeast, 1910; total, 12825; in 1845: Camel, 2389; Kent' 1799 
Patterson, 1289; Philipstown, 4209; Putnam Valley ' 1598 
Southeast, 2044; total, 13258; in 1850: Carmeh 2442; Kent 1557 
Patterson, 1371; Philipstown, 5063; Putnam Vallev ' 16^9 
Southeast, 2076; total, 14138; in 1855: Carmel, 2406; Kent ISSo' 
Patterson, 1422; Philipstown, 4809; Putnam Valley ' 1573 
Southeast, 2185; total, 13934; in 1860: Carmel, 2559; Kent 1479 
Patterson, 1501; Philipstown, 4530: Putnam Valley ' 15S''> 
Southeast. 2350; total, 14001; in 1865; Carmel, 2240;' Kent 
1473; Patterson, 1476; Philipstown, 5436; Putnam Valley, 1622 
Southeast, 259S; total, 14845; in 1875: Carmel, 2800; Kent' 141.5 
Patterson, 1523; Philipstown, 5156; Putnam v'allev, ' 1843 
Southeast, 3062; total, 15799. 



CHAPTER X. 

ROADS AND FERRIES. 

THE want of suitable roads was for long years after the set- 
tlement a great hindrance to the spread of population. 
There can be no doubt but that many of the travelled roads 
followed trails that had been made by the Indians, with all 
their devious turnings. For all purposes of trade between New 
Tork and Albany the Hudson River was the great highway, and 
a journey between those places by land was long, tedious and 
even dangerous. In 1703, the Provincial Legislature passed an 
"Act for the Laying out. Regulating, Clearing, and Preserving 
Publick Common Highways throughout the Colony." Under 
this act a public highway was established the length of Long 
Island, another on the west side of the Hudson River to Albany, 
and a third which is thus described: 

"And one other Pablick and Common General Highway, to 
extend from Kings Bridge in the County of Westchester through 
the same County of Westchester, Dutchess County and the 
"County of Albany, of the breadth of four rods English measure 
at the least, to be, continue and remain forfiver, the Publick 
Common General Road and Highway from Kings Bridge afore- 
said, to the ferry at Crawlier over against the City of Albany." 

The act went on to provide for the appointment of commis- 
sioners to perform the work, those for Dutchess county being, 
"Mr. Balthus Tan Clift, Mr. Johannes Tarbus and Mr. Robert 
Livingston." These highways being made in the reign of Queen 
Anne, were at first called the Queen's roads. But the one on 
the east side of the river was generally known in after times as 
the Albany Post road, which name it still retains. Among the 
local officei's elected in the old " South Precinct " a " Surveyor 
of the King's road," was one. 

With the exception of the Albany Post road, the first high- 



GENERAL HISTORY, 131 

ways in this county were laid oat iu 1744, by David Hustis and 
Francis Nelson, two commissioners appointed for that purpose. 
These, which are recorded in the office of the clerk of Dutchess, 
afford a clue to many early landmarks, the memory of which 
has passed away. 

'' We Francis Nelson and David Hustis being two of the com- 
missioners for laying out roads in the South Precinct have at 
the request of divers persons laid out the following highways 
as follows, viz.: 

"Beginning at Thomas Cercomes house, from thence by 
marked trees to Ephraim Forgeson's, on Cortlandt Manor. 

"Another road beginning at the farm of Eli Nelson from 
thence by marked trees to Nathan Lane's, on the line of Cort- 
landt, thence down the line to the Shrub plain. 

"Also one road beginning at the west branch of Croton river 
at a bridge, from thence by mai-ked trees down to Joseph 
Travers, then running down the division line through the still 
water' to said Forgeson's. 

" One other road beginning at the deep brook or Roge kill, 
from thence by marked trees through pussapanun=, thence to 
Daton's hills. 

"Also one other road beginning at Hendrick Brewers at pus- 
sapanun by marked trees to Daton's hills. 

"Also one other road beginning at Sibert Cronkhyt's at ye 
Indian road. Beginning at Joseph Jaycox from thence by 
marked trees to the King's road at Joseph Areles. 

"One other road beginning below pussapanun, at Joseph 
Cronkhyt's house by marked trees to Daton's mill. 

"Performed by us the said commissioners the 2Sth day of 
April, 1744." 

To locate all the landmarks in the above description would 
seem a hopeless task. "Thomas Cercomes" was probably at 
Red mills. Sibert Cronkhyt probably lived on the north bounds 
of Westchester county. 

In 1745, the commissioners were Adolph Philipse, Thomas 
Davenport and James Dickenson, and in that year they laid out 
the following roads: 

"A highway beginning at the division line between Esq. 

'The "still water" Ls south of Mahopac Falls. 

-Pussapanun was the Indian name for what is now Union Valley in the town 
of Carmel. 



132 HISTORY OF PUTXAM COU>'TT. 

Pliilipse Patent and Col. Beekman's precinct, near ye east part 
of ye precinct where ye path is now used, so by marked trees 
and stakes to Cortlandt Patent. 

"A highway from James Dicl-cerson' s by marked trees to 
Cortlandt Patent. 

"A highway from James Dickerson's by marked trees to 
Kidgefield new purchase. 

" A highway beginning at ye division of ye two counties near 
by Elihu Townsend's at a white oak tree, on ye east side of ye 
hio-hway, from thence to a white oak tree, then to Elihu Towns- 
end's fence to his corner, as ye fence now stands, then with the 
middle line of the Oblong until it meets with Danbnry highway, 
from thence by marked trees over Joes Hill, so called, until 
it meets with ye highway that comes from Wostershire', so 
called. 

" A highway beginning at ye bridge by John Dickerson's, so 
by marked trees until it comes to Crane's Mills, from thence by 
marked trees to ye bridge by Jeremiah Calkins. 

"A highway from Crane's Mills by marked trees to Ridge- 
field new purchase. 

"A highway beginning at Edward Grays, so by marked trees 
to ye Meeting house, from thence to ye west Branch of Croten 
by marked trees meeting with ye highway that has already been 
laid out near by Hamblins. 

" A highway from Shaws by marked trees to Frost mills, 
from thence to Sprages. 

"A highway from ye bridge by John Dickerson's, so by 
marked trees to the Meeting house, from thence by marked 
trees to Elijah Tompkins. 

"A highway beginning near by Taylor's, so by marked trees 
nntil it meets with ye highway that comes from ye Great Swamp 
by AVilliam Herns. 

" A highway by marked trees from Wm. Herns on ye north 
side of ye Bear swamp, so called, until it meets with Madam 
Britts line. 

" A hi"-hway by marked trees from Madam Britts line to the 
Horse pound, so called, from thence to Shaws, and from ye 
Horse pound to Croten river by marked trees. 

"A highway beginning at Joseph Lee's, by marked trees to 
Wostershire highway. 

' ■\Voicestor. 



GENERAL HISTORY. 133 

" A highway from Samuel Field's farm to ye highway that 
leads to Danbury. 

"A highway from James Dickerson's farm to ye highway 
that leads to Gortlandt line. 

•• A highway from James Paddocks to Connecticut line by 
marked trees." 

Some of the locations in the above description can be identified. 
James Dickerson lived a little south of what is known as Sodom 
Corners, in Southeast. The highway "from Col. Beekman's 
precinct to Cortlandt Patent," is the one that runs from Patter- 
son south, nearly along the west bounds of the Oblong. Elihu 
Townsend lived at the extreme southeast corner of the county. 
The "bridge by John Dickerson's " was at the Southeast Center 
or Sodom. Crane's Mills were on the Croton River north of 
"Joes Hill," three-fourths of a mile east of Sodom Corners. 
The "Meeting house" was the old log church which stood on 
the farm of James Barnes, one mile east of Dykeman's Station. 
Edward Gray lived at Doansburg, north of the church. Elihu 
Townsend lived on Lot 6, on the Oblong, close to the West- 
chester county line. The " bridge by Jeremiah Calkins " was 
at Milltown. "Harablin's" was near the j^resent residence of 
Tra Crane, west of Carmel. " Shaws " was on the north end of 
Lake Cxleneida. "Frost Mills" were probably on the Croton 
where Theodore Kelly now lives. " Sprages " was where 
Mr. Le Grand Hughson now lives, where the New^ York and 
Northern Railroad crosses the east line of the town of Carmel. 
The highway "from John Dickerson's bridge to the meeting 
house" is the road that runs north over Brewster's Hill. The 
road to Elijah Tompkins is the one that runs through " Foggin 
town"; Elijah Tompkins lived north of Doansburg. " Wm. 
Herns '' was probably where Aikin's Corners are now, being the 
east end of the road from Patterson village. The road "from 
Wm. Herns to Madam Britts line" is probably the main street 
of Patterson and its continuation. The "Horse pound road" 
is the one running through Carmel village. Samuel Field lived 
on Lot 5, on the (Oblong, near Peach Pond, and his house is still 
standing. The highway "from James Paddock's" is the road 
south of Joe's Hill. James Dickerson's house was south of the 
bridge over the Croton, at Southeast Center. 

"April ye '20th day, 1747. A highway laid out beginning at 



134 HISTORY OF PIJTXAM COUNTY. 

Abraham Smiths, by marked trees to the highway that leads 
from Kirkum Mills to ye Peekskill, four rods wide. 

"A highway laid out beginning at James Mairude's so by 
marked trees to ye highway that leads from Kirkum Mills to ye 
Peekskill, four rods wide. 

"A highway laid out beginning at a former highway near Eli 
Nelson's, so marked by trees to the former highway in Peeks- 
kill hollow four rods wide. 

"A highway laid out beginning near Mickell Shaws so by 
marked trees to the highway by Matthew Roes, from thence 
through Mr. Hill's farm to Kirkum Mills, four rods wide. 

" A highway beginning at Kirkum mills so by mai-ked trees 
to ye highway formerly laid out that leads to the Peekskill four 
rods wide. 

"A highway beginning near Benjamin Brundages so by 
marked trees to Josiah Gregory's four rods wide. 

" March 20th, 1744. A highway laid out beginning at Kirkum 
mills so by marked trees to Peekskill hollow, from thence to 
Abraham Smith's from thence to the highway that leads from 
Kirkum mills to ye Peekskill, four rods wide. 

"A highway laid out beginning at Kirkum mill by marked 
trees to ye highway east of Benjamin Brundages, four rods 
wide. 

"A highway laid out beginning at ye Peekskill road, and 
so by marked trees to Josiah Gregory's, four rods wide. 

" A highway laid out beginning at James Mored's to the 
Peekskill hollow." 

Some of these landmarks can be identified. Abraham Smith's 
was where Hon. Saxton Smith now lives in the town of Putnam 
Valley. 

" Kirkum' s mills" were where the " Red mills " afterward 
stood, on the outlet of Lake Mahopac. Michael Shaw's was on 
the north end of Lake Gleneida. " Mr. Hill's farm " was where 
the Hill Iron Mine now is. 

"Nov. 11, 1748. A highway laid out from Capt. Wright's 
saw mill, by marked trees to Peach Pond or to Westchester 
County line. 

" A highway laid out from Curhelus Fuller's by marked trees 
until it meets the road that leads from ye Long bridge to Daniel 
Gray's. 

" A highway from James Dickenson's unto Cortlandts Manor. 



GENERAL HISTORY. 135 

" A highway by marked trees beginning at Croton River near 
James Dickenson's and from thence to ye highway by Latham's 
foirr rods wide." 

" Whereas ye inhabitants of the South Precinct of Dutchess 
County did request several highways to be laid out. The said 
commissioners have laid out the several highways as follows: 

"Beginning near James Dickenson's, from thence by marked 
trees to Cortlandt Manor by Nathan Bayley's, four rods wide. 

" One more highway beginning near by where Doctor Calkins 
used to live, from thence by marked trees to ye Oblong, thence 
between Nathaniel Stevenson and Philipse Patent, to IBeekman 
precinct, four rods wide. 

"One more highway beginning near Morehouses Mill by 
marked trees to ye old highway, and ye old highway by Greenes 
house stopt up. 

"One more highway beginning by Joseph Crane thence unto 
ye highway by Samuel Jones. 

" One more highway beginning at the south end of Nathaniel 
Stevenson's land, from thence eastward between Stevenson's 
land and Joshua Barns land, four rods wide to the middle of 
the Oblong." 

" Morehonses Mill" was probably at Milltown. The road 
from " Nathaniel Stevenson's land " was probably the one that 
runs northwest from Milltown Cemetery. In 1752, a highway 
was laid out "beginning at Jonathan Lane's house and from 
thence by marked trees to EleazorYeomans Mills," and another 
" beginning at Timothy Shaws, from thence over the mountains 
to the Fishkills." The same year the following were laid out. 

" A highway from Amos Dickenson's to Jeremiah Jones, four 
rods wide. 

" A highway beginning at the Horse pound and from thence 
to Amos Fuller's four rods wide. 

" Another beginning at John Dickenson's mill from thence to 
the highway that leads to the meeting house." 

In 1754 were laid out: "A highway beginning at the bridge 
near Edward Hall's mill on the Oblong, from thence by John 
Ryder's door to a stake in said Ryder's meadow, from thence 
between James Anderson's land and said Ryder's land as far as 
is convenient for a highway to be made, from thence as near to 
Rattle snake hill as is convenient for a highway to be made, 
from thence to the highway that leads across Joes Hill. 



136 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COr>'TT. 

"Another beginning at the highway that leads to Robert 
Padricks on the top of the hill in John Jones possession, from 
thence to Jacob Finches Bridge and from . thence to James 
Quimby, and from thence to Thomas Frosts." 

Another "beginning on the west side of Qnimby farm at the 
highway from thence between John Frosts and James Qaimbys 
farms and thence to Thomas Townsends, and thence to the 
Bridge by Jeremiah Bay lees." 

Another "beginning near Nehemiah Woods at the highway, 
and from thence to Nathaniel Byington's bridge." 

Another " beginning at Tho. Higgins and from thence across 
the hills to Daley brook so called." 

Another "beginning at Anthony Battersons house from 
thence along the colony line to the highway that leads to 
Danbury." 

The road from "Timothy Shaws to Fishkill" is the road 
from Carmel to Kent Cliffs or Boyd's Reservoir. The road 
" from Horse pound to Amos Fuller's " is now called Mud road. 
"Edward Hall's mill" and "John Ryder's" were both prob- 
ably near Milltown. Thomas Higgins lived north of Milltown. 
Daley brook flows into the Croton from the east at Milltown. 

At the close of the Revolution an act was passed April 4th, 
1785, establishing a stage route to Albany. "Whereas Isaac 
Yan Wyck, Talraage Hall and John Kinne have by their peti- 
tion prayed that on Account of the great expense and labor 
attending the undertaking, an exclusive right of carrying on a 
stage from the cities of New York and Albany, might be 
o-ranted to them for the term of ten years. And whereas the 
erecting a stage as aforesaid will tend to promote the Ease and 
Benefit of the People of this State, permission is granted them 
to run stages on the east side of Hudson River." No other per- 
sons were to run stages under penalty of £200, and they were 
"to provide at least two good and. sufficient covered stage 
wagons, to be drawn each by four able horses." The fare was 
four pence a mile, including the liberty of carrying 14 pounds of 
baggage, and for every 150 pounds of baggage four pence a mile 
wal to be charged, and they were " to go at least once a week." 
A few years after the Revolution, and almost as soon as the 
country had become quiet after the toils of war, the attention 
of the State government and the people was turned to the 
necessitv of better means of communication. 



GENERAL HISTORY. 137 

Acts were passed for the improvement of certain highwaj's 
and for laying out new (3nes. A host of turnpike companies 
were incorporated and every encouragement was given to their 
enterprise. Not a few roads were opened and improved by the 
help of funds raised by lotteries. At first the stock of the 
various turnpike companies found ready purchasers and as the 
right of way cost very little and labor was cheap, excellent 
roads were made in all directions at a small expense, while the 
various laws in I'elation to working on the common highways 
soon produced a manifest improvement. 

The first turnpike laid out within the limits of Putnam county 
was by the Highland Turnpike Company. This company was 
incorporated by an act of Legislature passed March 16th, 1804. 
By its provisions William Edgar, Joseph Rowland, Philip Van 
Cortlandt, Pierre Van Cortlandt jr., William Keymees, William 
Street, Daniel Delavan, Isaac Van Wyck, Gilbert Livingston, 
Daniel C. Verplanck and Philip Verplanck and their associates 
were authorized to make " a good and sufiicient road beginning 
at or near the house of Matthew Gage in the town of Mount 
Pleasant, from thence across Croton river near the house of 
Philip Van Cortlandt, and from thence to and through the 
village of Peekskill, and from thence by the nearest and most 
eligible route, and as near the present post road as circumstances 
will admit to or near the churches in the town of Pishkill in the 
County of Dutchess." The official title was the "President, 
Directors and Company of the Highland Turnpike." The com- 
pany was authorized to take land if necessary and the commis- 
sioners who were appointed by the act were William Edgar, 
William Denning, Thomas Storm, Philip Van Cortlandt, Joseph 
Howland, Gilbert Livingston, Daniel W. Birdsall, Isaac Van 
Wyck and William Keymees. The usual powers were con- 
ferred upon the company, some of the provisions being that the 
number of toll gates should not exceed three; mile stones were 
" to be erected or placed, one for each and every mile of the 
said road, and on each stone shall be fairly and le^i-iblv marked 
the distance the said stone is from the city of Xew York" and 
a bridge was to be erected over the mouth of Croton River, to 
be furnished with a draw. 

Several years previous to tliis, an act was passed March 2Sth, 
1707, '-for opening and improving certain great roads within 
this State." This act provided tliat the sum of S45,000 should 



138 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

be raised by three lotteries and after certain other appropria- 
tions, " the residue shall be laid out in improvements on the 
jjost road leading from Croton Ferry to the County of 
Dutchess." 

The act of 1804 was repealed and a new act passed March 
25th, 1806, by which William Edgar, Joseph Rowland, Philip 
Yan Cortlandt, William Keymees, William Stut, Daniel Dela- 
van, Philip Yerplanck, Henry Garrison. Isaac Van Wyck, 
Daniel C. Yerplanck, Robert Williams, William Davies and 
Philip J. Schuyler, were incorporated to make and maintain a 
turnpike from Kings Bridge to Croton River near the house of 
Philip Yan Cortlandt and then by the most convenient route to 
Poughkeepsie. Their privileges and duties were similar to 
those of the former company. The act was amended at various 
times and the time for finishing the road extended, and persons 
living on the line of the turnpike could work out their high- 
way tax upon it if they wished. The turnpike was not a pe- 
cuniary success, and the act was repealed April 8th, 1833, the 
corporation was dissolved, and the commissioners of highways 
were required to cause the road to be kept in repair the same 
as other highways. The old mile stones which marked the dis- 
tance from New York are still remaining, and this is about 
all there is to remind the traveller of the Old Highland Tarn- 
pike. 

The next company of this county was the Westchester and 
Dutchess Turnpike Company, organized by act of March 9th, 
1810. 

This act provided that William Taber, Rowland Bailey, Jona- 
than Ferris, Pierre Yan Cortlandt, Samuel Owens, James 
Mandeville, John Oppie, James Dewey, Charles Dasenbury, 
John C. Yoght, John Jones, Nathaniel Drake, Edward 
Bugby, St. John Constant, Thomas Brown, Solomon Bundle, 
and Henry Luddington and such as should associate with 
them, " should make a good and sufficient turnpike road, to be- 
gin at the Highland Turnpike near the house of Joseph C. 
Yoght, in Cortlandt, thence to the house of James Mandeville, 
and to or near the house of Samuel Owens in said town: thence 
to the house of Jonathan Ferris and to or near the house of 
Edward Bugby and Solomon Avery in Fhilipstown. and from 
thence running up Peekskill Hollow, to the house of Rowland 



GENERAL HISTORY. 139 

Bailey', and from thence to the house of Henry Ludino-ton^ in 
the town of Frederick, and then to the great road west olQua'ker 
Hi]]." 

The capital stock was 1,500 shares of 82o each, the distance 
was twenty-four miles, and there were to be two toll o^ates on 
the road. This turnpike through Peekskill Hollow followed 
the old road which was in use long before the Revolution and 
plainly marked on Erskine's map. In 1816, the time, for rhe 
completion of the road was extended to 1821, and by an act of 
1820 they were authorized to extend the road "from where it 
now intersects the Philipstown Turnpike near the house of Wm 
Knapp, across the Fishkill Mountains." 

The Philipstown Turnpike Comi^any was incorporated bv an 
act passed April 14th, 1815. By this act, Samuel Gouverneur, 
Amos Belden, David Knapp, Samuel Townsend, John Haight 
and others were incorporated as a company, "for the purpose 
of making a good and sufBcient road from Cold Spring landing, 
in the town of Philipstown, and running from thence' the most 
direct and common route, in a northeasterly direction, by way 
of the ore bed, Milltown', Abel Peak's tavern*, and Joseph 
White's tavern, to the meeting house in the town of Patterson, 
according to the survey thereof made by Zebulon Horner, Jr ' 
March 28th, 1814, and extending to the Connecticut line so as 
to promote the interest of the Public'." 

The capital stock of this company was to be 1,000 shares at $30 
each. This turnpike ran from Farmer's Mills, on the west side 
of White Pond and up into Dutchess county, and making a 
turn came back into Putnam county on the west side of the rnill 
pond at Ludingtouville. It ran through the village of Patter- 
son, and thence northeast up the hill and so to the°Connecticut 
line. In 1829, the company was authorized to abandon "so 
much of their road as lies between the line of Fishkill near Peter 
Rites, and the town of Patterson, at Benjamin Pugslev's." In 
1834, they were authorized "to abandon so much of the road as 
lies between Haviland's Corners, in the town of Patterson and 
its intersection with the Connecticut line in the town of Paw- 

'The present residence of Mr. Stephens, at Bovd's Corners, formerly Dr. Mat- 
thew Bailey's. 

-At Ludingt(jnville in Kent. 

^Farmer's Mills. 

••This was in Dutchess county at what is called "Peck Slip." 

=The first 12 miles were built by Dr. Edward Parks, for >il2 000 



140 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

lings." In 1857, an act was passed providing " that when the 
persons holding a majority of the stock of the company, should 
have transferred their shares to the towns in which the road 
lies, that then such parts of the turnpike shall be a public road 
and worked as other roads." The whole road was finally aban- 
doned by the company, but as a large portion of it west of 
Farmers Mills went through a thinly settled region, there was 
not enough taxable property to keep it in repair. In 1879, the 
board of supervisors was authorized to appoint three commis- 
sioners to keep the road in proper condition. From that time 
the highway has been kept in repair by the commissioners thus 
appointed and the sum of S.WO has annually been expended for 
that purpose, and it is generally known as the "Putnam 
County road." Previous to this, in 1862, an act was passed by 
which the county jndge was authorized to appoint three com- 
missioners to manage the road. A part of this act provided 
that no person should carry a load of more than 4,000 pounds on 
vehicles with wheels less than five inches wide, the roads having 
been much injured by heavy loads of ore from the mines 
on the route. In 1875 a law which is still in force was made 
providing that $500 annually should be raised for keeping the 
road in repair. 

An effort to improve one of the most important roads in the 
county was made in 1836, when an act was passed by which 
James Towner and William Watts, of Putnam, and James 
Turk, of Westchester, were appointed commissioners "to alter 
the road from Frederick Luddington's by way of the Court 
House, to Croton Turnpike, for .the purpose of shortening and 
improving the same." This road, which is one of the oldest in 
the county, has been known from the earliest time as the 
"Horse Pound road." It was once the principal route between 
Westchester and Dutchess counties, and is mentioned by the 
same name in 1756. It ran the width of the county from the 
Dutchess line at Ludingtouville, to Carmel; and by the Court 
House it ran south, running to the west of the present road 
opposite the seminary and extended south to where the road 
turns east that goes to the Gilead burying ground. It followed 
that road as far as the burying ground, and from that ran south- 
east (where the telegraph poles now stand and where the line 
of the old road is yet plainly visible) to the road that runs 
south past the " AVatts farm," called the Croton Falls road. 



CrJKXERAL HISTORY. 141 

The portion of the road between the burying ground and the 
\Yatts pkice was discontinued after the making of the "new 
road" running east from Carmel, by the Presbyterian church. 

The same year Edward Smith, of Carmel, Hart Weed, of 
Southeast, and Reuben R. Finch, of Cortlandt, were appointed 
"to lay out a road from Peekskill to the store of James 
Towner', -in Patterson." They were authorized " to lay out the 
road not less than three rods wide, by the Court House in 
Carmel, to the store of James Towner, on the most eligible and 
direct route, or to alter the road now in use and to discontinue 
such parts as they deem unnecessary." The commissioners 
were to have $2 per day for service. This road was from Peeks- 
kill by way of the " Red Mills", and was made a very excel- 
lent road. 

The act was amended in 1744, and Ray Tompkins, of Somers, 
John Crawford, of Southeast, and Silas Slawson, of Carmel, 
were appointed to lay out the highway not less than three rods 
wide from the house of James Towner, by the Court House in 
Carmel, to "The house of Gilbert Knapp, near the head of 
Peekskill Turnpike, in Yorktown," and in case the turnpike 
should be free, they were to lay out a free road three rods wide. 
These roads were of great importance, as leading to the only 
convenient port on the Hudson River. 

The "Croton Turnpike" was made under an act passed 
April Sth, 1811, by which Stephen Barnum, Samuel Haviland, 
Benjamin Cowls and Abijah Seeley and their associates were 
authorized " to make a good and sufficient road from the north 
end of the Croton Turnpike near the house of widow Deborah 
Sears, in the town of Southeast, and running thence the most 
direct route to the house of Abijah Seeley, in the town of Pat- 
terson and thence by the most direct route to the bridge across 
Croton River about one half mile west of Capt. Benjamin Cowls, 
thence eastwardly to the Connecticut line, terminating at the 
dwelling house of Timothy Haviland, in said town of Pat- 
terson." 

This is the road that runs through Haviland Hollow. Abijah 
Seeley lived where his son, Dr. Jonathan Seelej-, now lives, 
about a mile north of Doansburg. The old Croton Turnpike 
ran from the Westchester line near Croton Falls, to the present 

'This was at the four corners, near the Baptist church, now the residence of 
Philip D. Penney. 



142 HISTORT OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

site of the Borden Condensed Milk Factory, near Brewster, 
and thence on to Southeast Center, and thence to Doansburg 
where it terminated on the west side of the burying ground. 
The above described road is its continuation to Cowls' Corners 
and Haviland Hollow. 

The Putnam and Dutchess Turnpike Company was incor- 
porated by an act of the Legislature passed April 11 th,*1827, by 
which act Edward Smith, Alvin Chase, Herman R., Stephen 
and Elizer Baldwin, and such persons as should associate with 
.them, were incorporated to build " a good and sufficient turn- 
pike road, to commence at a point on the Croton Turnpike in 
the town of Somers in Westchester Co., between the house of 
Isaac Brown and the bridge over the east branch of Croton 
River, a few rods northeast of the mill of John Owen, to run 
from thence the most eligible route through the County of Put- 
nam, to, or near, the house occupied by Sylvanus Merritt, in 
the town of Pawlings. in the County of Dutchess, passing on 
this route on the west side of the Court House in the town of 
Carmel, Putnam Co., and near the house of Edward Smith, in 
the town of Kent, and near the house of Sewell White in the 
town of Pawlings." 

The stock was to be $10,000, in shares of $20 each, and as soon 
as any five miles of the road should be finished, they were 
authorized to erect gates, but not within one mile of the Court 
House. Jonathan Morehouse, Benjamin Isaacs and Wheeler 
Gilbert were appointed commissioners to lay out the road and 
were authorized to appropriate any land then used as a road. 

'The end of all these turnpike companies was the same. They 
proved unprofitable and the cost of maintaining toll gates and 
keeping the road in repair exceeded, or at least equaled, the 
income. They were gradually abandoned, and became common 
highways, but Putnam county is indebted to these early cor- 
porations for its best roads, and the traveller may well call to 
mind the names of their founders and bless their memory. 

'• AVe hear no more of the clanging hoof, 

And the stage-coach rattling by ; 
For the steam-king rules the travelled world, 

And the old pike's left to die. 
The grass creeps o'er the flinty path, 

And the stealthy daisies steal. 
Where once the stage-horse, day by day, 

Lifted his iron heel. 



GENEIIAL HISTORY. 143 

" Xo more the weary stager dreads 
The toil of the coming morn ; 
No more the bustling landlord runs 

At the sound of the echoing horn ; 
For the dust lies still upon the road, 

And the bright-eyed children play 
Where once the clattering hoof and wheel, 
Rattled along the way." 

Rev. John Pierpont. 

Previous to the Revolution there was but little need of a 
regularly established ferry across the river from any portion of 
this county, the population being small and the occasions for 
crossing being few. It was not till the war began that the im- 
portance of West Point as a military post became apparent. 
Up to 1795, the power of licensing ferries to carry passengers 
for hire, was vested in the Courts of Common Pleas, which 
granted the license and prescribed the rates of fare. 

" An Act for establishing and regulating a ferry across the 
iS'orth River, in the town of Philips, in the County of Putnam, 
March 16th, 1821. 

" That it shall and may be lawful for Harry Garrison of the 
town of Philips, his heirs and assigns to set up and keep and 
maintain a ferry across the North River, to any convenient place 
on the west shore of the said river in the County of Orano-e 
for and during the term of twelve years from and after the pas- 
sage of this act." 

By an act passed April 12th, 1S30, it was granted to John 
Garrison of the town of Philips, and his heirs and assigns, to 
set up and keep a ferry across the river, from the land of said ' 
Garrison, between the north point of Constitution Island and 
the north point of Conshook Island to any convenient place on 
the west side of the river in the County of Orange, for the period 
of ten years from the 16th day of May, 1833. In 1843, this privi- 
lege was extended to twelve years. In 1833, the followino' rates 
of ferriage were established by the County Court: 

''For carrying every wagon with 2 horses, 81. 2o; for carr vino- 
every wagon with 1 horse, 75c. ; for single horse, 5()c. ; each head 
of cattle, 37ic. ; hog, sheep oi- calf, 6c.; wagon, sulky or chaise, 
50c; single passenger, ISc. ; barrel of pork or beef, 12i-c." 

These rates might be doubled after the first of December, 
until the succeeding March, between the hours of S p. si. and 
sunrise. 



144 HISTORY OF l-JTXAM COUNTT. 

In 1826, an act was passed autliorizing Thomas Ketcham and 
Samuel Gouverneur to keep a ferry across the Hudson River 
from Putrock Landing, in Orange county, to Cold Spring 
Landing. 

In 1S50, Edward Hubbard, Christopher D. Miller and Thomas 
J. De Lancy were empowered to run a ferry from Cornwall to 
Cold Spring for the term of ten years. 

In 1851, Henry R. Purdy was empowered to keep a ferry 
'• from Cold Spring Landing between the north point of Con- 
stitution Island, and the south part of Stony Point, to some 
convenient place on the opposite shore," for the term of twelve 
years. 

In 1863, a grant of land under water was made to the Garri- 
son and West Point Ferry Company, the same being contiguous 
to their property. 

The present Garrison and West Point Ferry Company, organ- 
ized under a law of 1853, consists of Henry W. Belcher, 
Henry E. Belcher, George E. Belcher, Charles D. Hoffman, 
Ethan D. Griswold and Frank D. Griswold. The capital stock 
is 825,000, and the company owns real estate and boats to the 
amount of $53,000. 



146 IIISTOKY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

the respective Precincts thereof to assemble and meet at the 
most convenient place, as the Justices or any two of them shall 
appoint, at any time before the first Tuesday in September next, 
there to make choice of one Freeholder to be Supervisor, one 
Treasurer, two Assessors and two Collectors, in the said County, 
wHo shall have the same Power, Authority, Office and Function, 
and do, perform, execute and serve, and be liable to the same 
Pains and Penalties, as the Supervisors, Treasurers, Assessors 
and Collectors of the several and respective Counties within this 
Colony until the first Tuesday in April next ensuing, and then 
one Supervisor, one Treasurer, and so many Assessors and 
Collectors to be chosen and elected annually." 

In accordance with the provisions of this act, the officers men- 
tioned were elected annually, but no document in existence 
gives their names or tells of their acts; and the next informatin 
to be found is contained in an act passed in 1719, entitled, " An 
Act to elect Supervisors in Dutchess County." " Whereas by 
an Act made in the Twelfth year of the reign of the late Queen 
Anne, Entitled: 

" An Act for Dutchess County to elect a Supervisor, a Trea- 
surer, Assessors and Collectors, the County since being increased 
in Inhabitants and Settlements made, Now for the more ease 
and better defraying the public Charge of the said County. Be 
it therefore enacted by the Governor, Council and General 
Assembly, and it is hereby Enacted by the authority of the 
same. That from and after the Publication of this Act, the said 
Coxinty shall be divided into three Divisions. The South 
Division to begin at the South side of the Highlands, and ex- 
tend to Wappingers creek, the Middle Division to begin at the 
aforesaid Wappingers creek and so northward to the Kline 
Sopus Island, and the North Division to begin on the North 
side of the middle Division and ending on the northmost Bounds 
and extent of the County. 

" And for the better advantage and more easie adjusting the 
Accounts of Taxes in the said County, and payment of the 
County charge, Be it enacted by the authority aforesaid, That 
the Inhabitants of every respective Division are herebj' required 
and Authorized, yearly and every year upon the publick Elec- 
tion, being the first Tuesday in April, to elect and appoint in 
every Division a Supervisor for the said County who shall have 
the same power, Function and Authority to raise Publick 



148 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

King's Highway; Jan Buys, Surveyor of ye roads about ye 
Fishkill; Daniel Bush, Surveyor of ye roads about Pough- 
quaick'; Peter Du Bois and Jan Buys, Surveyors of fences; 
Jan Buys, Pounner (Pounder). 

"Agreed by a majority of votes that all fences shall be in 
height from ye ground upward to ye uppermost part of ye top 
rail or log or Ryder, 4 foot, 4 inches, English measure. Also 
agreed that ye Hogs in ye said Ward has priviledge to run from 
ye 1st day of Oct. till ye month of April." 

A curious example of county expenses, in the early part of 
the last century, is the following account of bills allowed by 
the Supervisors in 1724: 

" Dutchess County AnnoDom. 1724, February the 2nd day." 
"At a meeting of Supervisors at Poughkeepsie to adeciate 
the debts and arrearages of ye said Co. we have proceeded and 
allowed to the persons hereafter named the following accounts 
viz: 
"To Col. Leonard Lewis to service in Gen. Assembly, 

63 days, Sertificate date ye 14 July An. 1724. . . £18,lSs. 
"Ordered that 20s. be given to the Clerk Mr. Henry 
Van Der Burg for to purchase a book of the Laws 
of the Province for the use of the County, . . 1,00 
"Ordered that the Clerk shall have £4 for his years 

salary which was expired the 15th of last Oct. past, 4,00 
" To Harmanus Ryder for his Salary, .... ,30s. 
" To Leonard Lewis Esq. for Beer and Rum for ye As- 
sessors and Supervisors, ,12s. 

" To Mr. Jacobus- Van Den Bogart for victualing the 

Supervisors and Assessors, ,09s. 

" To Mr. Traphagen for service upon the Kings High- 
road which was never afore brought in, for two 

days at 6s. per day, ,12s. 

"To Col. Leonard Lewis for 6s. disbursed for the Co. 
to Harmanus Rynders, as Cryer in ye Circuit Court 
several years agoe, . ,6s. 

£27, 07s. 
"Barext Van Wagxer, 
"Jacobus Swartwout, 
"Jacobus Van den Bogart." 

'Now the town of Beekman. 



GENERAL HISTORY. 149 

Taxes were small in those days as may be seen by the fol- 
lowing receipt: 

"New York IS June 1724, Received from John Montross 
Collector of the South Ward of Dutchess Co. by the hands of 
LeonartJ Lewis Esq. the sum of 5 pounds 6 shillings and 8 
pence, being on the acct. for Raising the Quantity of Three 
thousand ounces of plate for the effectual sinking and cancel- 
ling bills of credit to that value. 

' ' I say received by me. 

"£5, 6s. Sd. 

"A. D. Petster, Jr." 

As the Dutch language was used by a large portion of the 
inhabitants of the county at that time, receipts are occasionally 
found given in that language : 
" Dutsers Co. 1726 July 17. 

" Ontsange von Mr. Welliam Lossen de som von twelf pont 
en elf Segillings en een penny, Bynde en vol voor Syn tax lyst 
by myn 

LowwEKENS Van Cleek 

Treasurer." 

Supervisors of the South Ward of Dutchess county: Jacobus 
Swartwout, 1722-24; James Hussy, 1725; Peter Du Bois, 1726; 
Jacobus Swartwout, 1727; Abraham Brinkerhoff, 1728; Jacobus 
De Peyster, 1729-31; James Hussy, 1732. 

The comparative wealth of these three wards may be seen 
from the following amounts of tax paid in the year 172.5: North 
Ward, £53, 15s., 3d.; Middle Ward, £36, 9s., 3M.; South 
Ward, £27, 9s., IM. 

The next change in political divisions was December 16th, 
1737, when the following was passed: 

''An Act to divide Dutchess County into Precincts. 

" W^hereas Dutchess County by an Act made in the 5th year 
of his late Majesty's reign', entitled ' an Act to elect Super- 
visors in Dutchess County,' was divided into three Divisions, 
and Avhereas since that time the Number of Inhabitants is much 
increased and many new settlements have been made, whereb}^ 
it is become necessary for the Ease and Convenience of the 

' As Acts of Parliament and deeds for land in colonial times are dated from the 
year of the beginning of the Sovereign's reign the following may be of value as 
reference: William and Mary began to reign in 16S9: Queen Anne in 1702; 
George I. in 1715: George II. in 1728. 



150 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

Inhabitants thereof that the said County should be divided into 
more Precincts. 

"Be it therefore enacted by the Lieut. Governor, the Council 
and the General Assembly, and it is hereby enacted by the 
Authority of the same. That from and after the Publication 
of this Act, the said County shall be divided into seven Pre- 
cincts in the following manner : 

" The south Precinct to contain all that part of the Highlands 
which is granted by Patent to Adolph Philipse Esq. 

" The Rumbout or Fishkill Precinct to contain all that part 
of Rumboat Patent South of Wappinger's Creek. 

"The Beekmen Precinct to contain all that land granted to 
Henry Beekman Esq." 

The act goes on to establish the precincts of Crom Elbow, 
Rhynbeck and Northeast. 

It will be seen from the above that the South Precinct em- 
braced all the present county of Putnam and also the south- 
western portions of the town of Fishkill in Dutchess. 

The loss of many of the early records renders it impossible to 
give a complete list of the officers of the South Precinct, and 
we can only give the names of the officers from 1754. 

Supervisors : Samuel Field, 1754-56; Petrus Dubois, 1757; 
Philip Philipse, of New York, 1760-62; Beverly Robinson, 
1763_6o; Philip Philipse, 1766-69; Tertullus Dickenson, 
1770-71. 

Assessors : James Dickenson, Joseph Lane, 1754; James 
Dickenson, William Nelson, 1755-56; Joseph Lane, Daniel 
Townsend, 1757; Valentine Perkins, Joseph Lane, 1758; Daniel 
Townsend, Joseph Lane, 1759; James Dickenson, George 
Hughson, 1760; James Dickenson, George Hiighson, 1761-2-3-4-5; 
Josejjh Lane, Edward Gray, 1766; Malcolm Morrison, Tertullus 
Dickenson, 1767-8-9; Roswell Wilcox, Samuel Peters Esq., 
1770; William Penny, James Dickenson jr., 1771. 

Clerks: Schuman Travis, 1761; Samuel Dickenson, 1768; 
Edward Rice, 17G6; Eleazar Baker, 176'7. 

Constables in 1754 : Israel Taylor, Nathan Taylor, Uriah 
Hill, Thomas Philipse. 

The first overseers of the poor were George Hughson, Edward 
Gray, Peter Drake and Nathaniel Porter, 1762. In this year 
there was a great addition made to the number of precinct 
officers, there being elected, six "Poiinders," four fence viewers. 



GENERAL HISTORY. 151 

and forty eight ixithmasters. In 1763, a new officer makes his 
api:)earance, in the person of Jacob Parrish, "Whipper.'' 
Whether the precinct ceased to have any need for the services 
of this officer, or whether no one cared to fill the position, is 
unknown to the writer, but he seems to have been the first and 
the last elected to that office. 

For several years before the Revolution, the population of 
the South Precinct increased with rapidit}', especially the eastern 
portion, and on the 24th of March, 1772, the following was 
passed: 

"An Act for dividing the South Precinct of the County of 
Dutchess into three Precincts. 

"Whereas the South Precinct in the County of Dutchess is 
so extensive that many of the inhabitants cannot attend the 
annual meeting for Election of officers, without great incon- 
venience, and is become so populous that the Elections can no 
longer be held with due Order and Regularity. 

" I. Be it enacted by his Excellency the Governor the Coun- 
cil and the General Assembly, and it is hereby enacted by the 
Authority of the Same. That the said South Precinct shall 
after the first day of April next be divided into three Precincts 
in the Manner following: 

" The west Division or Precinct is to be called Philips Pre- 
cinct, bounded as follows, to wit, Southerly by Westchester 
County, Easterly by East line of Beverly Robinson's Long Lot 
No. 4; Northerly by the Division line bet\veen Rumbout and 
Philipse Patents, and Westerly by Hudson's river. And the 
Middle Division or Precinct to comprehend that part of Philipse 
Patent, within the said South Precinct known by the name of 
the three east short Lots and the two eastern Long Lots, to be 
called Fredricksburg and bounded as follows, to wit. Southerly 
by Westchester County, Northerly by Pawlings Precinct, East- 
erly by the Oblong and Westerly by Philipse Precinct. The 
Eastermost Division or Precinct to comprehend the lands called 
the Oblong lying within the said South Precinct, to be called 
the South East Precinct, and bounded as follows, to wit. South- 
erly by Westchester County, Westerly by Fredricksburg Pre- 
cinct, Northerly by Pawlings Precinct, until it comes to the 
Connecticut line, Easterly by the Connecticut line. Li which 
said three Precincts tliere shall be annually chosen by the ma- 
jority of voices of the Freeholders and Inhabitants, in each re- 



152 niSTORV OF PUTXAM COUNTY. 

spective Precinct, One Clerk, one Supervisor, two Assessors, one 
Collector, two Constables, three Overseers of Poor, three fence 
viewers, two Pound Masters and Overseers of Highways or as 
many Pound Masters and Overseers of Highways as the 
majority of the Inhabitants at their said annual meeting shall 
think fit. Which said officers so elected shall each and every 
of them have the same Power and Authority thar any of the 
like officers have in any other of the Precincts, in the said 
County, and shall be liable to the same Pains and Penalties, 
any thing in this or any other Act, to the contrary notwith- 
standing. 

"II. And be it enacted by the Authority aforesaid, That the 
Justices and Overseers of the Poor shall as soon as possible after 
the Division of the said Precincts, call together all the Poor of 
the said Precincts and make an equal Distribution of them as 
is possible in the said Precincts, to be for the future maintained 
by, and reside in the Precinct they shall be allotted to: and that 
all such sum or sums of money that shall or may be due by the 
said Precinct at the Division thereof, for the Maintainance of 
the Poor shall be levied proportionally on each of the resj^ec- 
tive Precincts at the next meeting of the Supervisors and 
Assessors. 

"III. And be it enacted, That the Inhabitants of Fredericks- 
burg Precinct shall annually meet on the first Tuesday of April, 
for the election of officers for said Precinct, at the house of 
Thomas Smith in Fredricksburg; and that Ihe Inhabitants of 
Philijjse Precinct shall meet on the same day, for the like pur- 
pose at the house of John Compton in Philipse Precinct: and 
that the Inhabitants of the South East Precinct shall meet on 
the same day for the like purjiose at tlie dwelling of John Ryder, 
in the said Precinct. 

" lY. And be it enacted, That it shall and may be lawful for 
the Inhabitants of each of the aforesaid Precincts, at any of 
tlieir annual meetings for electing officers as aforesaid, by a ma- 
jority of voices of the Inhabitants so met, to appoint any other 
certain place for the next election: which shall continue to be 
the i:)lace of Election till another ap2:)ointment be made in the 
same manner. 

"V. And be it enacted by the Anihority aforesaid that the 
Inhabitants of Philipse and Fredricksburg Precincts having 
l^ersonal estate to the value of sixty pounds, free from all in- 



GENERAL IIISTOUY. 153 

cumbrance, shall bp, and hereby are made liable to serve as jur- 
ors, on the trial of Cases in Justices Courts in the said Precincts 
of Philipse and Fredricksburg anything in the aforesaid Act to 
the Contrary notwithstanding." 

The records of these precincts are very scanty, and almost 
the only thing remaining is the book of accounts kept by the 
overseers of the poor, which has lately been found and placed 
in the county clerk's office. As this contains the only account 
of any official proceedings in the days before the Revolution, a 
few extracts may be of interest. They carry us back to a time 
when the population was small, and life in its primitive sim- 
plicity; to days when each family was supported by its own 
labor, when the rocky farm supplied the few wants of its owner, 
and when the "homespun" clotlied the entire community. 

" Dec. the 27th, 1768. Personally appeared before us James 
Dickenson Samuel Peters and John Ryder Esqsrs. Justices of 
the Peace for the County of Dutchess, Tertullus Dickenson 
Malcom Morrison and Peter Drake, poor masters of the South 
Precinct of s^l County, and paid out under our Inspector all the 
money that they have received for the use of the poor for two 
years past, which was the sum of two hundred and fifty eight 
Pounds. 

"James Dickenson, 
" Samuel Peters, 
"John Ryder." 

On the 7th of May, 1770, we lind the following: 

" The Poor of the South Precinct are this day put out as doth 
appear under written, until 7tli of May, 1771. Allowed to Jere- 
miah Burgess for keeping David Aiistin, £12; allowed to Mrs. 
Sileven for keeping her husband, 8,19; allowed to John Rhodes 
for keeping his sister, 5,00; allowed John Brewer for keei)ing 
Martha Mead, 8,18; allowed Elijah Colkins keeping Joseph 
Barber's daughter, 11,18; allowed to pay the rent of Gideon 
Ellis' farm the ensueing year, 2,00; and also the rent of James 
Brown's farm, 2,00; allowed to Francis Baker for taking 
<;are of a poor child to date, 2,10; allowed to John Ryder Esq. 
for taking care and keeping Abigail and Levina Discoml), 
twenty tJiree pounds and he promises to save the Precinct 
harmless, from any further charge that may happen by said 
children until they arrive to the age of eighteen years. The said 
cliHdren are allowed to be three vears old. 



154 HISTORY OF PUTXAM COU.XTY. 

" Whereas Mary Golden and her three children were lately 
Removed by an order of Thos. Menzies and Malcom Morrison 
to the Manor of Philipsburg from the South Precinct and 
whereas the said Mary Golden and her children are sent back 
by order of two Justices of Westchester County. Resolved 
that advice shall be taken, and the order of the said Justices of 
Westchester County be disputed, and that the three Precincts 
of Fredericksburg, South East and Philipse shall bear their 
proportionable expense, and that Thos. Menzies shall apply to 
the King's Attorney, for his advice, and do whatever is neces- 
sary in consequence of his advice. The children to continue 
where they are until the matter is decided, May 7th, 1772." 

At the time when the South Precinct was divided into the 
three Precincts of Fredericksburg, Philipse and South East, the 
following division of the poor was made: 

•'It is this day agreed by the Justices and Overseers of the 
Poor, that the Poor of the late South Precinct be, from and 
after this day maintained and provided for in the following 
manner, to wit, The South East Precinct to take William Gray 
and his wife, Fredericksburg Precinct paying to the South East 
Precinct five pounds yearly, as long as said Wm. Gray and wife 
shall live. 

"Fredericksburg Precinct to take David Ashton, John 
Sullivan, Martha Mead, Joseph Barber, the children of Gilbert 
Clapp, Rachel Hughs, John Carr and Samuel Goodspeed. 

" Philipse Precinct to take the widow Farrington and John 
Rhodes' sister. If any mistake or omission hereafter appear it 
is hereby agreed that all Errors shall be Rectified. John Duff's 
children to be removed, the charges of removal and whatever 
charges may accrue from said removal to be proportionately de- 
frayed by the said three Precincts." 

The Bible says, "The poor ye have always with you," but it 
would seem by the above list that Putnam county, as it then 
was, had very few of that class. The certificate attached to the 
foregoing arrangement is given mfac simile. It is in the hand- 
writing of Beverly Robinson, doubtless the most prominent man 
of the precinct in those days. 

"Oct. 12th, 1773. Agreed with Samuel Peters, Esq., that he 
is to build a log house twenty five feet lung, and IS feet wide, 
with a stone chimney at each end, and the s'i house is to be 









(^^>^X^/^ 



t/y 



^/rn^d?r^ 










GENERAL HISTORY. 155 

finished the 16th. day of May next & s^ Peters is to have Thirty 
Pounds for building said house." 

The following account shows the prices of things in 1775: 

"Samuel Peters, Esq. for supj^lying the poor House with 
grain a year ending this day viz. May 6th, 1775: 14i bushels 
Corn at 3s. 6d., £2,10,9; 11 bushels Rye at 4s., 2,04,0; 21 
bushels wheat at 6s., 0,15,0; 2U lbs. veal at 3d., 0,05,4^; a bed- 
stead, 0,04,4; 1 cwt. Pork, 1,10,0. Total, £7,09,5^." 

In 177S, the following prices were current: Pork per lb., 4d. ; 
Bacon per lb.. 8d.; Mutton, 3d.; Beef, 3d.; Salt per bushel, 
16s. ; Tow cloth per yard, Is. 5d. ; Candles per lb, 4d. 

The issue of Continental money caused an inflation of prices, 
as in more modern times. 1778, Dec. 22d. Allowed to : " Elihu 
Secord for one barrel Sope, £12; to 6 lbs. candles, 2,08; two 
bushel of corn, 2,08; 25 lbs. salt pork, 5; to four bushels of 
Turnips, 1,12; To four bushels of Tators (potatoes), 2,08; mak- 
ing up clothing, 7,12; one pair of shoes, 1,4; to keeping Sarah 
Adkins one week, finding her victuals, 1,04." 

A yoke of oxen sold to Elihu Secor were valued at £80. The 
rapid changes in prices were arranged for as in the following, 
and thus marks the depreciation of Continental money: 

"Dec. 24th, 1778. To Esq. Peters for 105 lbs. Pork, £1,17,8. 
The price of the above Article is to be paid what is current for 
said article when said Peters receives his money." 

"April 27th, 1779, 1 bushel of wheat, £3,04." 

"Allowed to Joseph Teed April 3, 1779 for the use of one 
cow, 16. To 16i bushels of wheat, 12 bushels of Rye and 2 
bushels of corn, 155,08. Price of said grain to be paid what is 
current when said Teed receives his money." 

"May 7 1779 To a cow, £100." 

"May 13 1779 The Precinct Dr. to Elijah Townsend, £100. 
The above account was settled when money was eight to one, 
which is to be paid at that rate." 

OFFICERS OF THE PRECINCTS. 

The following officers were elected (after the formation of the 
Precincts in 17721 for Philipse Precinct and Fredericksburg. 
The officers elected for the South East Precinct do not appear 
for that year on the Records in Poughkeepsie. 

Philipse Precinct : Supervisor, Beverly Robinson; assessors, 
Caleb Nelson, Joseph Lane; collector. William Dnsenbury; 



156 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

constables, Israel Taylor, Isaac Davenport: poor masters, 
Justus Nelson. Cornelius Tompkins. Fredericksburg: Super- 
visor, Tertullus Dickenson; assessors, Henry Luddington, 
Jam-es Dickenson; collector, Edward Rice; constables, Wm. 
Underbill, Wm. Nelson, Elijah Townsend, Edward Rice; poor 
masters, Jehiel Bazely, James Dickenson. 

The first election of commissioners of highways was in 1773, 
when the following were chosen: Philipse Precinct: Justus 
Nelson, Moses Dusenbury, Isaac Rhodes; Fredericksburg: 
James Dickenson, Jehiel Beardsley, James Dickenson, Jr.; 
South East: Thomas Baldwin, Owen Hull, Seth Nickerson. 

Pound masters first appeared in 1774, when we find the fol- 
lowing occupants of that important ofiice: Cornelius Tompkins, 
John Oakley, Joseph Haight, Caleb Nelson. 

Supervisors of Philipse Precinct: Moses Dusenbury, 1773; 
Beverly Robinson, 1774; Joshua Nelson, 1775; George Lane, 
1786; John Hyatt, 1787. Of Fredericksburg, Tertullus Dick- 
enson, 1773-76; Henry Luddington, 1777, 1778; Reuben Ferris, 
1779-84; John Drake, 1786; Reuben Ferris, 1787. Of South 
East: Joseph Crane, jr., 1773; John Field, 1774-76; Joseph 
Crane, 1778; William Mott, 1779, 1780; Isaac Crosby, 1782-84; 
Joseph Crane, 1787. 

Assessors of Philipse Precinct: Joseph Lane, 1772; William 
Dusenbury, Caleb Nelson, 1773; Joshua Nelson, William Dusen- 
bury, 1774; Cornelius Tompkins, Joshua Nelson, 1775; J^hn 
Armstrong, Morris Smith, Titus Travis, Joshua Horton, Isaac 
Davenport, 1786. Of Fredericksburg: Henry Luddington, 
James Dickenson, 1772; Jabez Berry, William Penney, 1773; 
Jabez Berry, David Crosby, 1774-76; Roswell Wilcox, Reuben 
Crosby, 1778; Alexander Kidd, Jonathan Paddock, Heman 
King, Elijah Townsend, Elisha Cole, James Wilson. Jabez Berry, 
1779; David Hecock, Nehemiah Jones, Moody Howes, Ebenezer 
Robinson, Elijah Townsend, Solomon Hopkins, Jabez Berry, 
1780; David Hecock, Stephen Field, Jabez Berry, 1782; Roswell 
Wilcox, "William Penney, Timothy Delavan, David Cole, 
Elijah Townsend, John Berry, 1783; Roswell Wilcox, 
"William Penney, Moody Howes, Solomon Hopkins. Elijah 
Townsend, John Berry, 1784; Jabez Berry, David Crosby, 
jr., Roswell Wilcox, 1786. Of South East: John Field, Samuel 
Berry, 1773; Robert Hall, James Birdsall, 1774: Peter Hall, 
Daniel Haviland, 1775; William Mott, Nathan Birdsall. 1776, 



GENERAL HISTORY. 157 

William Mott, Thomas Baldwin, Nathan Birdsall, 1778; Thomas 
Baldwin, Simeon Ryder, 1779; Thomas Baldwin, Thomas Hig- 
gins, Xathan Birdsall, 1782; Thomas Baldwin, Thomas Higgins, 
John Elwell, 1783; Thomas Baldwin, Joseph Crane, jr., John 
Elwell, 17S4; Joseph Crosby, jr., Thomas Higgins, Nathan Pad- 
dock, 1785; Thomas Baldwin, John Hopkins, Thomas Higgins, 
1786. 

FORMATION OF TOWNS. 

After the Revolntion and upon the adoption of the State Con- 
stitution, an act was passed for dividing the State into counties. 
This act established Dutchess county according to its ancient 
boundaries except as to its northern limits, which extended 
only to the south bounds of the Manor of Livingston. March 
7th, 1780, an act was also passed for dividing the counties of the 
State into towns, in which are the following provisions: 

"And all that part of the County of Dutchess, bounded 
Southerly by the County of Westchester, Westerly by Hud- 
son's river. Northerly by the north Bounds of the lands granted 
to Adolph Philipse Esq., and Easterly by the East bounds of the 
Long Lot No. 4, formerly belonging to Beverly Robinson: shall 
be, and hereby is erected into a Town by the name of Philips- 
town." 

"And all that part of the said County of Dutchess, bounded 
Southerly by the County of Westchester, Westeiij' by Philii^s- 
town, Northerly by the north bounds of the lands granted to 
Adolph Philipse Esq., and Easterly by the East bounds of the 
same Patent: shall be, and hereby is erected into a Town by the 
name of Fredericks Town." 

" And all that part of the said County of Dutchess, bounded 
Southerly by the County of Westchester, Westerly by Fred- 
ericks Town, Northerly by the northern line of Fredericks 
Town continued to Connecticut, and Easterly by Connecticut: 
shall be, and hereby is erected into a Town by the name of 
Southeast Town." 

The history of these towns and their subsequent changes, will 
be given in separate chapters, but as the town of Fredericks was 
a few years later divided, the list of town officei's up to the time 
of its division is here given. At the first election in 1788, the fol- 
lowing officers were elected: Supervisor, Reuben Ferris; town 
clerk, John Sickly: assessors, Samuel Towner, David Crosby, 



158 HISTORY OF PUTXAM COUNTY. 

jr., Benjamin Crosby, David Cole; collector. Timothy Carver; 
constables, Archibald Luddington, Matthew Beale, Jesse Smith, 
Timothy Carver; overseers of poor, Samuel Towner, Theodoras 
Crosby, Benjamin Crosby. 

The last change that was made in the towns previous to the 
establishment of Putnam county was the following act, passed 
March 14th, 1S06: 

''An Act to annex a part of the town of Philips to the town 
of Fishkill in Dutchess County." 

"Be it enacted by the People of the State of New York, 
represented in Senate and Assembly. That from, and after, 
the passing of this act, all such part of the town of Philips as 
lies north and west of a line beginning by the north river at 
the South westermost end of Break neck hill, running from 
thence North fifty two degrees east to the division line between 
the same towns is hereby annexed to the town of Fishkill, any 
law to the contrary notwithstanding." 

li is this change that caused the northwest corner of Putnam 
county to appear to be cut off, as it really is. 

Reuben Ferris was re-elected to the office of supervisor of 
Frederickstown till 1795, the year of the division. 

The assessors in 17S9 were Samuel Towner, David Crosby jr., 
Jabez Berry, Solomon Hopkins; in 1790, Jacob Nelson, David 
Crosby jr., Jabez Berry, Solomon Hopkins; in 1791, David 
Cole, Thatcher Hopkins, Samuel Towner. 

The disproportion, in the geographical extent of Fredericks- 
town and Southeast, was so apparent and the inconveniences 
arising from it were so manifest, that the proposal to divide 
these towns met with great favor, and in accordance with this 
general desire the Legislature, in 1795, j^assed the following 
Act: 

" An Act to dic'tde Frederickstoion and Southeast town in 
DidcJiess county, into four towns. 

Passed 17tli of March, 1795. 

" Bk it exacted hy the People of the State of New York, 
■represented in Senate and Assembly, That all that part of 
Frederickstown, lying west of the east line of Philips' s long lot, 
and south of a line to begin at a point in the west bounds of 
Frederickstown, six miles from the north bounds of the county 
of Westchester, and running north eighty-seven degrees, and 
thirty minutes east to the State of Connecticut, shall be erected 



GEXEKAL HISTORY. 159 

into a separate town, by the name of Carmel, and the lirst town 
meeting in the said town of Carmel, shall be held at the dwelling 
house of John Crane, Esquire, in said town. That all those 
parts of Frederickstown and Southeast town, lying east of the 
said east line, of Philips' s long lot, and south of the above 
mentioned line, beginning at a point in the west bounds of said 
Frederickstown, six miles from the north bounds of the 
county of Westchester, and running north eighty seven degrees 
and thirty minutes east, and continued to the State of Con- 
necticut, shall be erected into a separate town, by the name of 
Southeast, and the first town meeting in the said town of South- 
east shall be held at the dwelling house of Zalman Sanford in 
the said town, that all those parts of Fredericks Town and 
South-East town, lying east of the said east line of Philips's 
long lot, and north of the above mentioned line, beginning at a 
point in the west bounds of said Fredericks-town, six miles 
from the north bounds of the county of West-Chester, and run- 
ning north eighty-seven degrees, and thirty minutes east, and 
continued to the State of Connecticut, shall be erected into a 
separate town, by the name of Franklin, and the first town 
meeting in the said town of Franklin, shall be held at the 
dwelling house of James Philips, in the said town, and that all 
the remaining part of Fredericks-town, shall remain and con- 
tinue a separate town, by the name of Frederick, and the first 
town meeting in the said town of Frederic, shall be held at the 
dwelling house of the widow Boyd, in the said town. 

'■'■And he it further enacted, That the towns herein before 
mentioned to be divided, shall be considered as divided from 
and after the first Monday in April next, and that the free- 
holders and inhabitants of the said towns, respectively shall be, 
and hereby are empowered to hold town meetings and elect 
such town officers as the freeholders and inhabitants of the 
other towns of this State, elect by a law entitled, 'An act for 
dividing the counties of this State into towns, passed 7th March 
17SS,' and that the town officers to be by them elected, shall 
have the like powers and privileges, as the freeholders and in- 
habitants, and town officers of any other town in this State, may 
exercise by tlie law aforesaid. 

'■'And he itfurtlter enacted. That as soon as may be after the 
first Tuesday in April next, the supervisors and overseers of 
the poor of the towns aforesaid, shall by notice to be given for 



160 IIISTOEY OF PUTNAM COUJfTY. 

that purpose by the supervisors of the towns aforesaid, meet 
together and apportion the poor maintained by the said towns 
previous to the division thereof, between the said former towns 
and the towns erected by this act into separate towns in an 
equitable manner; and if the supervisors and overseers of the 
poor cannot agree upon such division of the poor as afore- 
said, then and in such case the supervisors of the county, shall 
at their next meeting, apportion and divide the poor maintained 
as aforesaid, in such manner as shall appear to them most just 
and equitable, and the said towns shall thereafter respectively 
maintain their own poor." 



CHAPTER Xn. 

» 

ESTABLISHMENT OF PUTNAM COUNTY; COUNTY INSTITU- 
TIONS AND COUNTY OFFICERS. 

REVISED BY HON. EDWARD WRIGHT. 

IN March, 1S07, a bill was introduced into the Legislature to 
divide Dutchess county. This bill passed the Senate by a 
vote of 16 to 13, but was lost in the Assembly by a vote of 4S 
to 47. In a motion to reconsider, the vote stood 49 to 49, and 
the speaker voting in the negative, the motion was lost. 

In the Journals of the Legislature, of 1812, is the following: 
"Monday, March 9th. The petition of sundry inhabitants of 
the Southern part of Dutchess County comprised in the towns 
of Philipstown, Carmel, Frederick, Southeast and Patterson, 
praying for a division of the County, and the erection of the 
southern part thereof into a new county: was read and referred 
to a select committee, consisting of Mr. Comstock, Mr. Crosby, 
Mr. Trowbridge, Mr. Darrow and Mr. Stanly." 

"March loth, Mr. Taylor then made a motion that pursuant 
to the order of the day, the house should resolve itself into a 
committee of the whole on the bill entitled, ' An Act to divide 
the County of Dutchess.' 

"Mr. Radcliff then made a motion that the house should 
agree to a resolution with a recital which was read in the words 
following, to wit, AVhereas it is reported to this house by a 
member thereof from the County of Dutchess, that the names 
of several persons appearing upon the petition heretofore pre- 
sented, for the division of the County of Dutchess, have been 
subscribed thereto without their knowledge or consent, which 
fact is also verified by affidavit. Resolved that the further con- 
sideration of the bill for dividing the County of Dutchess, be 
postponed till next Session to the end that in the mean time 
11 



162 HISTORY OF PUTXAM COTT^^TY. 

due inquiry be made into tlie truth of said allegation and meas- 
ures be taken respecting the same." "The Yeas and Nays 
being called for by Mr. Jones, seconded by Mr. Bryan, were as 
follows: Nays f56, Aff. 42." "Thereupon the house resolved 
itself into a committee of the whole, and after some time spent 
thereon, Progress was reported, and leave asked for, and 
granted, to sit again." 

" May 25th. The house then resolved itself into a committee 
of the whole on the bill to divide Dutchess County. That all 
that part of the County of Dutchess included in The towns of 
Philipstown, Carmel, Frederick, Patterson and Southeast, 
bounded on the east by Connecticut, on the south by West- 
chester County, on the west by Hudson river, and on the north 
by the towns of Fishkill and Pawling, shall be, one separate 
and distinct County, and shall be called and known by the name 
of ." "Passed, Yeas 58, Nays 38." "Ordered 

that the committee of the whole be discharged from the con- 
sideration of the last mentioned bill, and that it be referred to 
a select committee consisting of Mr. Taylor, Mr. Van Rensalaer 
and Mr. Weeks, to report the same complete." 

" May 29th, the engrossed bill, an 'Act to divide the County 
of Dutchess' read the third time. Mr. Speaker put the ques- 
tion, carried. Yeas 62, Nays 34." 

" An ACT to dii-ide the County of Dutchess. 

"Passed June 12, 1812. 

"I. Be it enacted by the people of the State of New York, 
represented in Senate and Assembly, That all that part of the 
county of Dutchess included in the towns of Philipstown, Car- 
mel, Frederick, Patterson and Southeast, bounded on the east 
by Connecticut, on the south by Westchester county, on the 
west by Hudson's river, and on the north by the towns of Fish- 
kill and Pawling, shall be one separate and distinct county, 
and shall be called and known by the name of Putnam. 

" TI. And be it further enacted. That there shall be held in 
and for the said county of Putnam a Court of Common Pleas, 
and a Court of General Sessions of the Peace, and that there shall 
be two terms of the same courts in the same county in every 
year, to commence as follows, to wit: The first term of the said 
court shall begin on the third Tuesday in October, and the 
second term shall begin on the second Tuesday in April, and 



GENERAL HISTORY. 163 

may continue to be held until the Saturday following, inclusive; 
and the said Courts of Common Pleas and General Sessions of the 
Peace shall have the same jurisdiction, powers and authority, 
in the said county, as the Courts of Common Pleas and General 
Sessions of the Peace in the other counties of this State have in 
their respective counties: Provided, That nothing in this act 
contained shall be construed to affect any suit or action, in any 
court whatever, already commenced before the last Monday in 
June, in the year one thousand eight hundred and twelve, so as 
to work a wrong or prejudice to any of the parties therein, or 
to affect any criminal or other proceedings on the part of the 
people of this state, but all such civil and criminal proceedings 
shall and may be prosecuted to trial, judgment and execution, 
as if this act had not been passed. 

"III. And be it further enacted. That the said Courts of 
Common Pleas and General Sessions of the Peace, in the said 
county of Putnam, shall be holden at the Baptist meeting 
house, in the town of Carmel, until a court ho.use shall have 
been built as herein after directed and provided, after which 
time it shall and may be lawful for the said courts to adjourn 
to the said court house, and thereafter continue to hold the 
terms of the said courts at the said court house, and no action 
or prosecution depending in the said courts shall be abated, dis- 
continued or in any wise prejudiced in law by such adjourn- 
ment. 

"IV. And be it further enacted, that the freeholders and in- 
habitants of the said county hereby erected, shall have and en- 
joy all and every the same rights, jDowers and privileges, as the 
freeholders and inhabitants of any other county in this state 
are by law entitled to have and enjoy. 

" Y. And be it further enacted. That the said county of Put- 
nam shall be entitled to elect one member of Assembly, and 
the county of Dutchess shall be entitled to elect five members 
of Assembly, in the same manner as other counties in this state 
are by law entitled. 

"VI. And be it further enacted; That it shall be the dutj' of 
the supervisors of the said counties of Dutchess and Putnam to 
meet together on the first Tuesday in October in the year one 
thousand eight hundred and twelve, at the village of Pough- 
keepsie, and adjust all accounts, and apportion all the monies 
in the hands of the treasurer of the said county of Dutchess, as 



164 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

to them, or a majority of them, shall appear just and equit- 
able. 

" VII. And be it further enacted, That the supervisors in the 
several towns in the county of Putnam, for the time bein^, or 
a majority of them, shall be and they are hereby authorized 
and required to direct to be raised and levied on the freeholders 
and inhabitants of the said county, a sum not exceeding six 
thousand dollars for building a court house and gaol in said 
county, with the additional sum of three cents on each dollar 
for collecting the same which sums shall be raised at such times 
levied and collected, in the same manner as the other necessary 
and contingent charges of the county are levied and collected 

"VIII. And be it further enacted, That Joseph Crane, 
Stephen Barnura, Joel Frost, Jonathan Ferris and John Jewitt, 
are hereby appointed commissioners to fix on the site of a court 
house and gaol in said county of Putnam, and to superintend 
the building thereof; and the said commissioners, or a majority 
of them, may contract with workmen, and purchase materials 
for erecting said court house and gaol, and shall, from time to 
time, draw upon the treasurer of the said county for such sums 
of money, for the purpose aforesaid, as shall come into the 
treasury by virtue of this act; and the treasurer is hereby re- 
quired, out of the monies aforesaid, to pay to the order of the 
said commissioners the several sums of money to be by them 
drawn for, and it is hereby made the duty of the said commis- 
sioners to account with the supervisors of the said county for 
the monies which they shall have received from the treasury, 
when thereunto required. 

"IX. And be it further enacted. That it shall and may be 
lawful for all courts, and officers of the said county of Putnam, 
in all cases criminal and civil, to confine their prisoners in the 
gaol of the county of Dutchess, until a gaol shall be erected and 
finished, in the manner hereafter mentioned, in the said county 
of Putnam. 

'• X. And be it further enacted. That the building to be 
erected for a gaol at the'jjlace which shall be designated as 
aforesaid, shall be the gaol of the said county of Putnam; and 
as soon as the same shall be completed in such manner as, in 
the opinion of the sheriff of the county, is sufficient to confine 
his prisoners, it shall and may be lawful for such sheriff to 
remove his prisoners, either upon civil or criminal process, to 



GENERAL JIISTORY. 16.T 

such a gaol, and confine them therein, and such removal shall 
not be deemed an escape in such sheriff. 

"XL And be it further enacted, That it shall be lawful for 
the treasurer of said county of Putnam to retain in his hands 
one cent on each dollar for his trouble in receiving and paying 
out the monies directed to be raised in the said county by this 
act.'' 

On the 7th of September, 1812, Dr. Robert Weeks, who was 
a member of the Legislature when the act was passed, sold to 
the supervisors of the county of Putnam, "all that certain lot 
of land situated in the town of Carmel, bounded as follows: 
Beginning at a poplar tree marked P. standing on the east side 
■of the highway, thence south five degrees east, two chains; 
thence north eighty five degrees east, two chains, fifty links; 
thence north, five degrees west two chains, thence to the place 
of beginning, containing one half acre, for the purpose of erect- 
ing thereon a Court House and Gaol for the county of Putnam, 
and such other buildings as shall be necessary for the con- 
venience and accommodation of said county and no others." 

The Court House was built in 1S14, the first court being held 
in it February 15th, 1815. Previous to that they were held in 
the Baptist meeting house. In 1842, an act was passed by the 
Legislature, authorizing the county officers to sell the Court 
House and grounds, as a change of site was strongly urged, 
one party being in favor of moving the county seat to Cold 
Spring, while another favored a new site near the south end 
'of the village of Carmel. When it was found that the deed did 
not permit the erection of any other than county buildings, the 
subject was dropped and never afterward agitated. The Court 
House was repaired and imi^roved about 1840, at which time the 
present portico and pillars and the belfry were added. The 
jail was a very small stone building standing at the north- 
east corner of the Court House. The Court House was again 
repaired and enlarged in 1855, and the present jail was then 
built. The first county clerk's office was a small one story 
building, nearly square, built of brick, with a slate roof and a 
marble floor. This was built in pursuance of an Act passed 
April 17th, 1822, "authorizing the building of a flre-proof 
Clerk's office in the County of Putnam," by which the super- 
visors were to appoint three commissioners to build the office, 
and tlie sum of $750 was to be raised by tax to pay for the same. 



166 



HISTORY OF VJTNAM COUNTY. 



Before that time the office of the county clerk was wher- 
ever he resided. The present county clerk's office was 
built in 1871, in pursuance of a resolution of the Board of 
Supervisors, by which Saxton Smith, Charles VV. Budd. and 
Sylvester Mabie were appointed " a building committee to cause 
to be erected a fireproof building on or near the site of the 
present Clerk's office, with sufficient accommodations for the 
county clerk's and surrogate's offices," and they were authorized 
to borrow $10,000 for that purpose. The committee reported 
on December 20th, 1871, that they had contracted with 




COLRT HOCbL AND COLNT\ CUPKS 01 1 ICI- 



Thaddeus R. Ganung for the erection of the building and that 
the contract had been fulfilled and that they had given him 
ten bonds of the county for 81,000 each in payment. The 
stone was taken from a quarry north of Lake Gilead. Some 
of the stone which was originally cut for the proposed Drew 
Seminary was used in the building. 

The civilization and enlightenment of the present age, is shown 
by nothing more plainly than by the care and attention that are 
now bestowed upon the unfortunate persons who are de- 
pendent on public charity. During the times of the '• Pre- 



GENERAL HISTORY. 167 

cincts," and up to the j'ear 1S30, the poor were snpiiorted by 
the barbarous practice of " farming out,'' by which they were 
sold to the lowest bidder and their style of support corresponded 
to the small sums received for their maintenance. In 1S30, the 
su]3erintendents of the poor purchased from Warren Townsend 
three acres of land in the town of Kent, bounded east by the 
west line of Philipse Long Lot No. 6, south and west by the 
brook, and north by Ferris Brown; and another piece of 106 
acres east of the same; and also another piece of 27 acres on the 
east side of the highway. They also bought 50 acres of Abra- 
ham Hopkins, bounded east by Philipse Lot line. The second 
piece of 106 acres bought of Townsend is bounded west by 
Philipse Lot line. This line runs west of the house and build- 
ings and crosses the brook and the highway toward the north 
end of the farm. Some lots of woodland have since been pur- 
chased for the use of the institution. 

In 1856, the office of the county superintendent of poor was 
abolished, and the Board of Supervisors were authorized to 
employ a keeper of the poor house, who makes an annual 
report. 

The old house and buildings becoming dilapidated and en- 
tirely unfit for the purpose for which they were intended, an 
effort was made by some ladies connected with the State Board 
of Charities, to have more suitable accommodations provided 
for the poor. Prominent among those who thus exerted them- 
selves in the cause of humanity, were Miss Julia Livingston, 
Mrs. G. Miller, Mrs. Benjamin D. Crane and Miss Martha Barnes. 
As usual in those cases the proj^osal met with some opposition 
from the selfish, but at length the Board of Supervisors took 
action and the present convenient and comfortable buildings were 
erected in 1S79. The number of paupers supported here dur- 
ing the past year was 4-1, and the management, under the care 
of William C. Entrott, is creditable to the county. 

The cost of building the Court House and jail is shown by the 
following extracts: 

" At a meeting of the Supervisors at the house of W^idow 
Waring, August 26th, ISlo, the Commissioners for building the 
Court House in & for the County of Putnam, the Commission- 
ers made and presented to the Supervisors an account of the 
expenses for the Court House for monies paid for the building, 
the account accex)ted.'" 



1(38 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COCNTV. 

" The County of Putnam. Dr. 

" To Joseph Crane for thirty-nine days service as Com- 
missioner for building Court House. . . . S~S 00 

Dr. to . 45 

33 
" To Stephen Barnura for 33 days service as Commis- 
sioner for building Court House 866 00 

Dr. to . 30 

36 
" To Joel Frost for 25 days service as Commissioner for 

building Court House SoO 

Dr. to . 30 



20 
To John Jewitt 28 days as Commissioner for build- 
ing Court House ^55 

Dr. to . 30 



25 
" To Jonathan Ferris 8 days as Commissioner to build 
the Court House. 816 

" Memorandum of Monies expended by the Commissioners 
appointed to fix the site and build a Court House and Gaol for 
the County of Putnam. 
"To Cash paid to James Townsend for Building 

Court House & Gaol as per contract. . . .83,800 00 

" To Cash paid for extra iron 41 16 

" To Cash paid for chairs for Court room. . . 16 00 

" To Cash paid for extra timber 12 00 

" To Cash paid extra iron and Smith work. . . 13 7(^ 



83,882 86"' 

"Agreement with Supervisors of Dutchess County. 

"These may certify that we the Subscribers, Supervisors of 
the County of Dutchess and Putnam for the present year, hav- 
ing met at the Court House of Poughkeepsie on the first Tues- 
day iu October, 1812, pursuant to a law of the State of New 
York passed June 12th in the same year, for the purpose of 
adjusting accounts in the said counties, and appropriating the 



GENERAL HISTORY. 169 

monies thereof, have agreed and determined as follows, viz : 
that each county shall pay the respective charges for removing 
paupers and. special Courts of Sessions originating or held in 
the towns Composing or Constituting the said counties and 
that we find due from the County of Putnam to the County of 
Dutchess the sum of one hundred and ninety two dollars and 
thirty-five cents, which the Supervisors of the said County of 
Putnam for themselves promise and engage shall be paid to the 
Treasurer of Dutchess, on or before the first day of March next 
ensuing the date hereof. And the Supervisors of the County of 
Dutchess do by these presents for themselves and their succes- 
sors exonerate and discharge the said County of Putnam from 
all charges and demands, originating or existing under the 
County of Dutchess, anterior to the 12th day of June, 1812. 
Cxiven under our hands and seals this 8th day of October, 
1812. 

" Elisha Barlow, Chairman, John Hayt, 

" Henry A. Livingston, Joshua Barnum, 

" John Cox Jr., Barnabas Carter, 

" Jeremiah Sherill, Jonathan Ferris,'' 

" Du Bois, John Hazen, 

" Archibald Campbell, Supervisors of the Co. of 

" Aaron Stockton, Putnam. 

' James Ketcham, 
" Isaac Sherwood, 
'• Samuel Mott, 

" Supervisors of the Co. of 

" Dutchess." 

At the organization of the County Court, John Jewitt was 
the first clerk, and appointed Robert Weeks his deputy. The 
following is the record of the first term : 

"October Term 1S12. 

"At a Court of Common Pleas held at the Baptist Meeting 
house in the town of Carmel, in and for the County of Putnam, on 
the 20th day of October 1812. Present : Stephen Barnum, First 
Judge ; Robert Johnston. Harry Garrison, Barnabas Carver. 
Judges. 

" Court opened by Proclamation at the hour of 12 o'clock. 



170 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

"Proclamation that Sheriff return all Process, returnable 
here this day. 

"Wm. H. Johnston, high Sheriff of the County aforesaid 
returns the venires with the panel of Jurors annexed. 

•'Proclamation that the Jurors apjpear and answer. 

'.' The panel being called the following Jurors appear, viz : 
Benjamin Benedict, Benjamin Carl, Peter Terry, Ebenezer 
G. Palmer, Philo Lewis, Samuel Maybee, John Foshay, Eden 
Curtis, Edward Smith Jr., Joseph Colwell, Jesse Cole, David 
Knapp, Cyrus Horton, Stephen Purdy. Ezra Hubbell, Elijah 
Townsend, John Gregory, Peter Harvey, Jeremiah Maybee, 
William Ally, William Miller, Archibald Young, and Darius 
Doane. 

"Ordered by the Court here now sitting that the seal here- 
unto annexed, with the following device to wit, an oxes head, 
and a two handled plough with the words (seal of Putnam 
County Common Pleas) be adopted as the seal of this Court, 
and that precepts and process or proceedings which require 
the seal of the Court shall be sealed with said seal. 

"Geo. W. Niven applies to the Court now sitting for R. C. 
Austin to be admitted as an attorney & counsellor at Law in 
this Court. Ordered he be admitted as such. 

" Geo. W. Niven makes application to this Court now sitting 
for Joseph Silliman to be admitted as an Attorney and Counsel- 
lor at Law in this Court. The like order. 

" George W. Niven makes application to this Court, for 
• Walker Todd to be admitted as a Counsellor and Attorney at 
Law of this Court. Ordered he be admitted as such. 

" On presenting of the license of William Nelson in the 
Supreme Court of this State whereby it appears that he is an 
Atty. of th:it Court. Ordered on his own motion that he be 
admitted as an Attorney & Counsellor at Law of this Court. 

" The like order as to Frederick Stone. J. Coffin, William 
Silliman, and John Oppie. 

"Stephen Lyon as one of the petty Jurors absent and sick. 
By the oath of Benjamin Cowl. Ordered him excused. 



CtExekal history, 



171 



COKXELIL'5 TOMPKI>'S 



Oliver Cole. 



Jonathan Ferris 

ns. 

Israel Owens. 



On .filing of the Oyer Com. 
1 Bail Bond. and. also a cogno- 
vit of the Attorney for the 
I Deft, whereby he confesses 
I the Debt of the Pl'f. in this 
I cause to eighty dollars, on 
J Motion of Mr. Oppie A'tty. 
for Prf, ordered Judgment. 

"1 



1^ The like to one hundred 
I dollars of Debt. 



Cornelius Tompkins 

m. 

Thomas Denny. 



I The like in all things for 
I 8150 Debt. 



Martha Sickely 



Ezra Hubbell. 



1^ The like in all things for 
I 842 damage. 



"Court met pursuant to adjournment. 

"Present — Stephen Barnum, .Eobert Johnston, Barnabas 
Carver, Judges. 

" Court adjourned until the next Term of Common Pleas to 
be held at this place." 

"June 3rd. 1S13. On application of Joseph Crane Esq., one 
of the Judges of this Court, for the manumission of Ximrod a 
man of Colour belonging to said Joseph Crane, whereupon the 
Court on due examination find said slave to be under the ao-e 
of fifty years and of sufficient bodily strength and. ability to 
maintain and support himself and that said applicant has com- 
plied with the regulations of the Statute in such case made and 



172 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

provided. Therefore the Court orders and directs the said 
Nirarod to be manumitted and also do exonerate and discharge 
the said Joseph Crane and his heirs from rendering the said 
Nimrod any further support or sustentation." 

The jail limits as established in ISIS, " began at a stump near 
the margin of the pond nearly west from the school house." 
The. school house here mentioned stood at the north end of the 
park, opposite the present school building. The bounds then 
ran east 17 chains, 90 links, then north 58 chains, then west 17 
chains, then south 27 chains "to a Button wood tree at the 
shore of the pond and at the southeast corner of Charles 
Minur's garden" (now the residence of Edwin Fisher), and 
thence to the beginning, embracing an area of 110 acres. These 
were enlarged, in 1820, to 141 acres. 

It will be noticed that the act establishing Putnam county 
simply sets off certain towns as a new county, without actually 
defining the true line between Putnam and Dutchess. The act 
of the Colonial Legislature in establishing the South Precinct 
of Dutchess county, describes it as including the whole of the 
patent granted to Adolph Philipse. Whether the true county 
line was the north line of the "Gore," or the line of the sur- 
vey of the Philipse Patent, run in 1753, or a due east line from 
the mouth of Fishkill Creek, remained in doubt and uncer- 
tainty. In 1832, an act was passed "To survey and settle the 
North Boundary Line of the County of Putnam." "It shall 
be the duty of the Surveyor General to survey, run out and 
designate by proper land marks, the boundary line between the 
Counties of Putnam and Dutchess, the same being the northerly 
line of the County of Putnam, as the same is described in the 
third volume of the Revised Statutes, as nearly as the said 
boundary line can be ascertained, but such survey shall not be 
made until the exj^ense thereof shall be provided for by the 
counties of Dutchess and Putnam, or one of them." 

There were three lines proposed. The first consisted of the 
Compromise] Lines, or the north lines of the Gores of the 
Rumbout and Beekman Patents. The second was the line of 
survey of the north line of the Philipse Patent, in 1753, which 
began at the mouth of Fishkill Creek and ran north, 87 degrees 
east, to the Oblong. The third was a due east line from the 
mouth of Fishkill Creek, to the Connecticut line. A map 
showins; these lines is in the office of the secretarv of State. 



GENEKAL HISTORY. 173 

Among the records of the Board of Supervisors of Dutchess 
county, is a letter from the surveyor general, stating that he 
should consider the east and west line as the true boundary. 
A resolution of the Board of Supervisors of that county states 
that "the east and west line being generally known, there vvas 
no necessity of voting any money to locate it." Consequently 
nothing vvas ever done to mark the line by proper monu- 
ments. 

A traditionary line is accepted at various j^oints as the county 
line; for example, the south line of the farm of Gilbert Tabor, 
in Patterson, and the north line of the Ludington property, in 
Kent; but there is no certainty about the matter. No action 
was taken by Putnam county in regard to the disputed 
boundary. 

Judges of Putnam County Court of Common Pleas from 
1812 to 1SS4:— 1812, Stephen Barnum, 1st., Robert Johnston, 
Henry Garrison, Barnabas Carver. 1813, Joseph Crane, Robert 
Johnston, Henry Garrison, John Crane, Stephen Hayt. ISlo, 
Barnabas Carver, Robert Johnston, Henry Garrison, Jonathan 
Moreliouse, John Patterson. 1818, Henry Garrison, 1st., Bar- 
nabas Carver, John Patterson, Jonathan Morehouse. 1820, 
Abraham Smith, William Watts, David Jackson, John Patter- 
son, John Hoyt. 1821, Barnabas Carver, Jonathan Morehouse, 
William Watts, Abraham Smith. 1823, Henry Garrison, Bar- 
nabas Carver, Stephen C. Barnum, James Lowner, Edward 
Smith. 1829, Frederick Stone, 1st., Bennet Boyd, Samuel 
Washburn, Ebenezer Foster, Cyrus Horton. 1832, Henry Gar- 
rison. 1833, Bennet Boyd, 1st., David Kent. 1835, Stephen 
Pinckney. 183G, Ebenezer Foster. 1838, David Kent, Bennet 
Boyd, 1st., John Garrison. 184.1, Henry J. Belden, Cornelius 
Warren. 1843, Robert P. Parrott, 1st., Azor. B. Crane, Benja- 
min B. Benedict, Thatcher B. Theall. 1845, Nathaniel Cole. 
1847, Azor. B. Crane, elected Judge and Surrogate under the 
new Constitution of 1846. 

County Judges from 1847:— 1847, Azor. B. Crane. ISol, Am- 
brose Ryder. 1863, Edward Wright. 1SS4, William Wood. 

Surrogates from 1813 to 1847:— 1813, Joel Frost. 1819, 
Walke/Todd. 1821, Joel Frost. 1823, Jeremiah Hine. 1827, 
Jeremiah Hine. 1832, Walker Todd. 1836, W-alker Todd. 1839, 
Howard H. White. 1840, Abraham Smith. 1844, Azor. B. 
Crane. 



174 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

The offices of county judge and surrogate have been com- 
bined since 1846. 

District Attorneys:— 1818, Walker Todd. 1821, Frederic Stone. 
1829, Jeremiah Hine. 1838, Frederic Stone. 1847, Charles Ga 
Nun. 1850, John G. Miller.* 18.50. Frederic Stone. 18.53, John 
G. Miller. 1856, Peter M. Jordan. 1858, Levi H. McCoy. 1861, 
Jackson 0. Dykman. 1864, James D. Little. 1870, Samuel J. 
Owen. 1876. William Wood. 1883, Frederic S. Barnum. 1885, 
Abram J. Miller. 

Names of Attorneys on Court Roll :— 1812, Goorge W. Niven. 
1813, ' Frederic Stone, William Nelson, Amos Belden. 1815, 
Walker Todd, Henry B. Lee, William Brown, John Philips. 
1816, Cornelius Master, Philo Ruggles. 1817, William H. 
Johnston, Edward Buckbee, Moses Hatch, Jonas Strong. Isaac 
Hoffman, Robert P. Lee. 1818, E. Nye. 1819, James Youngs, 
Stephen Cleveland, James W. Oppie, Samuel B. Halsey, 
Jeremiah Hine, Samuel Youngs, J. W. Strang. 1820, Henry B. 
Cowles. 1836, Stephen D. Horton, Lewis Robinson. 1839, 
Eleazar M. Swift, Elijah Yerks, Howard H. White. 1840, 
Thomas Nelson, Ebenezer C. Southerland, Silas H. Hickok, 
Owen T. Coffin, William Fullerton. 1841, J. H. Ferris. 1842. 
Samuel F. Reynolds, Benjamin Bailey. 1843, John Curry, 
Charles Ga Nun, Peter S. Jordan, William J. Blake. 1844, 
John S. Bates, Thomas R. Lee, James H. Borland. 1846, 
William A. Dean, Calvin Frost. 1847, John G. Miller, James 
D. Stevenson, Charles M. Tompkins, Amri L. Dean. 1855, 
Charles H. Ferris. 1857; Thomas G. Barnum. 1866, Seymour 
B. Nelson. 1876, William Wood, George E. Anderson. 1877, 
James Gardiner. 1878, George W. Horton. 1880, Ward B. 
Yeomans. 1881, Clayton Ryder, Frederic S. Barnum. 

Representatives in Congress : — 1817, Henry B, Lee. 1837, 
Gouverneur Kemble. 1847, Cornelius Warren. 

State Senators:— 1828-31, Walker Todd. 1848-49, Saxton 
Smith. 1864-65, Saxton Smith. 

Members of Assembly:— 1814, Joshua Barnum, jr. 1815, 
David Knapp. 1816, Henry B. Lee. 1817, Edward Smith, jr. 
1818, William H. Johnston. 1819, Hart Weed. 1820, David 
Knapp. 1821, Elisha Brown. 1822, Edward Smith. 1823, Wil- 
liam Watts. 1824, Stephen C. Barnum. 1825, David Knapp. 
1826-28, Henry R Cowles. 1829, Thomas W. Taylor. 1830. 
James Towner. 1831, Bennet Boyd. 1832, Reuben D. Barnum. 
1833, John Garrison. 1834, Jonathan Morehouse. 1835, Daniel 



GENERAL HISTORY. 175 

Kent. 1S36, Moses C. Robinson. 1837, John Crawford. 1838, 
Saxton Smith. 1839, Herman R. Stephens. 1840, Saxton Smith. 
1841, James H. Cornwall. 1842, Ebenezer Foster. 1843, Sj-l- 
vanns Warren. 1844, Saxton Smith. 1845-47, Benjamin 
Bailey. 1847, Benjamin B. B.enedict. 1848, Chauncey R. 
Weeks. 1849, James J. Smalley. 1850-51, William Bowne. 
1852-53, :S"athan A. Howes. 1854-55, James J. Smalley. 1856, 
Benjamin Bailey. 1857, Chauncey R. Weeks. 1858, John Gar- 
rison. 1859-60, Edwin A. Pelton. 1861, Charles T. Brewster. 
1S62, Thomas H. Reed. 1863, Saxton Smith. 1864-65, Jeremiah 
Sherwood. 1866-67, Stephen Baker. 1868, Samuel D. Humph- 
rey. 1869-70, Morgan Horton. 1871, Sarles Drew. 1872, James 
B. Dykeman. 1873, William S. Clapp. 1874, Hamilton Fish, 
jr. 1875, William H. Christopher. 1876-79, Hamilton Fish, jr. 
1880, George McCabe. ISSl, Charles H. Everett. 1882, Robert 
A. Livingston. 1883, James W. Brooks. 1884, Henry D. Clapp. 
1885, Robert A. Livingston. 1886, Henry Mabie. 

County Clerks:— 1812, John Jewett. 1815, William H. John- 
ston. 1817, James Townsend, jr. 1820, Rowland Bailey. 1821, 
James Towner. 1822, Jonathan Morehouse. 1837, William H. 
Sloat. 1840, Reuben D. Barnum. 1852, Ira Mead. 1857, Agus- 
tus Hazen. 1860, Edward Wright. 1863, John K. Watt. 1875, 
Edward B. Thompson. 1884, Edward C. Weeks. 

Sheriffs:— 1812, William H. Johnston. 181314, Peter Crosby. 
1815-18, Peter Warren. 1819-20, Edward Buckbee. 1821, 
Joseph Cole. 1822 23, Edward Buckbee. 1826, Thomas W. 
Taylor. 1829, Joseph Cole, 2d. 1832, Nathaniel Cole. 1835, 
Thomas W. Taylor. 1838, George W. Travis. 1840, William 
W. Taylor. 1843, James Smith. 1846, William W. Taylor. 
1849, James J. Smalley. 1849, Joseph E. M. Nobby, ap. 1852, 
Harvey Mead. 1855, Charles T. Brewster. 1858, Daniel B. 
Lockwood. 1861, Charles T. Brewster. 1864, John J. Smalley. 
1867, John Butler. 1870, Richard R. Horton. 1873, James O. 
Cole. 1876, Edmund Doane. 1879, James 0. Cole. 1883. James 
J. Dakin. 1884, Jeremiah W. Hazen. 

County Treasurers:— 1848, Thomas W. Taylor. 1854, Leonard 
K. Everett. 1857, Addison J. Hopkins. 186(), James J. Smalley. 
1869, Thatcher H. Theall. 1870, John Cornish. 1873, Ambrose 
Ryder. 1873, Daniel Baker. 1876, Hillyer Ryder. 1885, Hillver 
Ryder. 

School Commissioners from 1859 to present time : — George F. 



176 JIISTOHV OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

Sherman, Jackson O. Dykman, Peter B. Curry, William Town- 
send, 2d, Charles H. Ferris, John H. Spencer, Thomas H. Reed, 
James A. Foshay. 

Coroners :— 1812, William Brown, Edward Buckbee. 1813, 
Edward Buckbee. 1816, Joseph Benedict, Samuel Townsend. 
1817, Joseph Benedict. 1818, Orrin M. Armstrong, i)avid 
Mooney, Henry Haldane, Samuel Townsend. 1819, Orrin M. 
Armstrong, Henry Haldane, Samuel Townsend. 1820, Henry 
Haldane, David Dingee, Erastus Smith, Orrin M. Armstrong, 
James Dykeman. 1821, James Dykeman, Henry Haldane, 
David Dingee, William Brown. 1822, Henry Haldane, Na- 
thaniel Delavan, James Dykeman. 1823, Henry Haldane, 
Azahel Cole, William Raymond. 1826, Benjamin Dykeman jr., 
William H. Sloat, Edmund Burtch, Nathaniel Delavan. 1829, 
William Raymond, John Garrison. 1832, Lewis Rogers, Sey- 
mour Allen, David Dingee, John F. Haight. 1835, Lewis 
Rogers, John F. Haight, Stillman Boyd. 1837, James J. 
Smalley. 1838, John F. Haight, Cornelius Nelson jr., Abraham 
Everett. 1839, Amos Tompkins, Sela Gage. 1841, Cornelius 
Nelson jr., Jeremiah Dewel. 1843, Addison J. Hopkins, James 
Barker. 1845, Hart Weed, Elisha C. Baxter, Cyrus Chase. 
1846, James Barker. 1847, John Simonson. 1848, Cornelius 
Dean. 1849, A. G. Travis. 1851, Jeremiah Dewel, George W^. 
Mikmak. 1852, Cornelius Dean, Henry W. Lewis. 1855, Har- 
rison Chapman. 1856, Henry Smith. 1859, Stephen Minor, 
Charles H. Minor. 1862, A. J. Barnes, Stephen Minor. 1863, 
Edwin Fowler, J. Hazen Perry. 1864, Robert A. Ketchum. 
1866, Andrew J. Foshay, J. Hazen Perry, Edmond J. Wixon. 
1868, Robert A. Fletcher, Alfred Bailey, Alvin Chase. 1869, 
Andrew J. Foshay, Sylvester B. Truesdell. 1871, Daniel Til- 
lotson. 1872, Charles Bullock. 1872, Daniel S. Judd. 1874, 
JosepL G. Cole, Philip D. Penny. 1875, Wellington Ketchum, 
Sylvester B. Truesdell. 1S77, Joseph G. Cole, Walter S. Crosby. 
1878, John A. Reed, Martin V. B. Stevens. 1880, Joseph G. 
Cole, Francis Butterfass. 1882, Martin V. B. Stevens. 1883, 
William H. Cowl, Francis Butterfass. 1884, John A. Reed. 
1885, Martin Y. B. Stevens. 

.■AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 

The Agricultural Society of the County was organized in 
1S51. Its first president was Thomas B. Arden, of Philipstown; 



(JKNEKAL HISTORY. 177 

first secretary, Hugh C. Wilson, of Putnam Valley; first treas- 
urer, Saxton Smith, of Putnam Valley. The first County Fair 
was held Oct. Sth and 9th, 1851, at Carmel. 

For several years its annual fairs were successively held at 
Carmel, Lake Mahopac and Brewster; Its fairs are now con- 
tinuously held at Carmel, the society having acquired a per- 
petual lease of about eight acres of land, on which it has erected 
a large and commodious building for its exhibitions and con- 
structed an excellent half-mile driving track. 



CHAPTER XIII. 

THE CLAIM OF JOHN JACOB ASTOR. 

THE most iraportant episode in the modern history of Put. 
nam county was the great trial and controversy which 
attended the claim of John Jacob Astor to the ownership of the 
reversionary right to the lands included in Lots 3, 5 and 9, 
which were the share of Mary Morris as one of the three owners 
of the Philipse Patent. For the full understanding of the 
origin of this claim, the reader is referred to the deed of mar- 
riage settlement made by Mary Philipse and Roger Morris pre- 
vious to their marriage, a copy of which may be found in this 
work. 

According to the terms of this deed, the lands belonging to 
Mary Philipse were to be to the use of Mary Philipse and her 
husband, Roger Morris, during their lives, and after their de- 
cease, the lands were to go to their children. After the Revo- 
lution Mary Morris and her husband removed to England and 
never afterward returned to their native land. As stated in a 
previous chapter their lands were confiscated and sold to various 
purchasers, most of whom were already in actual possession as 
tenants under Col. Morris and his wife. It soon became known 
that the only title which the State could lawfully give was the 
title actually existing in Mary Morris and her husband, at the 
time of the sale, and could not affect the title of their children. 

Roger Morris died about 1795, and his wife died July 2d, 
1825. The children of their marriage were: Amherst, who died 
unmarried and intestate, in 1S02; Joanna, who married Thomas 
Cowper Hincks; Margaret, who died when two years of age; 
Maria; and Henry Gnge Morris, all of whom resided in Eng- 
land. 

A petition was presented to the Legislature, February 16th 
17S7. by Joanna Morris on behalf of herself and her brothers 



GENERAL HIsfTOKY. 179 

and sisters, stating their claims and praying for relief. This 
petition was referred to a committee, who reported that if the 
statements therein made were true, the ordinary course of law 
was competent for their relief, without legislation, and this 
report was adopted by the Legislature. Some alarm was felt 
by the persons owning farms under the confiscation sale, for 
in 1807 a petition was presented to the Legislature by Enoch 
Crosby and others, calling attention to the claim presented by 
the children of Eoger Morris, and praying that steps might be 
taken to quiet these claims, but no decided action was taken. 

In 1809, John Jacob Astor, the famous millionaire of his day, 
purchased from the children of Roger Morris all their right to 
the lands in question. The conveyance was made in the old 
form of lease and release, by which the heirs gave a lease of the 
land "for one whole year," " In order that the said John Jacob 
Astor should be in actual possession, by force of the Statute 
for transferring uses into possession." The lease was dated 
December ISth, 1809, and a formal deed was executed on the 
following day as follows: 

" This Indenture made the nineteenth daj^ of December in 
the fiftieth year of the reign of our Sovereign Lord George the 
third by the grace of God of the United Kingdom of Great 
Britain and Ireland King defender of the faith and in the year 
of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and nine Between 
Thomas Cowper Hincks of Somerset street Portman Square in 
the Parish of Saint Mary Le Bone and Coiinty of Middlesex 
Esquire and Joanna his wife Maria Morris of the City of York 
Spinster & Henry Gage Morris of Somerset street aforesaid Es- 
quire a Commander in his Majesty's Royal Navy which said 
Joanna Hincks Maria Morris and Henry Gage Morris are the 
three surviving children of Mary Morris now of the said City of 
York but formerly of New York in America by Roger Morris 
her husband deceased of the one part and John Jacob Astor 
of the City of New York in America Merchant of the other 
part Whereas under and by virtue of Letters Patent of his 
Majesty King William the third under the Great Seal of the 
Province of New Y'ork bearing date on or about the seven- 
teenth day of June in the year one thousand six hundred and 
ninety-seven all that tract of Land in Dutchess County situate 
lying and being in the highlands on the east side of Hudsons 
river Besjinnina- at a red cedar tree marked V on the north side 



ISO HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

of the Hill commonly called Anthony's nose which is likewise 
the bound of Colonel Stephen Van Courtlandts land on his 
Manor of Courtlundt and from thence bounded by the said 
Hudsons river as the said river runs northerly until it comes 
to the Creek River or run of water called and known by the 
name of the great fish Kill to the northward and above the 
said Highlands which is likewise the southward bounds of 
land belonging to the said Colonel Stephen Van Courtlandt 
and Company and so easterly ialong the said Courtlandt' s line 
and the south bounds of Colonel Henry Beekman until it 
comes twenty miles or unto the division or partition line be- 
tween the Colony of Connecticut and the said Province and 
Easterly by the said division line and beiug bounded northerly 
and southerly by east and west lines unto the said division line 
between the said Colony of Connecticut and the Province afore- 
said the whole being bounded westward by the said Hudson's 
river northward by the Land of Colonel Courtlandt and Com- 
pany and the Land of Colonel Beekman eastward by the parti- 
tion line between the Colony of Connecticut and the Province 
of New York and southerly by the Manor of Courtlandt to the 
Land of the said Colonel Courtlandt including therein a certain 
Island at the north side of the said High Lands called 
Pollaples Island with the hereditaments and appurtenances 
thereto belonging and granted unto Adolph Philipse Esquire 
his heirs and assigns forever who shortly after the 
granting of the said Letters Patent departed this life intestate 
leaving Frederick Philipse Esquire his Nephew and heir 
at Law and Whereas the said Frederick Philipse in and 
by his last will and^ testament in writing duly executed and at- 
tested for the devise of Lands of Inheritance and bearing date 
on or about the sixth day of June in the year one thousand 
seven hundred and fifty-one devised the aforesaid tract of Land 
unto his son Philip Philipse his daughter Susannah then the wife 
of Beverly Robinson his daughters the said Mary Morris by her 
then name of Mary Philipse and Margaret Philijise in equal 
shares to them and the heirs of their bodies forever and if any or 
either of them should die without issue in such case the quarter 
part thereby devised to him her or those of them so dying with- 
out issue should be equally divided among the survivors And 
AVhereas the said Margaret the youngest daughter of the said 
Frederick riiilipse departed this life without having had any 



gp:neral history. ISl 

issue of her body Lawfully begotten whereby the said Philip 
Philipse Susannah Robinson and Mary Philipse became entitled 
to the said lands and hereditaments in equal shares And Where- 
as in or about the year one thousand seven hundred and fifty- 
three the said Philip Philipse Beverly Robinson and Susannah 
his wife and Mary Philipse duly suffered a common recovery of 
the said Land and hereditaments and under the uses of that re- 
covery became seized of the said tract of land and heredita- 
ments as Tenants in Common in fee And Whereas by indenture 
bearing date on or about the seventh day of February in the 
year one thousand seven hundred and fifty four duly acknowl- 
edged before Joseph Murray then one of his Majesty's Council 
for the said Province of New York and made or expressed to 
be made between the said Philip Philipse and Beverly Robin- 
son and Susannah his wife of the one part and the said Mary 
Morris by her then name of Mary Philipse of the other part 
after reciting the said Letters Patent herein before in part re- 
cited and also reciting that the said parties had by Jonathan 
Hampton their Surveyor divided the greatest part of the said 
tract of land and distinguished the same by Lots signed and 
delivered by Hampton and left with the said Beverly Robinson 
for the use of himself and the other Parties to the, now recitino- 
Indenture and that in order to have an equal division they had 
according to divers assortments made by the said Jonathan 
Hampton drawn their several Lots whereupon the Lots No. 3 
No. 5 and No. 9 and one third part of the meadow land lyina; in 
Lot No. 2 laid down in the Map did then belong to the share of 
the said INIary Morris then Mary Philipse and were butted and 
bounded as follows Lot No. 3 Beginning at two hemlock bushes 
standing in a Gully between Bull and Breakneck hills on the 
east side of Hudsons river and from thence running north seventy 
seven degrees East three hundred and eighty six chains to a 
heap of stones and walnut bush marked P. R. 1753 Standing in 
the west line of Lot No. 4 and is also the north east corner of 
Lot No. 2 then North ten degrees East two hundred and twenty 
eight chains to a heap of stones thirty links north of a white 
oak tree marked ■ P. 1753 being the north west corner of Lot 
No. 4 then south eighty seven degrees west four hundred and 
eighty chains to the mouth of the Fish Kill from thence down 
the several courses of Hudson's river to the beginnina: includ- 
ing PoUaples Island containing about eight thousand six hun- 



182 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTi'. 

dred acres. Lot No. 5 Beginning at a heap of Stones in the line 
of the Manor Courtlandt at the South East corner of Lot No. 
4 then north ten degrees east nine hundred and forty seven 
chains to a heap of stones at the north east corner of Lot No. 
4 then North eighty seven degrees east three hundred and 
forty four chains to a heap of stones which is the northwest 
corner of Lot No. 6 then south ten degrees west along the line 
of Lot No. 6 nine hundred and sixty chains to a heap of 
stones in the line of the Manor Courtlandt at the South 
west corner of Lot No. 6 then west along the line of the 
Manor Courtlandt three hundred and forty chains to the Begin-; 
ning containing about thirty one thousand two hundred acres. 
Lot No. 9 Beginning at a hemlock tree standing on the south 
side of the east branch of Croton River and a heap of 
stones on the north side which is also the south east corner 
of Lot No. 6 in the line of the Manor Courtlandt from thence 
running north ten degrees east three hundred and thirty three 
chains to a heap of stones and a walnut tree marked P. R. 1753 
on the south side of the hill near an old Meeting House in the 
line of Lot No. 6 being the South West corner of Lot No. 8 then 
east along the line of Lot No. 8 three hundred and thirty seven 
chains to a chestnut Bush marked P. R. 175.3 Standing in the 
oblong line on the west side of Rocky Hill which is the south 
east corner of Lot No. 8 then southerly as the oblong line runs 
three hundred and thirty chains to the north east corner of the 
Manor of Courtlandt in Peach Pond then west along the said 
Manor of Courtlandt three hundred and thirty six chains to 
the beginning containing about eleven thousand two hundred 
and twenty acres and the one third part of the Meadow Land 
lying in Lot No. 2 Beginning five chains from the upland upon 
Danfords Creek and running to Crooked Creek five chains from 
the upland then down Crooked Creek to the Meadow belonging 
to Lot No. 7 then north west to Martlers Rock then along the 
upland the North side of a little Island in the Meadow to the 
mouth of Danfords Creek then up the said Creek to the begin- 
ning containing about eighty two acres. It is Witnessed that 
in consideration of tlie mutual grant from the said Mary Morris 
then Philipse to the said Philip Philipse and Susannah Robin- 
son and their heirs of divers other lands in ihe said Letters 
Patent mentioned the said Philip Philipse and Beverly Robin- 
son and Susannah his wife did grant bargain sell alien release 



GEXEEAL HISTORY. 183 

and confirm unto the said I\Iar3' Morris then Philipse her heirs 
and assigns all and singular the Lots before described with the 
apiDurtenances To hold the same unto and to the use of the 
said Mary Morris then Philipse her heirs and assigns forever 
And "Whereas by Indenture of lease and release bearing date 
respectively on or about the twelfth and thirteenth days of 
January in the year one thousand seven hundred and fifty eight 
and made or expressed to be made between the said Mary Mor- 
ris then Philipse of the first part Major Eoger Morris of the 
second part and Joanna Philipse and the said Beverly Kobinson 
of the third part being the settlement made previous to the 
marriage then intended to be and afterwards duly solemnized 
between the said Roger Morris and the said Mary his wife. It 
is witnessed that for the consideration therein mentioned she 
the said Mary Morris then Philipse did grant bargain sell release 
and confirm unto the said Joanna Philipse and Beverly Robin- 
son and their heirs the aforesaid several lots or parcels of land 
herein before particularly described and all other the lands and 
hereditaments of her the said Mary Morris then Philipse To 
hold the same unto the said Joanna Philipse and Beverly Rob- 
inson and their heirs to the use of the said Joanna Philipse and 
Beverly Robinson and their heirs until the solemnization of the 
said then intended marriage and after the solemnization thereof 
to the use of the said Mary Philipse and Roger Morris and the 
survivor of them for and during the term of their natural lives 
without impeachment of waste Remainder to the use of such 
child or children as should or might be procreated between 
them and to his her or their heirs and assigns forever. But in 
case the said Roger Morris and Mary Philipse should have no 
child or children begotten between them or that such child or 
children should happen to die during the life time of the said 
Roger and Mary and the said Mary Morris then Philipse should 
survive the said Roger Morris without issue then to the use of 
the said ]\Iary ^lorris then Philipse her heirs and assigns for 
ever. And in case the said Roger Morris should survive the 
said Mary Morris then Philipse without any issue by her or that 
such issue should then be dead without leaving issue then after 
the decease of the said Roger Morris to the use of such person 
or persons as the said Mary Morris then Philipse should by 
her last will and testament appoint. And Whereas by Inden- 
ture bearing date on or about the fourteenth day of April 



184 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

in the year one thousand seven hundred and sixty one duly 
acknowledged before one of his Majesty's Council and made or 
expressed to be made between the said Philip Philipseand Bev- 
erly Robinson of the one part and the said Roger Morris of the 
other part after reciting the said herein before in part recited 
Indenture of the seventh day of February one thousand seven 
hundred and fifty four and also reciting that by Letters Patent 
under the great seal of the Province of New York dated the 
twenty seventh day of March then last therein reciting that the 
said Philip Philipse Beverly Robinson and Roger Morris by 
their petition to the Honorable Cadwallader Golden President 
of New York on or about the twenty sixth day of November 
then last past did set forth that in the year one thousand six 
hundred and eighty three a line of division was established be- 
tween the said Province of New York and the Colony of Con- 
necticut running parallel and at the equal distance of twenty 
Miles in all its parts from Hudsons river and that before 
the actual running of the said line the said in part recited Let- 
ters Patent bad issued to the said Adolph Philipse for all that 
tract of Land in Dutchess County hereinbefore described and 
that since the establishment of the said line and grant of the 
said Letters Patent certain Commissioners had been appointed 
by the then respective governments of New York and Connec- 
ticut for running out and marking the said line who finding it 
impracticable to perform the same exactly agreeable to the said 
Establishment did actually run and mark out a line as near as 
could be parallel to the main course of Hudsons River which 
line was afterwards confirmed that the said line so run not be- 
ing in all its parts the equal distance of twenty miles from Hud- 
sons River occasioned by the variation of its course from a 
straight line the said line as far as it extended along the rear of 
the said Patent did in some parts exceed and in other ^arts fall 
short of that distance notwithstanding which the said Adolph 
Philipse and those who held under him conceiving that the said 
line so actually run ought for reasons of public and private 
utility to be the rear line of the said Patent had always claimed 
and then claimed by virtue of the same all the lands included 
within the north and south boundaries of the said Patent as far 
Eastward from Hudsons River as the said line of division actu- 
ally run out and marked as aforesaid although some disputes 
had then lately arisen concerning the eastern bounds of the said 



GENERAL HISTORY. ISo 

Patent on pretense that the said tract thereby granted extended 
to the equal distance of twenty miles from Hudson's river in a 
similar line to the windings and turnings of the said river ac- 
cording to which construction a considerable tract would be ex- 
cluded the said Patent: But even admitting that there was 
some color for such a construction of the Eastern bounds of the 
said patent since the actual running and marking out of the 
said line as would restrict the said petitioners to the distance of 
twenty miles east of the said river in every part of their rear 
line which they conceived was not as yet a considerable part of 
the line granted by the said Letters Patent within that distance 
did lie to the eastward of the then present line of division and was 
held and enjoyed by others his Majesty's subjects not claiming 
under his said Letters Patent upon a supposition that the same 
were not included in the said patent since the running of the 
then present line of the division the petitioners in order to re- 
move all doubts and controversies were willing to surrender and 
release all their right and title to the same to his Majesty in 
trust for those of his subjects then holding the same on condition 
the petitioners obtaining a grant and confirmation of all the 
lands that might be between the distance of twenty miles from 
Hudson's river and the said then present line of division and 
the north and south bounds of the said Patent extended to 
the said line which would not only quiet the said inhabitants in 
their respective possessions but also prevent any further 
■controversy respecting the eastern bounds of the said 
Patent and that as the petitioners were willing to pay 
the usual quit rents for the said land lying between the 
•distance of twenty miles from Hudsons river and the 
then Colony line and the north and south bounds of the said 
Patent extended to the said line they humbly conceived them- 
selves equitably entitled to such grant and confirmation in pref- 
erence to any others who had no title to the same therefor the 
petitioners prayed his Majesty's Letters Patent confirming to 
them the said tract of land granted to the said Adolph Philipse 
and granting and contirming to them all other lands that might 
lie between the distance of twenty miles from Hudson's river 
and the said division line and the north and south bounds of 
the said Patent extended to the said line his Majesty gave 
granted ratified and confirmed to the said Philip Philipse Bev- 
erly Robinson and Roger Morris their heirs and assigns forever 



1S6 HISTORY OF PCTXAM COUNTY. 

as tenants in common all those two tracts or parcels of land situ- 
ate lying and being in the County of Dutchess at the distance 
of twenty miles from Hudson's river between the lands formerly 
granted to the said Adolph Philiijse deceased and the equiva- 
lent lands surrendered by the Colony of Connecticut to the 
Province of New York the one of which tracts begin at a monu- 
ment of a lai-ge heap of stones erected in the west bounds of the 
said equivalent lands thirty eight links north twenty five de- 
grees west from a large rock having the letters H. B. P. P. and 
B. R. marked thereon which said monument or heap of stones 
was erected in the month of April in the year one thousand 
seven hundred and fifty four by the proprietors of the lands 
formerly granted to Colonel Henry Beekman and of the afore- 
said lands formerly'granted to the said Adolph Philipse for a 
corner between and division between the said Patents and run- 
ning from the said monument or heap of stones along the south 
boundaries of the said Henry Beekman' s lands west ninety 
chains then south fifteen degrees west three hundred and sixty 
chains then south twenty four degrees east one hundred and 
sixty chains then south fourteen degrees east fifty nine chains 
to the said west boundaries of the said equivalent lands then 
along the said west boundaries five hundred and sixty chains 
to the place where the said tract began, containing four thou- 
sand five hundred and four acres and the usual allowances for 
highways and the other of the said tracts begins at a stake stand- 
ing in the north boundaries of the Manor of Cortlandt and on the 
west sid.e of a pond of water called Peach Pond and runs from 
the said stake along the north boundaries of the said Manor 
west thirty seven chains thence north forty two degrees east 
one hundred and thirty six chains to the west boundaries of the 
aforesaid equivalent lands then along the said west boundaries 
forty eight chains to the aforesaid Pond and then along the 
west side of the said Pond to the place where this second tract 
began containing four hundred and twenty one acres of land 
and the usual allowance for highways the said two tracts con- 
taining together four thousand seven hundred and twenty five 
acres and the usual allowance for highways and reciting that a 
part of the lands by the last recited Letters Patent granted was 
included within the bounds and limits of Lot 9 before described: 
It is by the now reciting Indenture of the fourteenth day of 
April one thousand seven hundred and sixty one witnessed 



GEXERAL HISTORY. 1S7 

that in consideration of mutual grants and releases from the 
said Roger Morris to the said Philip Philipse and Beverly- 
Robinson and of ten shillings the said Philip Philipse and Bev- 
erly Robinson did grant bargain sell alien convey release and 
confirm unto the said Roger Morris his heirs and assigns all 
such parts of the said lands by the said in part recited Letters 
Patent of the twenty seventh day of March granted as are in- 
cluded and comprehended within the boundaries and limits of 
the said Lot No 9 as herein and therein before described with 
the appurtenances except all mines and minerals whatsoever. 
To hold the same unto the said Roger Morris his heirs and as- 
signs forever and Whereas by an Act of the third session of 
the Legislature of New York passed on or about the twenty 
second day of October one thousand seven hundred and seventy 
nine entitled "An Act for the forfeiture and sale of the 
estates of persons who have adhered to the enemies of this State 
and for declaring the Sovereignty of the People of this State in 
respect to all property within the same" it was enacted that 
sundry persons therein named and among others the said Roger 
Morris Beverly Robinson Susannah the wife of the said Beverly 
Robinson and Mary the wife of the said Roger Morris and each 
of them should be and they were thereby severally declared to 
be ipso facto convicted and attainted of adhering to the enemies 
of the said State and that all and singular the estate both real 
and personal held and claimed by them severally and respec- 
tively whether in possession reversion or remainder within the 
State of New York on the day of passing that act should be 
and thereby was declared to be forfeited to and vested in the 
People of the State and Whereas the said Roger Morris de- 
parted this life in or about the month of September in the year 
one thousand seven hundred and ninety four leaving the said 
Mary Morris his widow him surviving and which said Mary Mor- 
ris his widow is still living and Whereas there were five children 
of the marriage between the said Roger Morris and Mary Morris 
that is to say the said Joanna the wife of the said Thomas Cowper 
Hincks Amherst Morris Margaret Morris and the said Maria 
Morris and Henry Gage Morris And Whereas the said Margaret 
Morris departed this life in or about the year one thousand 
seven hundred and sixty six an infant of the age of two years 
or thereabouts and whereas the said Amherst Morris also de- 
parted this life some time in the year one thousand eight hun- 



188 HISTOEY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

dred and two intestate and a batchelor and by the death of the 
said Amherst Morris and Margaret Morris as aforesaid the said 
Joanna Hincks Maria Morris and Henry Gage Morris became , 
and are now entitled to the said lands and hereditaments hereby 
released or intended so to be in equal shares And Whereas the 
interests of the said Joanna Hincks Maria Morris and Henry 
Gage Morris of and in the said lands and heredits are preserved 
to them by the fifth article of the definitive treaty of Peace 
between Great Britain andjthe United States of America bear- 
ing date on or abont the third day of September in the year one 
thousand seven hundred and eighty three by which it was de- 
clared that all persons who had any interest in Confiscated 
Lands either by debts marriage settlements or otherwise should 
meet with no lawful impediments in the prosecution of their 
just rights. And Whereas all the lauds and hereditaments 
mentioned and included in the said recited Letters Patent were 
not divided between the said Philip Philipse Mary Morris and 
Susannah Robinson. And W^hereas the said John Jacob Astor 
hath contracted and agreed with the said Thomas Cowper Hincks 
and Joanna Hincks his wife Maria Morris and Henry Gage 
Morris for the absolute purchase of all the Estate right title and 
interest of them the said Thomas Cowper Hincks and Joanna 
his wife Maria Morris and Henry Gage Morris of in to or out of 
the said lands or hereditaments hereinbefore mentioned and 
comprised in the said hereinbefore in part recited Indentures of 
the seventh day of February one thousand seven hundred and 
fifty four and the thirteenth day of January one thousand 
seven hundred and fifty eight and all other their lands and 
hereditaments in the Dutchess county aforesaid subject to the 
interest of the said State of New York or their Grantees therein 
for the life of the said Mar}' Morris and all other interests or 
claims conditions or consequences to which the same or any part 
thereof may can or shall be legally subject by reason or means 
of the said hereinbefore mentioned act of the Legislature of 
New York at or for the price or sum of twenty thousand pounds 
Now this Indenture Witnesseth that in consideration of the said 
sum of Twenty Thousand Pounds of lawful money current in 
Great Britain to the said Thomas Cowper Hincks and Joanna 
his wife Maria Morris and Henry Gage Morris well and truly 
paid by the said John Jacob Astor immediately before the exe- 
cution of these presents in equal shares and proportions the 



GENERAL HISTOISV. 1S9' 

receipt of which said sum of twenty thousand pounds 
they the said Thomas Cowper Hincks and Joanna his 
wife Maria Morris and Henry Gage Morris do hereby 
respectively acknowledge and thereof and of and from the 
same and every part thereof do and each and every of them 
doth acquit release and discharge the said John Jacob Astor 
his heirs executors administrators and assigns and every of 
them for ever they the said Thomas Cowper Hincks and Joanna 
his wife Maria Morris and Henry Gage Morris according to their 
several and respective shares estates rights and interests but 
not further or other^^^se Have each and every of them hath 
granted bargained sold aliened released and confirmed and by 
these presents do and each and every of them Doth grant bar- 
gain sell alien release and confirm unto the said John Jacob 
Astor his heirs and assigns in the actual possession of said 
John Jacob Astor now being by virtue of a bargain and sale 
thereof made to him by the said Thomas Cowper Hincks and 
Joanna his wife Maria Morris and Henry Gage Morris in con- 
sideration of five shillings paid to each of them by the said 
John Jacob Astor by Indenture bearing date the day next be- 
fore' the day of the date of these presents for one whole year 
commencing from the day next before the day of the date of 
the same Indenture of bargain and sale and by force of the 
statute made for transferring uses into possession all and 
singular the lands and hereditaments herein before particularly 
mentioned and described and by the said lierein before in part 
recited Indenture of the seventh day of February one thousand 
seven hundred and fifty four allotted to the said Mary Morris 
her heirs and assigns and also all and singular other the Lands 
and hereditaments comprized in the said herein before in part 
recited Indenture of the thirteenth day of January one thous- 
and seven hundred and fifty eight and all other their lands and 
hereditaments in Dutchess county aforesaid with their and 
every of their rights members and appurtenances subject Never- 
theless to the Estate vested in the said government of New 
York or their grantees for the life of the said Mary Morris and 
all othei' interests and claims conditiotjs or consequences to 
wliich the same or any part thereof may can or shall be legally 
subject by reason or means of the said act of the Legislature of 
New York as aforesaid and all houses cottages outhouses 
edifices buildings closes of land meadow and pasture woods 



190 HISTORY. OF PUTNAM COUIS-TY. 

and underwoods and the ground and soil thereof hedges ditches 
fences mounds ways paths passages waters land covered with 
water watercourses liberties privileges easements profits com- 
modities advantages emoluments and appurtenances whatsoever 
to the said land and hereditaments released or intended so to 
be or any of them respectively belonging or in anywise apper- 
taining or accepted reputed redeemed taken known held oc- 
cupied or enjoyed as part parcel or member of the same or of 
any of them respectively and the reversion and reversions re- 
mainder and remainders yearly and other rents issues and pro- 
fits thereof and of every part thereof and all the Estate right 
title interest use trust inheritance term and terms for years and 
for life or lives property possession benefit and equity of re- 
demption claim and demand whatsoever at law or in equity of 
them the said Thomas Cowper Hincks and Joanna his wife 
Maria Morris and Henry Gage Morris and each and every of 
them resi^ectively of in to and out of the same land and here- 
ditaments and every part thereof with the appurtenances and 
all deeds papers writings and muniments of title i whatsoever 
relating to or in any wise concerning the same or any of them 
as are now in the custody possession or power of the said 
Thomas Cowper Hincks and Joanna his wife Maria Morris and 
Henry Gage Morris or any or either of them and they or any 
or either of them can or may obtain without suit at Law or in 
Equity To have and to hold the aforesaid tract of Land heredi- 
taments and all and singular other the premises herein before 
mentioned and described and hereby released or otherwise 
assured or intended so to be and every part and parcel of the 
same with their and every of their rights members and ap- 
purtenances subject nevertheless as aforesaid unto the said 
John Jacob Astor his heirs and assigns To the only proper 
use of the said John Jacob Astor his heirs and as- 
signs forever and to and for no other use trust intent 
or purpose whatsoever And the said Thomas Cowper Hincks 
doth hereby for himself his heirs executors and administrators 
and only as to and concerning the estate and interest of him the 
said Thomas Cowper Hincks and of the said Joanna Hincks his 
wife in the premises and his and her acts deeds and defaults 
only And the said Maria Morris doth hereby for herself her 
heirs executors and administrators and only as to and concern- 
ing her estate and interest in the premises and the acts deeds 



GENKRAL HISTORY. 191 

and defaults relating thereto And the said Henry Gage Morris 
doth hereby for himself his heirs executors and administrators 
and only as to and concerning the estate and interest of him 
the said Henry Gage Morris in the premises and his acts deeds 
and defaults relating thereto covenant promise and agree to and 
with the said John Jacob Astor his heirs and assigns that not- 
withstanding any act deed matter or thing whatsoever made 
done permitted or suffered to the contrary by them the said 
Thomas Cowper Hincks and Joanna his wife Mary Morris and 
Henry Gage Morris or any or either of them they the said 
Thomas Cowper Hincks and Joanna his wife Maria Morris and 
Henry Gage Morris now have in themselves good right full 
power and lawful and absolute authority by these Presents to 
grant release and confirm the said land and hereditaments here- 
by released or intended so to be and every part and parcel of 
the same with the appurtenances unto and to the use of the 
said John Jacob Astor his heirs and assigns for ever in manner 
aforesaid and according to the true intent and meaning of these 
Presents and that free and clear and freely and clearly and ab- 
solutely acquitted exonerated released and discharged or other- 
wise by them the said Thomas Cowper Hincks and Joanna his 
wife Maria Morris and Henry Gage Morris their heirs executors 
or administrators at their some or one of their costs and charges 
in all things well and sufficiently protected defended saved 
harmless and kept indemnified of from and against all and all 
manner of former and other gifts grants feffments mortgages 
leases bargains sales jointures dower right and title of dower 
trusts Estates titles troubles charges leins and incumbrances 
whatsoever at any time or times heretofore and to be any time 
and from time hereafter had made done committed occasioned 
permitted or suffered by the said Thomas Cowper Hincks and 
Joanna his wife Maria Morris and Henry Gage Morris or any or 
either of them or any person or persons whomsoever rightfully 
claiming or to claim by from through nnder or in trust for them 
or any or either of them or by his their or any or either of their 
acts means consent default privity or procurement (The rents 
reserved in respect of the said premises only excepted) and 
moreover that they tlie said Thomas Cowper Hincks and Jo- 
anna his wife Mary Morris and Henry Gage Morris and their 
heirs and all persons whosoever lawfully or equitably and 
rightfully claiming or to claim any estate right title trust 



192 HISTORY OF putna:m county. 

charj^e or interest at law or in equity of into or out of or upon 
the said land and hereditaments by from under or in trust for 
them (except as aforesaid) shall and will from time to time and 
at all times hereafter upon every reasonable request and at the 
costs and charges in all things of the said John Jacob Astor 
his heirs or assigns make do acknowledge levy suffer execute 
and perfect or cause or procure to be made done acknowledged 
levied suffered executed and perfected all such further and 
other lawful and reasonable acts deeds devices conveyances and 
assurances in the law whatsoever for the further better more 
perfectly absolutely or satisfactorily granting releasing confirm- 
ing or otherwise assuring the said land and hereditaments 
hereby released or otherwise assured or intended so to be and 
every part and parcel of the same with the appurtenances 
(subject as aforesaid) unto and to the use of the said John 
Jacob Astor his heirs and assigns for ever according to the 
true intent and meaning of these presents as by the said John 
Jacob Astor his heirs or assigns or his or their counsel learned 
in the law and resident in England shall be reasonably advised 
devised or required and be tendered to be made done and exe- 
cuted so as for the making or doing thereof they shall not re- 
spectively be required to go or travel from their respective 
usual place of abode. 

"In witness whereof the said parties to these presents have 
hereunto set their hands and seals the day and year first above 
written. 

"Thomas Cowper Hincks. (L. S.) 
"Joanna Hincks. (L. S.) 

"Maria Morris. (L. S.) 

"Henry Gage Morris. (L. S.) 

" Signed sealed and delivered by the within named Thomas 
Cowper Hincks and Joanna his wife Maria Morris and Henry 
Gage Morris in the presence of us 

"M. S. Parnther, 

London Street. 
" Richard Grose Burfoot, 

Same place." 

After making this purchase, Astor sent an agent to notify the 
settlers of tliese lands of his purchase and claims, but no legal 
steps were taken by him until by the death of Mary Morris, in 



GENERAL HISTORY. 193 

1825, his title acquired full force and power, and a suit was then 
begun in the United States Court. 

The deeds which had been given by the commissioners of for- 
feitures were by law construed as full covenant warranty deeds, 
and the State was thus put under obligation to defend the suit 
which might be brought by Astor against any of the occupants 
of the lands, for ejectment. Accordingly an act was passed 
April 16th, 1827, " To extinguish the claim of John Jacob Astor 
and others, and to quiet the possession of certain lands in the 
counties of Putnam and Dutchess." By the provisions of this 
act it was agreed that if the United States Supreme Court should 
decide in favor of Astor' s claim, that then the State should pay 
in extinguishment of the title the sum of $250,000 and if the 
court should decide that Astor was entitled to the lands with 
all the improvements, then the State should pay the sum of 
8450,000. and the act to be in force in Case Astor and his asso- 
ciates should accept these terms in a formal manner, within the 
term of six months after its passage, and as a test of the claim, 
five suits in ejectment should be prosecuted to judgment in the 
Circuit Court of the United States, and the judgments presented 
by writs of erl-or to the Supreme Court for final determination, 
and if any three of the five suits should be decided in the favor 
of Astor he should be entitled to the sum named, which should 
be paid in certificates of public stock. 

These terms were not accepted and the case came to trial in 
the United States Circuit Court, in JN'ew York, November 7th, 
1827. Suits were begun against James Carver, who was in pos- 
session of a farm on Lot 5, which was sold to his father, Tim- 
othy Carver, by the commissioners of forfeitures: Samuel Kelly, 
who held a farm on Lot 9, in the town of Southeast; and Na- 
thaniel Crane, who also lived on Lot 5. 

The case, which attracted great attention, came to trial No- 
vember 7th, 1827. The following is the title of a printed 
report of the case, copies of which are extremely rare. 

'■Report of the Trial before Judges Thompson and Betts in 
the Circuit Court of the United States for the Southern Dis- 
trict of New York in the case of James Jackson ex dem. 
Theodosius Fowler and others vs James Carver including the 
claims of John Jacob Astor to lands in Putnam County with 
Arguments of Counsel and the charge of Judge Thompson by 
13 

/ 



194 HISTORY OF PLTTNAM COUNTY. 

Edwarcl Y. Sparhawk reported to the N. Y. American New 
York 1827/" 
Of this report we present the following brief abstract: 

" Circuit Court of the U. S. for the Southern 
District of N. Y. 

"James Jackson ex dem. Theodosius Fowler Tho. Cowper 
Hincks and Joanna his wife Mary Morris and Henry Gage Morris 
vs. James Carver. 

"Counsel for Plaintiff, Messrs Oaklej^ Hoffman, Eramett, 
Piatt, and Ogden. For Defendant Messrs Talcott Attorney Gen- 
eral, Webster, Yan Buren, Ogden Hoft'man and Cowls. 

"The defendant confessed lease, entry and ouster. Mr. Oak- 
ley opened the case for Plaintiff. 

" The Patent of Adolph Philipse was introduced m evidence, 
and the line of descent of the children of Mary Morris was 
shown. 

" Col. Tho. Barclay, Witness, testified that he knew the fam- 
ily of Roger Morris. His children were Amherst, Joanna, 
Henry Gage, and Maria, who were all born before 1774. Joanna 
was 10 years old in 1774. Amherst was a lieutenant in the 
Royal Navy at the time of the peace in 1783. Henry Gage was 
6 or 7 years old before the war. In 1783, he was 13 or 14 years 
old. 

"Henry Livingston witness, was called to produce map and 
show location of premises. It was admitted that James Carver 
was in possession of farm in Lot No. 5. 

" The Attorney General opened for the defence, and read the 
bill of Attainder against Roger Morris and his wife. 

" Daniel Cole, Witness, testifies that he is 79 years old and 
that he and his father before him, were tenants on Lot No. 5 
and held under Roger Morris. 

"Beverly Robinson testifies that his grandfather, Beverly 
Robinson, died about 1795, that Timothy Carver was the father 
of James Carver the defendant. He purchased the farm' of one 
Cheeseman, who had it from one Serrin. 

"Barnabas Carver testifies that he is uncle to the defendant 
James Carver, and that Timothy Carver was his brother. 

"Daniel Cole testifies that Timothy Carver bought the im- 
provement of the farm of one Cheeseman during the war, and 
that he built a log house there at the close of the war and 

' That is purchased the improvement of the farm from the former lessee. 



GE^'ERAL HISTORY. 195 

cleaved up more land, and he died three years ago. The ten- 
ants used to buy and sell among themselves before the war the 
improvements on the farms they held as tenants. Wm. Hill, 
James Rhodes and Hackaliah Merrit's father' bought land from 
Morris before the war. 

•-Enoch Crosby testifies that he has lived on the Patent 70 
years. In 1782, he went to live on Lot 9, and there were about 
150 families on Lots 5 and 9 before the war as tenants of Eoger 
Morris. 

"Isaac Hill testifies that he is 69, and has lived all his life 
on Lot 9. His brother Solomon died 12 years ago. 

"Nicholas Agoi- says he is 58, and has lived on Lot 5 all his 
life his father lived there 70 years ago. 

"Joseph Cole says he is 52 and lives on Lot 5 his father 
lived there before him and he bought the farm of his father in 
1802 or ISOa 

" Wm. Hill says that he lives on Lot 5 and about 20 years 
ago he sold a farm there. He bought of his father 30 years' ago. 
He produced a deed from Roger Morris to Wm. Hill dated 1771, 
and says his sisters Betsy and Deborah live on the farm. 

" Ebenezer Boyd says that he lives in Kent on Lot 5. 

"Noah Hill says that he is 74, and never heard of Astor's 
claims till he sent an agent to notify settlers of his claims, 15 
years ago. 

" Judah Kelh' says he lived on Lot 6, 46 years and never 
heard of Astor's claims. 

" Tho. Lownsbury says he is 54, and has a farm on Lot 5. 

"Benjamin Cole says he is 58, and owns a farm on Lot 5, 
-which he had from his father, who had it from his father Elisha 
Cole. Says he has two brothers Levi and Joseph. 

"Col. Tho. Barclay says that he knew Beverly Robinson, 
and that he lived in New York till 1764 or 5, and that he then 
went to the Highlands and lived there till 1779 and afterwards 
■went to England. Roger Morris also had a cottage on his lands 
where he often went to look after his rents. He resided in 
New York and went to England in 17S2. 

" Hon. Egbert Benson, says that when returning from Con- 
gress in 17S4 he stopped at the house of Gov. Wm. Livingston 
at Eliziibethtown, and that he was shown by him the marriage 
settlement and deeds. He also says that he was a member of 

' Joseph Jlen-itt. 



196 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

the Legislature and drew the bill of Attainder and at that time 
he had never heard of the marriage settlement. 

" Josiah Ogden Hoffman was called to testify as to the hand- 
writing of Gov. Livingston. 

" Egbert Benson and Henry Livingston were called as wit- 
nesses to prove that it was not customary to record leases, in 
cases of sale by lease and release.' 

On Saturday, November 10th, Mr. Van Buren began sum- 
ming np for the defense and was followed by Mr. Webster. 
Mr. Ogden began summing up for the plaintiff and was followed 
by Mr. Emmett on Monday morning. 

The charge was given to the jury by Judge Thompson, and 
the jury, after retiring for deliberation, returned a verdict for 
the plaintiff. 

From this decision an appeal was taken to the Supreme Court 
of the United States. The case was duly considered by the 
venerable Chief Justice John Marshall, and his associate jus- 
tices, and the judgment sustained. As to the question whether 
the plaintiff should be requested to pay for the improvements 
made upon the lands, the court decided in the negative, stating 
" that the principle that a person should be required to pay 
for improvements made upon his land without his consent, is 
one that this Court is not prepared to admit." 

While these cases were pending an act was passed " to revive 
and amend the Act to extinguish the claim of John Jacob Astor, 
and to quiet the possession of certain lands in Putnam and 
Dutchess Counties." This act, which was passed April i9th, 
1828, revived the act of 1827, and allowed thirty days for the 
acceptance of the terms proposed in that act. It also made it 
the duty of the attorney general to obtain the decision of the 
Supreme Court as to whether the improvements on the lands 
were to be paid for, and provided that Astor and his associates 
should not be entitled to a verdict unless it could be shown 
that all the right and title of Mary Morris and her children was 
duly vested in Astor and the other claimants. The provisions 
of this act were accepted and an instrument for that purpose 
was duly executed, and in 1828 all the right, title and interest 

' Great stress was laid by the lawyers for the defense uiion the fact, that 
although a lease for one whole year is mentioned in the trust deed of the mar- 
riage settlement of JIary Morris, yet it was not recorded, nor could the original 
be found. 



GENERAL BISTORT. 197 

of Astor and his associates in the lands in question were duly 
transferred to the State by the following deed: 

"This Indenture, made the first day of May in the year of 
our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty- eight between 
John Jacob Astor, of Hoboken in the County of Bergen and 
State of New Jersey, Esquire, and Sarah his wife of the first 
part, TheodosiiTS Fowler of Perth Amboy in the State of New 
Jersey Esquire and Maria his wife of the second part, Cad- 
■wallader D. Golden, of the City of New York Esquire, and 
Maria his wife of the third part, Cornelius I. Bogert of the town 
of Jamaica in the county of Queens, and State of New- York, 
Esquire, and Susannah his wife of the fourth part, and the 
People of the State of New York of the fifth part." 

The deed, which is of great length, goes on to recite the facts 
that Mary Philipse was the original owner of the lands; that 
a deed of marriage settlement was made in 17oS, which is given 
in fnll; that the marriage with Roger Morris was solemnized, 
and describing the various lots of land, showed their descent 
to the children of Mary Morris and their sale to John Jacob 
Astor, and mentioned the death of Roger Morris in 1795, and of 
his wife July 18th, 1825. and then proceeds as follows: 

"And Whereas, by sundry mesne conveyances, the said 
Theodosius Fowler party hereto of the second part hath become 
and is now lawfully seized in and entitled in fee simple to two 
equal undivided fifth parts of one equal undivided eighth part 
of all the said lands tenements and hereditaments, with the ap- 
purtenances so as aforesaid granted and conveyed by the said 
Thomas Cowper Hincks and Johanna his wife Maria Morris and 
Henry Gage Morris to the said John Jacob Astor, And Where- 
as, the said Cadwallader D. Golden, party hereto of the third 
part, by sundry mesne conveyances, hath become and 
now is lawfully seized in and entitled in fee simple 
to one equal undivided half of one fifth of one eighth 
part of all the said lands tenements and heredita- 
ments with the appurtenances so as aforesaid granted 
and conveyed by the said Thomas Cowper Hincks and 
Johanna his wife Maria Morris and Henry Gage Morris, to the 
said John Jacob Astor, And Whereas the said Cornelius I. 
Bogert, party hereto of the fourth part by sundry mesne con- 
veyances, hath become and now is lawfully seized in and en- 
titled in fee sr.nple to one equal undivided half of one fifth of 



198 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

one eighth of all the said lands, tenements and hereditaments 
with the appurtenances so as aforesaid granted and conveyed 
by the saicl Thomas Cowper Hincks and Johanna his wife, Maria 
Morris and Henry Gage Morris, to the said John Jacob Astor, 
And Whereas, the said John Jacob Astor, now holds and retains 
in fee simple three equal undivided quarter parts and one equal 
undivided eighth part and two equal undivided lifth parts of 
one eighth of the whole of the said lands, tenements, and 
hereditaments, with the appurtenances so as aforesaid granted 
and conveyed to him by the said Thomas Cowper Hincks and 
Johanna his wife, Maria Morris and Henry Gage Morris. Now 
this Indenture Witnesseth, that the said parties of the first, 
second, third and fourth parts respectively for and in consid- 
eration of ten dollars to them in hand paid, the receipt whereof 
is hereby acknowledged, and in compliance with the terms and 
provisions of the Act of the Legislature of the State of New 
York passed the sixteenth day of April, in the year one thous- 
and eight hundred and twenty-seven entitled " An Act to ex- 
tinguish the claim of John Jacob Astor and others, and to quiet 
the possession of certain lands in the counties of Patnam and 
Dutchess "' and the act of the said Legislature passed the nine- 
teenth day of April in the year one thousand eight hundred 
and twenty-eight entitled ''An Act to revive and amend an act 
entitled ' an act to extinguish the claim of John Jacob Astor 
and others, and to quiet the possession of certain lands in the 
counties of Putnam and Dutchess' passed April 16th, 1827." 
Have Granted, bargained, sold, aliened, released and conveyed 
and by these presents do grant, bargain, sell, alien, release and 
convey unto the people of the State of New York, and their suc- 
cessors and assigns forever, all those certain lands in the counties 
of Putnam and Dutchess, heretofore sold by the people of this 
State as forfeited by the attainder of Roger Morris and Mary 
his wife and which lands are more particularly described in a 
conveyance of marriage settlement made the fourteenth day of 
January, one thousand seven hundred and fifty-eight, by and 
between Mary Philipse of the first part Major Roger Morris of 
the second part and Johanna Philipse and Beverly Robinson of 
the third part, and recorded in the office of the Secretary of 
this State, on the eleventh day of April, seventeen hundred and 
eighty seven being the same instrument or deed of marriage 
settlement which is herein set forth and recited, a^by reference 



GENERAL HISTORY. 199 

to the boundaries and description of said lands in said deed of 
marriage settlement, will fully and at large appear. Together 
with all and singular, the houses, buildings, improvements, 
hereditaments and appurtenances thereto belonging or in any 
wise appertaining and also all the right, title, interest, estate, 
property, dower right or title of dower, claim and demand in 
Law of Equity of them the said parties of the first, second, 
third and fourth parts, or any or either of them of in or to the 
said lands or premises or any part thereof, with the appurte- 
nances, and the reversion and reversions, remainder and 
remainders, rents, issues and profits thereof, and of every part 
and parcel thereof And Also all the right title, interest, claim 
and demand in Law of Equity, which now is or heretofore has 
been of the heirs children and issue of the said Roger Morris 
and his wife Mary, of in and to the land, tenements and prem- 
ises aforesaid subject nevertheless, to the power in the said deed 
of marriage settlement contained and reserved, whereby the said 
Eoger Morris and Mary his wife, were authorized to sell and 
convey in fee simple any part of said lands, not exceeding 
in all the value of three thousand pounds, and excepting 
and reserving in this conveyance, the lands which were lawfully 
sold and conveyed by the said Roger Morris and Mary his wife, 
xmder and by virtue of said power, to have and to hold the said- 
lands, tenements, hereditaments and premises hereby granted, 
with the appurtenances, unto the people of the State of New 
York and their successors and assigns, to the only proper use, 
benefit and behoof of the people of the state of New York, and 
their successors and assigns forever: And the said .John Jacob 
Astor, as party hereto of the first part, the said Theodosius 
Fowler, as party hereto of the second part, the said Cadwalla- 
der D. Golden, as party hereto of the third part, and the said 
Cornelius I. Bogert, as party hereto of the fourth part, do 
severally and for their respective heirs, executors and adminis- 
trators, hereby covenant to and with the people of the State of 
New York, and their successors and assigns, that the above 
bargained premises, with the ai^purtenances in the quiet and 
peaceable possession and enjoyment of the people of the State 
of New York, and their successors and assigns against all 
and every person or persons, lawfully claiming or to claim, by, 
through, or under them the said John Jacob Astor, Theodosius 
Fowler, Cadwallacler D. Colden and Cornelius I. Bogert, or any 



200 HISTORY OF PUT>^\M COTTNTY. 

or either of them, thev the said John Jacob Astor, Theodosius 
Fowler, Cadwallader D. Golden, and Cornelius I. Bogert and 
their respective heirs, executors and administrators shall and 
will warrant and forever defend, and the said John Jacob 
Astor, as party hereto of the first part, the said Theodosius 
Fowler, as party hereto of the second part, the said Cadwalla- 
der D. Colden, as party hereto of the third part, and the said 
Cornelius I. Bogert, as party hereto of the fourth part, do sev- 
erally and for their respective heirs and administrators, hereby 
covenant to and with the people of the State of New York, and 
their successors and assigns that they, the said John Jacob 
Astor, Theodosius Fowler, Cadwallader D. Colden and Cor- 
nelius I. Bogert, and their respective heirs, executors and ad- 
ministrators, shall and will forever warrant and defend, the 
people of the State of New York, and all and every person or 
persons who has or have derived, or who shall derive title from 
the people of this State, against any claim at Law or in equity 
of the heirs children and issue of Roger Morris and Mary his 
wife, and of every person, claiming or to claim under them or 
either of them of in or to the said premises, lands and tene- 
ments or any part thereof The covenants herein contained are 
to be deemed and construed as several and not joint, that is to 
say: each of the said John Jacob Astor, Theodosius Fowler, 
Cadwallader D. Colden and Cornelius I. Bogert, covenants for 
and in relation to his own share or proportion of said lands 
and premises and not for the other or others of them. 

"In Witness Whereof the said parties of the first part, of 
the second part, of the third part and of the fourth part have 
hereto set their hands and seals, the day and year first above 
written. 

"JoHK- Jacob Astok. (L. S.) 

"Sarah Astor. (L. S.) 

"Theod. Fowler. (L. S.) 

"Maria Fowler. (L. S.) 

" Cadwallader D.CoLDEX. (L. S.) 
" Maria CoLDEx. (L. S.) 

"Cornelius I. Bogert. (L. S.) 
"Susan Bogekt. (L. S.)'" 

At the conclusion of the suits, an act was passed, April oth, 
1832, "Authorizing and directing the final settlement of ihe 



GiiNERAX HISTORY. 201 

claims of Jolin Jacob Astor against this State; " and according 
to its provisions, stock certiiicates, to the amount of §450,000, 
Avith interest, were issued and paid to Astor, who thereupon 
executed proper discharges to the j^eople of the State, and to 
the defendants, James Carver, Samuel Kelly and Nathaniel 
Crane, in satisfaction of judgment, and the case that had 
troubled Putnam county and the State so long, came to a final 
end. 



CHAPTER XIV. 

PUTNAM COUNTY DURING THE CIVIL WAR. 

REVISED BY GEN. WILLIAM H. MORRIS. 

THE files of the local newspapers give the true history of 
the times, and present a fair picture of passing events. 

January 19th, 1861. "Col. Ryder, of Peekskill has notified 
his companies of militia to prepare for active service and to 
secure the requisite supply of ammunition." 

Meetings of citizens in various villages of the county were 
reported. A flag raising on the farm of S. K. Ferris. A public 
meeting at Red Mills, at which Leonard Clift was chairman, 
was held April 26th. 

"Military matters in Putnam Co.: Head Quarters of the 
Engineer Co., ]8th Regt., Cold Spring, April 22d. The follow- 
ing volunteers have joined the Engineer Corps since orders were 
issued by Col. James Ryder, and recruited by Capt. Sylvester B. 
Truesdell, at Cold Spring : Albert N. Baxter, Lewis N. Squires, 
Isaac Ferris, Robinson Hopper, W.PI. Warren, Nelson Devoe, 
Benj. Van Tassel, Perry Ferris, James Caldwell, O. Smith, 
Charles Purdy,Wm. B. Bloomer, Wm. H. Odell, Michael Speed- 
ling, Orin B. Nelson, Daniel Hopper, George Hopper, Albert 
Wright, Henry Brewer, Charles E. Turner, Henry Dore, 
Chauncey Garrison, Charles Barton, Edward Sweeney, Charles 
Rogers, Isaac Van Tassel." 

" April 22d. The old members of the Corps number about 20 
besides the Captain. We hear that the members of the Corps at 
Carmel are astir and have enrolled 20 volunteers, who will be 
ready at the call of the Colonel." 

"May 11th. Carmel Volunteers. On last Monday five men 
left this village for New York to join the 2nd Regt., Scott's 
Life Guards, commanded by Col. J. H. Hobart AVard. Their 



GENERAL HISTORY. 203 

names are Willis Norris, Joseph Robinson, Isaac Lockwood, 
Francis Gregory and Crane Hopkins. Wm. Bailey, youngest 
son of Hon. B. Bailey, had previously joined. Joseph Shaw 
and John Cox had previously enlisted, the latter in a Brooklyn 
Eegiment.'' 

"Aug. 3rd, brings the sad news of Philo E. Lewis, of Patter- 
son, reported killed at Bull Run. Samuel Hart of Kent missing. 
Wm. F. Bailey and Jeremiah W. Hazen were sick in hospital 
at Alexandria, also Joseph Shaw." 

Liberal minded and patriotic ladies had forwarded various 
needful articles, which reached the camp of the 3Sth Regiment 
at Camp Scott, near Shuters Hill, July, 1861. 

"Aug. 17th. Samuel E. Hart reported a prisoner at Rich- 
mond. Capt. Jeremiah Sherwood, of Garrisons, who is attached 
to Col. Serrels Regt. visited Cold Spring and Brewster for the 
purpose of recruiting his Company. Ex Judge Parrott, of 
West Point Foundry Mill will furnish a battery of six rifled 
cannon, which is to accompany the Regiment. Capt. Sherwood 
has served in the artillery and infantry and was for three years 
in the regular army, and was stationed in California during the 
Mexican AVar." 

" Aug. 23d. Grand Union Meeting held at Brewster for the 
purpose of considering what measures were best for the citizens 
of this town to best support the Constitution and the Laws, 
and maintain the Government. 150 j^ersons present, Edward 
Howes Esq., Chairman; Tho. H. Reed, Secretary; Patriotic 
speeches made by A. B. Marvin Esq.; Edward Howes Esq.. and 
others. All party lines were obliterated, the grand inspiring 
idea being the Union, the whole Union, and nothing but the 
Union. A committee, consisting of F. E. Foster, Wm. T. Ga Nun 
and Tho. H. Reed, were appointed to draw up a Constitution. 
Wm. T. Ga Nun, Piatt Brush and Smith G. Hunt, were ap- 
pointed Town Central Committee, whose business it should be 
to look after the interests of the Union cause in our midst, and 
do what they could to enlist the sympathies of all in the cause 
of our Country and the suppression of Rebellion. A commit- 
tee of A. B. Marvin, Col. James Ryder and George Hine were 
appointed to report in relation to the organization of a military 
Co. in our town to be called the Home Guards. The subject of 
raising a fund for the support of the families of volunteers, was 
favorably discussed and Jarvis Pugsley who that day enlisted 



204 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COr>'^TY. 

was assured that his family should be well cared for during his 
absence. * * * * 

Sept. 7th the following advertisement appeared: 

" PUTNAM GCTARDS. 

" This Company is about being organized for the war, under 
the command of Capt. John Hazen, late of the 71st Regt. IST. Y. 
State Militia; to be composed entirely of men from Putnam 
County. Those wishing to enlist can do so by giving their 
names to the Captain at Brewster's Station, "N". T." 

An advertisement also appeared announcing that Colonel Ser- 
rel's Regiment of engineers and artisans had been accepted, and 
that 100 able men were wanted at the recruiting office at. Gar- 
risons. 

Sept. 7th. "County Mass Meeting, at Carmel, Hon. John 
Garrison, Chairman; John Hopkins, David Kent, James Cole, 
Samuel Kent, Edward Howes, Leonard D. Cliff, Vice Presidents; 
Tho. H. Reed and Joseph Strang, Secretaries. Judge Garrison 
on taking the chair, thanked the convention, for the honor, and 
said ' I have voted the Democ -atic ticket for forty years, and 
last fall I voted for John C. Breckenridge, but I thank God that 
I lost my vote, and am prond to stand here with my fellow citi- 
zens of all i^arties, to ground our party weapons, and join in 
battling for the welfare of our common country.' Tho. H. Reed, 
Edward Howes, Samuel Kent, Isaac Lounsbury, John Cole, 
George Ludington, Henry W. Belcher, Samuel A. Townsend 
and A. S. Van Duzer were appointed delegates to attend the 
People's Union State Convention, at Syracuse. 

" Resolved that it is the duty of every patriotic citizen to 
favor a vigorous prosecution of the war for the preservation of 
the Union; ignoring all political parties and party creeds, as 
embarrassing and dangerous until after the war is over.'" 

" Patriotic resolutions were passed at the Republican County 
Convention." 

"Wm. F. Bailey, Brigade Clerk, Sth Brigade, returns thanks 
to the ladies for the liberal donation of a uniform, on the occa- 
sion of his transfer from Co. D., 38th Regt., to a position of 
trust in the Sth Brigade." 

"Sept. 21st. We learn that recruiting officers in this County 
are meeting with flattering success. Quatter Master Sears has 
quite a number enlisted. Capt. Hazen is daily adding to his 



GENERAL HISTORY. 205 

list and Mr. A. W. Mattice, who only exhibited hi.s authority 
to recruit men, on the 7th, has from that day to the ISth, re- 
cruited 11 men. He is enlisting for Col. Dunham's Regiment." 

A. W. Mattice announces that "an exclusive Putnam Co. 
Company is now being recruited at Carrael, and that the Com- 
pany has the privilege of selecting their own officers." 

" Sept. 2Sth, A. W. Mattice has enlisted 23 men, for a Com- 
pany to be called Putnam Rifles." 

" Grand Mass Meeting at Putnam Valley, held at Lake Os- 
cawana House. Wm. C. Lickley, Pres. The meeting was ad- 
dressed by Hon. Benj. Bailey." 

"Oct. oth, Capt. Mattice has met with unequalled success. 
He had the names of 26 men registered on the Company Roll on 
last Tuesday night. George H. Lewis, Daniel F. Ferguson, 
Harvey H. Smalley, Henry B. Wixon, Joseph Sprague, Samuel 
Berry, Henry Wilson, Ira Conklin, Ozis Head, John Head, 
Hamilton Stewart, John M. Conklin, Francis Martin, John W. 
Gregory, Daniel Benjamin, Daniel D. Miller, Charles Tilford, 
Samuel Dexter, George Ganung, W. S. Horton, Daniel Miller,, 
Sylvester Tompkins, James Tiiford, David Hopkins, J. J. Light, 
Wm. J. Collins (drummer)." 

"Oct. 12th. Capt. A. W. Mattice took six more men to New 
York on the Oth. David Hopkins, John W. Gregory, Tho. 
Reordan, Cornelius Peirce, Reuben Sutton, Henry Wilkins." 

" Oct. 19th. The Putnam RiHes recruited by Capt. Mattice of 
this village now number 32 men, and have been accepted and 
mustered into the U. S. service, and designated as Co. K. of the 
Cameron Legion Regt., commanded by Col. Charles A. Dunham. 
At a Company election, A. W. Mattice was chosen Capt.; Cor- 
nelius H. Peirce, of Lake Mahopac, 1st Lieut. AV^hen the 
Captain left the camp at Saltersville, jS'. J., Harvey Wilson of 
Carmel was drilling the Company, as Orderly Seargent." 

About this time a Ladies' Relief Association was organized, of 
which Mrs. Selah Van Duzer was president; Mrs. James A. 
Watts, secretary; and Mrs. Foster Kelly, treasurer. The asso- 
ciation forwarded large quantities of necessary and useful 
articles to the soldiers and contributed greatly to their cora- 
fori. 

"Nov. 3Uth, Wm. F. Bailey, of Carmel, who held the Clerk- 
ship in the Sth Brigade returned home on Saturday last, and is 
authorized to raise a Company, of which he is to be Captain, 



206 IIISTOKY OF PUTXAM COUNTr. 

for the 3d Reo-l. Capt. Bailey will recruit his Company in this 
and adjacent counties, and as he was one of the first to enlist and 
has been in active, dangerous service, we wish him every suc- 
cess. His Company has been named the Weeks Guard, in 
honor of Hon. Chauncey R. Weeks, who has furnished much 
substantial aid." 

"Dec. 2d. A. W. Mattice, Lieut, of Co. I., 59th Regt., 
whose Company is now at Washington, is at home to obtain a few 
more recruits to raise his Company to the maximum number." 

''Dec. 2Sth. Twenty recruits have been obtained by Capt. 
Wm. F. Bailey whose Company, the Weeks Guard, is attached 
to Col. Jenkin's Regt. and is now in Camp at Sing Sing." 

"Jan. 24th, 1862. This Company is rapidly filling up. 40 
recruits have been mustered in. It has an efficient and power- 
ful patron in the person of Hon. Chauncey R. Weeks." 

"Feb. 15th. The report has arrived of the death of John C. 
Dean, of Carmel, a member of Co. J. 59th Regt., and son of 
Milton N. Dean. He died at Camp Sherman, D. C. Also re- 
port of the death of Sutton Ga Nun, a volunteer from Brewster." 

"March 27th. The Weeks Guard from this County and a 
portion of a Company from White Plains and another from 
Peekskill, in the 3d Regt. were consolidated, forming one Com- 
pany of 104 men, and on Friday last their Regt. was consoli- 
dated with the Warien Rifles, from Rockland County, and the 
Regiment is now the 95th K. Y. S. Y. Lieut. Wm. F. Bailey 
was promoted to be Captain of the consolidated company. It 
left for the seat of war last Saturday. Capt. Bailey on his 
hasty departure, requested us to tender his acknowledgement 
to.many gentlemen of the County to whose liberality he attri- 
butes his success." 

"March 22d. Sergeant Harvey Wilson, of the 95th Regt. is 
now on recruiting duty in the County." 

"It gives us pleasure to mention the brilliant conduct of 
young Mr. J. B. Yan Duzer, in the late engagement with the 
Merrimack, in Hampton Roads. Mr. Yan Duzer was Master's 
mate on board the Minnesota, and commanded the 3rd Division 
of Guns. His Division was especially mentioned as making the 
best line shots. Who will not agree with us that the worthy 
lady who presided over the Carmel Relief Society has reason to 
be proud of her patriotic sons." 

He was a son of Selah YanDazer; another son was Lieutenant 



GENERAL HISTORY. 207 

in a Cavalry Regt., while still another was an officer on board 
the steamer Mohawk. 

"June 7th. The Co. of Capt. Mattice and Pauldings Co. of 
Peekskill have been consolidated. Paulding was made Captain 
of the new Company on account of his having the greater num- 
ber of men,' and Capt. Mattice was made 1st Lieut. Capt. 
Paulding resigned, and Mattice was then commissioned as 
Captain of the Company, which was Co. I. 59th Regt., and is 
stationed at Tenallytown, D. C." 

" June 14th. The remains of Daniel' W. Travis, son of Jere- 
miah Travis of Kent Avere brought home and interred in the 
Baptist burying ground at Red Mills. He was a member of the 
13th Mich. Regt., to which state he went in 1S54, and he died at 
Nashville, Tenn.'" 

"June 30th. News of the death of Martin Baxter, son of 
Moses Baxter, of Putnam Valley. He was Orderly in Co. G., 
38th Regt., K. Y. V., and was killed at the battle of Seven 
Pines, and buried on the field." 

" July 19th. Joseph Shaw of Co. F., 38th Regt., is reported 
sick at David's Island." 

He died and was buried in the Presbyterian Cemetery, 
Carmel. 

"Aug. 2d, comes the report of the death of Lieut. Charles F. 
Van Duzer, who was killed at the battle of Gaines Mills, June 
27th." 

On the 16th of August, 1862, came the announcement of the 
draft made necessary to fill the wasted armies of the country. 
The ijeoi:)le of Southeast raised a fund of 82,600, as a town 
bounty fund, to be paid to volunteers. Capt. George H. Dean 
began recruiting and obtained six recruits in a week. He 
belonged to the 1st Batalion of Mounted Rifles, Col. C. C. 
Dodge. 

" Aug. 23rd. The people are aroused, 2 large public meetings 
were held at Cold Spring, Farmer" s Mills, Ludingtonville, Brew- 
ster, Carmel, Lake Mahopac, Red Mills and Tompkin's Cor- 
ners. A fund has been raised in the several towns for volun- 
teering. This County is required to raise two full Companies. 
160 men liave already enlisted." 

" Webster Smith, of Farmers Mills has sold his business and 
a company of men have bought his store and tavern, and he is 
now recruiting a Company for the war. He has already ob- 



■208 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

tained twelve men, in and around Farmer's Mills. He is just 
tlie man needed for the occasion, and deserves all the assist- 
ance that the loyal and patriotic citizens can give him." 

"A Special Town Meeting was held for the town of Carmel, 
at Lake Mahopac, on Aug. 21st, to vote a bounty of $100 for 
each volunteer. Out of 134 votes all but two were in favor." 

"Charles E. Benedict, late Editor of the Putnam Count)/ 
Courier^ has enlisted in an Orange County Regiment." 

He contracted camp fever in the service and returning home, 
died at his father's residence, at Warwick, Orange county, No- 
vember 1st, 1862. 

"Aug. 16th. War Meeting at Lake Mahopac; Leonard D. 
Clift, Chairman. An address was delivered by Rev. Henry 
Ward Beecher, who spoke with his unequaled eloquence. Pa- 
triotic resolutions were passed. C. H. Ludington, of New York, 
donated $500 to aid the cause of volunteering." 

" Aug. 30th. Kent in a patriotic blaze. We hear that 36 
volunteers have been obtained in that town, and as her quota 
under both calls is 45 men, only nine more are wanted to till 
it. Kent will be the banner town of Old Putnam. • George 
Ludington and j^ddison J. Hopkins are the enrolling officers." 

The following was the quota of each town under the first 
draft: 

Carmel 70 

Philipstown 141 

Kent 45 

Patterson 46 

Putnam Valley 49 

Southeast 73 

424 
"Sept. Gth. Kent filled her quota in eleven days. A com- 
pany of men bought out Webster Smith's store, tavern and 
property, at Farmer's Mills, and he is now a Ca];)tain, and with 
a large part of the volunteers, are on the route to Washington." 
"Sept. 13th. A large and enthusiastic meeting was held at 
Smalley's Hotel, Carmel; Hon. Chauncey Weeks, President. 
George Ludington offered a bounty of 8120, to every man who 
should enlist. In the evening another meeting was held in the 
Court House: Joseph Cole Esq., President. Another spirited 
meeting at Red Mills on last Wednesday niglir, and one at 



(tENEKal history. 209 

Towners Station last night. Another this afternoon at Lake 
Mahopac, and one will be held at tlie house of Daniel Drew, 
next Monday evening.'' 

" Anthony Wayne Guards, 135th Regt. The organization of 
this Regt. has been completed in a very short time; but two 
weeks was occupied in recruiting Co. Gf., Webster Smith, Cap- 
tain; Stephen Baker 1st. Lieut.; Charles F. Hazen 2nd. Lieut.; 
No. of men 101. The men fi*om Kent, Carmel and Southeast. 
Rev. BT. W. Smuller, of Carmel was appointed Chaplain.'' 

" Sept. 27th. List of killed and wounded in Co. I. 59th. Regt. 
Capt. Mattice, at the Battle of Antietam, Sept. 17th. Killed 
Pierce Miller, Edgar Sutton, J. S. D. Riker, Herman Wilson, 
George Sweet, Hamilton Stewart. Wounded, Harvey N. Wil- 
son, George Walters, Wm. N. Pratt, Edward Williams, Samuel 
N. Dexter, John Acker, Tho. Brady, Samuel Berry, Tho. Kirch, 
James L Light, James Martin, Andrew Proud, Henry B. Wixon, 
Daniel D. Wixon, Wm. W. Dean, Patrick Dorly, C. Cronk, 
Wm. Horton, Elias Tilford, Nelson Mead, Harvey Smalley." 

" Capt. Wm. F. Bailey was honorably discharged from the 
army, Aug. 31st 1862." 

"Jan. 16th, 1863. Webster Smith's Co., attached to 6th. 
Artillery Regt. The report has arrived of the death of AVm. 
Frost of Co. D. He was a young man from Patterson." 

" Feb. 24th. The Board of Supervisors of Putnam County, 
convened for the purpose of authorizing the collection of 
bounty money, paid by the various towns." 

"March 14th. Harvey N. Wilson, Orderly Sergeant of Co. 
J., 95th Regt., died in the General Hospital, Frederick, Mary- 
land, March 7th, of wounds received at Antietam. His remains 
were brought home and buried, in the Bai:)tist burying ground 
Carmel." 

Major-Gen. Couch, who commanded the 2d Army Cor^DS, of 
the xlrmy of the Potomac, was a native of the town of South- 
east. 

" May 2d, 1863. Jabez Robinson of Carmel, in Capt. Mat- 
tice' s Co., was wounded at Fair Oaks and lionorably dis- 
charged." 

" May 9th. Lieut. Charles F. Hazen died on Saturday last 
at Maryland Heights. He belonged to 6th N. Y. Artillery, 
and perished at the early age of 32. Ee was buried ar the Bap- 
tist bui'ving ground (^'arniel." 
It 



210 HISTORY OF PUTXA3I COUNTY. 

"Sept. 23d. Quota of each town for the draft ordered: 
Philipstown, 190; Southeast, 79; Carmel, 68; Putnam Valley 
38; Kent, 36; Patterson, 36." 

"Dec. 26th. Lieut. G. Doughty Hyatt, of Putnam Valley 
has been presented with a splendid sword." 

" May 14th, 1864. Quota of each town under draft of 1864: 
Philipstown, 72; Carmel, 45; Putnam Valley, 45." 

"Lieut. Horton R. Piatt, killed at Spottsylvania Court 
House, May 16th, 1864." 

"Special meeting of Supervisors, held July 28th, and bonds 
were issued to tlie amount of 875,000. These were sold at public 
auction and were bought by George Mortimer Belden, at 1 per 
cent premium. Bonds to the amount of §20,000 were afterwards 



"Nov. 5th. Jarvis Pugsley, who has served three years and 
been wounded, has been discharged." 

" Oscar Knapp of 4th Artillery, who has been in almost every 
battle and in one charge had his clothes perforated by several 
balls, has been discharged." 

" Jan. 3rd, 1865. Special town meeting in Patterson. Re- 
solved that every man who shall pay to a committee appointed 
for that purpose, the sum of $25, shall be secured from draft, 
and the Supervisor and Town Clerk were authorized to raise a 
sum necessary to supply the draft." 

"Jan. 28th; Hon. Robert P. Parrott, of West Point Foun- 
dry, has paid the taxes of all the widows and of the soldiers 
absent to the war, residing in Philipstown. This is but one of 
the many good acts flowing from his generous heart and kindly 
hand." 

The whole, number of credits since tlie establishment of the 
Provost Marshall's office at Tarrytown: Philipstown, 294; Put- 
nam Valley, 104; Carmel, 137; Southeast, 147; Kent, 80; Pat- 
terson, 88. 

The action of the Board of Supervisors was duly legalized 
by acts of the Legislature, and the debt thus contracted, was in 
a few years paid. 

From the information available at this late day it is impos- 
sible to give anything like a complete record of Putnam county 
volunteers. The following list has been prepared with great 
care and contains the names (so far as ascertained) of those en- 
listing from this county, with the regiments in which they 
served. 



GENERAL HISTORY. 211 

1st Regiment Mounted Ritles, Co. I:— Foster C. Carl, James 
McCollum, William H. Nixon, Stopplebaam. 

4th Regiment Heavy Artillery, Co. A:— Tho. D. ^ears, Capt.; 
Martim Y. B. Akin, Orderly; Henry W. Hayden, Sergeant; 
Oscar Knapp, Stephen D. Butler, Peter Carr, Lindon J.'Cowl, 
Zephaniah Denny, Wm. E. Doane, Silas Haviland, Geo. H. 
Hubbard, Merritt Washburn, Bernard McEnnaly, James Mc- 
Donald, Elisha Penny, Mills Reynolds, Leonard H. Secor, James 
P. Rogers, Levi Benedict, Obed P. Townsend, Herman H. Cole, 
Charles Bradley, John Sweetman, Capt., James P. Rogers, 
Lewis P. Rogers, Joseph Sprague, David H. Terrill, Elijah 
Wilson, Elbert Wilson, Geo. W. Wixon, James Wynn, Horace 
Eastwood, Norman Davis, James Morey, Ephraim Davis, John 
S. Trowbridge, McGlohlin. 

13oth Regiment', N.Y. S. V., Co. D:— Charles P. Crosby, Ser- 
j^eant; Sylvester Forkel, Wm. G. Barnes, James I. Turner, 
Josiah D. Baker, Ferris Barrett, Daniel Burch, Frederick But- 
ler, Solomon Carpenter, Clarence Cowl, Geo. W. Cowl, James 
H. Couch, Herman B. Crosby. Augustus Eastwood, Lathrop 
Eddy, William Frost, James E. Grant, Martin Needham, Eli 
R. Smith, Geo. P. Taylor, David Washburn, Henry Worden. 

135th Regiment, N. Y. S. Y., Co. G: Webster Smith, Capt.; 
Stephen Baker, 1st Lieut.; Charles F. Hazen, 2d Lieut.; Edward 
Bailey, Sergeant ; Seymour B. Phillips, Sergeant; Wm. S. 
Hadley, Sergeant; Hart Wright, Sergeant; James E. Lee, 
Sergeant; David Wixon, Corporal; Seth Contant, Corporal; 
Lewis G. Baldwin, Corporal; James Ostrander, Cori^oral; Walter 
S. Robson, Corporal; Michael McGarrick, Corp)oral; Petrus S. 
Halstead, Corporal; John S. Sherwood, Corporal; Wm. Ames, 
Jeremiah Austin, Isaac Barrett, A'incent Barrett, Richard S. 
Brooks, Dingee Barrett, Lorenzo Bacon, Gilbert D. Bailey, Joel 
Bates, AVm. Burns, Samuel A. Bailey, Franklin Bowdy, Alonzo 
€. Collins, Tho. L. Corbon, Samuel A. Coe, Myron Dingee, 
Alfred Dexter, Charles Davis, Philip W. Dexter, Geo. H. Davis, 
Leonard Dexter ; John De.xter, Francis H. Everett, Geo. W. Fo- 
shay, Joseph Fisher, John T. Fisher,Geo. W. Fisher, Charles Fo- 
shay, Josej)hFurguson, Elias L. Ferguson, Jeremiah Frost, Gil- 
bert Forman, James Galbreth. Bailey Gaming, Alonzo Ganung, 
Oliver H. Gay, Urban T. Housler, James T. Hart, Eli W. Han. 

'Formed as tlie l^oth Regiment of Infantry and converted into 6tli Regiment 
of Artillerv wliile at Baltimore. 



212 HISTORY OF PUTJ^fAM COUNTY. 

Henry H. Harris, Hiram Hitchcock, Joseph B. HutcMns, John 
C. Jordan, Horace Kirk, Albert Knapp, Wm. D. Light, Daniel T. 
Ludlow, Tho. Lyons, Robert G. Lee, Albert W. Lent, Elvin Mead, 
James McDonald, James Morrisroe, Lewis Martin, Joseph L(. 
Parker, John R. Parker, Isaac W. Parker, Horace Quick, Vin- 
cent Russel, James A. Rundle, Wm. Robinson, James Ritchie, 
Sandford Reynolds, Henry C. Reed, John L. Smalley, Alonzo 
B. Spencer, James K. Screder, Garret E. Smalley, Wm. H. 
Smith, Edwin Smith, Wm. Satterly, Joseph I. Smalley, Michael 
Supple, Dennis Sculley, Orman Smith, Wm. H. Tilford, James 
0. Trowbridge, Abraham B. Trowbridge, Edward Tilford, 
George Williams, Levi Williams, Henry Wildman, Silas Wil- 
liams, James T. Wright. 

8Sth Regiment, N. Y. S. V.: Jeremiah W. Hazen, Samuel T. 
Hart, Horace Bailey, Isaac Lockwood, Francis Gregory, Joseph 
Robinson, Joseph E. Shaw, Robert A. Shaw, Wm. Robinson, 
Thomas Washburn. Wra. F. Bailey. 

6th Regiment Artillery, N. Y. S. Y., Co. L: Sylvester B. 
Truesdell, Capt. ; Lewis L. Young, 1st Lieut.; Wm. G. Ferris,. 
2d Lieut.; Tompkins Minthorne, 1st Sergeant; Wm. R. Vree- 
denburg, 2d Sergeant; John McKechnie, 3d Sergeant; Wm. R. 
Bloomer, 4th Sergeant; Wm. Emmerson, 5th Sergeant; Alonzo 
Light, Corporal; Theodore McEwen, Corporal; Justus T. Crosby, 
Lieut.; James H. Prince, Corporal; Wm. P. Dykeman, Cor- 
poral; Harrison Crane, Corporal: Matthew Rack, Corporal; 
Theodore Lovelace, Corporal; John Hamilton. Corporal; Dennis 
Scully, John McGowan, Enoch Griffith, Jordan Ackerman, 
James Ritchie, Frank Everitt, Wm. Satterlee, Wm. C. Brewster, 
Sandford Reynolds, James Ashmond, Tho. Agnew, Wm. Bar- 
ton, James Barnes, James Britliffe, Martin Burton, Elijah Bal- 
lard, Geo. W. Bratton, Ferris Briggs, Gurnesy B. Banks, Fran- 
cis N. Booth, James Brown, Robert Cambel, Jameson Clark, 
Wm. Cubbitt, Francis Coxe, John Cambell, Fraz. G. Gauzler, 
John D. Crawford, Wm. Dobbs, John J. Davis, Geo. W. Den 
ney, John P. Daniels, John Jordan, Dingee Barrett, Geo. H. 
Davis, Charles Davis, Geo. E. Dean, Wm. Denike, Langdon R. 
Daniels, Charles Dykeman, Samuel Ehret, Isaac D. Finch, Perry 
Ferris, Harrison Ferris, Josiah Ferris, ]\lilton Ferris, Isaac Ferris, 
Tho. Flood, Hubert Fallon, Abraham Ferguson, David Frost, 
Lemuel French, Willis S. Goi'ham, Wm. Gilbert, John Jay Griffin, 
Svlvanns Haidit, Wm. Hilherton, Henry Horton, Edward 



GENERAL HISTOKY. 213 

Bailey, Jacob Tilford, Harrison Crane, James Ritcliie, Albert 
Hoton, Luke Higgins, Tho. Hamilton, Tho. Higgins, Alanson 
Hoyt, Joseph Hopkins, Edward Ireland. Richmond Ireland, John 
Jennings, Wni: H. Kimble, Charles Kimble, Andrew J. Light, 
Justus Lake, Coleman Light, John W. Light, Michael Mott, Da- 
vid J. Meeks, Dennis Mahony, Andrew Moody, Michael McGow- 
an, James McGan, Theodore Merritt, Gilbert Wright, Fred. R. 
Hall, Gilbert Bailey, Peter Halstead, Wm. S. Hadley, Joseph 
Bates, Alexander McQuillan, Joseph McLean, Tho. Newman, 
Robert Newman, Alexander Nelson, Nelson Odell, Hugh Plea- 
ven, James Queen, Wm. A. Russell, Wm. Rooney, Silas 
Smalley, Edward Sweeney, John Sweeney, John P. Shriver, 
James E. Smalley, Rowland Sprague, Seymour Townsend, Asa 
H. Thomas, James Turner, Elias Townsend, Warren C. Town- 
send, Darius Townsend, Isaac Van Tassel, Uriah Wallace, 
James W. Wallace, David B. Williams, John W. Weeks, 
Daniel Whaley, Frederick Warren, James Warren, Agustus 
Warren. Wm. H. Weeks, John White, Valentine Williams. 

6th Regiment Artillery, N. Y. S. V., Co. M: Donaldson 
Effingham, 2d Lieut. 

13th Regiment, N. Y. S. V., Co. C: Stephen Ray. 
. 59th Regiment, N. Y. S. V., Co. I: Gilbert Reed, Alexander 
G. Smith, Nelson Mead, John C. Dean. 

95th Regiment, N. Y. S. V., Co. K: Elbert F. Bailey, Ser- 
geant; Zephaniah Dakins. jr., Jacob Brown, Tho. Booth,. 
Harvey Wilson, Sergeant; John S. Boyd, Patrick Burns, John 
Barret, Jeremiah Curry, Oliver Daniels, John P. Daniels, Geo. 
W. Dakins, John M. Griffin, Henry Horton, Lewis Latham, 
Charles W. Leveridge, Wm. H. Miller, John J. Miller, Charles 
H. Miller, Abraham B. Travvis, Nathaniel J. Travvis, Stephen 
Worden, John Hilliker, Wm. H. Heady, W. H. Kirk, Alvah 
Kirk, John Kruly, Henry Otis, Samuel Rhodes, Silas Scickler, 
Tho. Stimson, David W. Travvis, Charles H. Travvis, Patrick 
Tracy, Peter Worden, Joshua B. Young. 

Of Co. K., 05th Regiment, Capt. William F. Bailey was com- 
mander. The company was a consolidated one composed of 
parts of companies from this coiinty and from Westchester and 
Rockland. 

In regiments of other States: Francis A. Bush, -iTth Iowa 
Regiment; Byron Crosby, 7th Conn. Regiment; Francis O. 
Myers, 54th Mass. Regiment: John Scruzar, Duryea's Zouaves: 



214 HISTORY OF PUTXAM COUNTY. 

Wra. W. Newman, 7th Conn. Regiment; Chauncey Philips, 
29th Conn. Regiment; Samuel Berry, 16th U. S. Infantry; John 
Davis, 7th Conn. Regiment; Frank Wells, Capt. 13th Conn. 
Regiment; Harvey Newell; Lieut. F. Burdick, killed in action; 
Daniel J. D. Crane, buried at Milltown. 7th Conn. Regiment; 
James Ballard, James Howard, John C. Swords, Henry Wil- 
liams. SSth Ind. Regiment: Samuel R. Burch, John M. 
Sloane, Brush Trowbridge, Sergeant Hart. 11th Penn. 
Regiment: George H. Crosby, Wm. H. Sweetman. 

Among those who distinguished themselves in the service of 
their country in the Rebellion the following are deserving of 
special notice: 

GouvERNEUK Kemblk Warren was born at the village of 
Cold Spring, January Sth, 1830, and was graduated from the 
Military Academy and promoted to the rank of brevet 2d lieu- 
tenant in the Corps of Topographical Engineers July 1st, 1850. 
At the breaking out of the Civil War he was mustered into ser- 
vice May 14th, 1861, as lieutenant-colonel of the Fifth New York 
Volunteers. 

" General Warren was promoted successively from the grade 
of Lieutenant to that of Lieutenant-Colonel, Corps of Engineers, 
and Major General, U. S. Volunteers. He received the brevets, 
of Lieutenant Colonel, U. S. Army, 'for gallant and meritorious 
services at the battle of Gaines' Mill,' Va., 1862; Colonel, V. S. 
Array, ' for gallant and meritorious services at the battle of 
Gettysburg,' Pa., 1863; Brigadier General, U. S. Army, *for 
gallant and meritorious services at the battle of Bristoe Station,' 
1865; and Major General, U. S. Army, 'for gallant and meri- 
torious services in the field during the Rebelion,' 1865." 

After the close of the war and up to the time of his death 
General Warren distinguished himself in various capacities in 
the civil branches of his profession. The Corps order under 
General Wright, announcing his death, says: 

" In scientific investigations General Warren had few supe- 
riors; and his elaborate reports on some of the most important 
works which have been confided to the Corps of Engineers are 
among the most valuable contributions to its literature. 

" In the field, in the late civil war, he was a brave and ener- 
getic officer, and in the high command to which he attained by 
his patriotic valor and skill he merited the admiration of the 
army and the applause of his country. 



GENERAL IIISTOIIV. 215 

" He was kind and considerate in all the relations of life, and 
his family in its aflliction will have the hearty sympathy of the 
Corps of Engineers." 

General Warren died at Newport, R. I., August Sth, 1SS2. 

Stephen Bakeu, son of Daniel and Eunice Nobby, was born 
in the town of Southeast, December 24th, 1835. His education 
was such as the hamlet of Milltown could afford. At the age 
of twenty-one years, during the excitement of slavery exten- 
sion, he emigrated to Kansas but afterward located at Omaha, 
Neb. Here he engaged in the transportation of supplies to 
Fort Kerney and Omaha Reserve. When gold was discovered 
in Colorado, Mr. Baker was the first to prospect the Rocky 
Mountains, in the regions of Pike's Peak, Long s Peak, South 
Park and Middle Park. All the plains from the Missouri to 
the mountains at this time were occupied by the Arapahoe, 
Cheyenne, Comanche, Apache, Sioux and Pawnee Indians. In 
consequence of failing health, Mr. Baker left the mountains 
and returned to his native town, where he soon recovered. 

As a soldier, Stephen Baker has done gallant service for his 
country. He enlisted as first lieutenant, in Co. G, 135th N. Y. 
Vol. Regiment, which was converted into the 6th N. Y. Vol. 
Artillery and defended Harper's Ferry and Maryland Heights 
in the winter of 1863. The next June he joined the Army of 
the Potomac and participated in its marches, retreats, many 
battles and victories until the final surrender of the Army of 
Virginia, under General Lee, at Appomattox. Some of the 
battles in which he fought were South Mountain, Wapping 
Heights, Battle of the Wilderness, Po River, Chestnut Ridge, 
Spottsylvanin, North Anna, Bethesda Church, Mechanicsville 
Road and Petersburg. Through the recommendation of supe- 
riors, he was promoted, for services in the field, and with his 
regiment, joined General Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley, 
where he remained till after the Battle of Cedar Creek. Being 
ordered to the Army of the James, his regiment p)articipated in 
preventing the Rebel ironclads from breaking through obstruc- 
tions and cutting off the base of supplie.s at City Point He 
was promoted a second time, in' 1864, to the rank of major lieu- 
tenant-colonel, and remained in service after the general muster 
out of the Army of the Potomac. The 6th, 10th, and 13th 
New York Artillery Regiments, numbering 1,875 men, being 
consolidated into the 6th, he was made colonel of this regiment 



216 HISTORY OF PUTXAM COUNTY. 

and placed in command at Petersburg. At the close of the war. 
in 1865, he was mustered out of the service. 

Again he returned to his native town and engaged in tlie 
lumber and feed business until 1875, when he ventured into the 
manufacturing of hats, which ended in failure, in 1879. 

Mr. Baker was member of Assembly, from Putnam county, 
for the years of 1866 and 1867. He has held the position of 
inspector of customs, in New York city, since 1880. 

General William Hopkins Morris' is the son of General 
George P. Morris, author of " Woodman, Spare that Tree,"' 
whose former country seat, Undercliff, is situated on the east 
bank of the Hudson, near the village of Cold Spring. The 
grounds consist of thirty-live acres, and are adorned with lofty 
shade trees, nearly all of which were planted by him. The 
mansion is massive in its architecture and commands from its 
windows views of West Point, Cro Nest, and Newburgh Bay. 
Lossing. the historian, calls Undercliff " The Gem of the Hud- 
son." 

Gen. George P. Morris resided here for more than half his 
life time, and many of his most beautiful and popular poems 
were suggested by the enchanting surroundings of this roman- 
tic place. It was while living here that he began the successful 
weekly paper entitled " The National Press, a Journal for 
Home," but he changed the name after a few issues, to that of 
"The Home Journal," the title which it still bears. After a 
short time he was induced to take as a partner and joint editor, 
Mr. N. P. Willis, and Morris & Willis continued the editors 
and proprietors of that paper during the remainder of their 
lives. 

Gen. George P. Morris married Mary Worthing, daughter of 
George F. Hopkins, of New York city, and had by her one son, 
William, and two daughters, Ida and Georgiana. 

His son, William Hopkins Morris, was born in New York 
city, April 22d,1827. He was graduated from theWest Point Mili- 
tary Academy, in June, 1851, and entered the army as brevet 2d 
lieutenant in the 2d Regiment of Infantry. He was ordered to 
Fort Yuma, California, where he served under Major Heintzel- 
man. Ill health, caused by the severity of the climate, induced 
liini to resign. Returning to New York, he engaged in literary 
pursuits. On the breaking out of the war he entered the vol- 

' Tlie following sketch of General Morris was prepared by F. L. Beers. 




'^^^r-T-^l-^ 




GENERAL IIISTOKY. 217 

nnteer army as an assistant adjutant general, with the rank of 
captain, and vvas assigned to duty as chief of staff to Gen. John 
J. Peck, and served as such through the Peninsular Campaign, 
under McClellan, in the Army of the Potomac, and was re- 
peatedly mentioned for gallant services by General Peck in his 
official reports of battles. At the close of that campaign. Cap- 
tain Morris was elected colonel of the 135th Regt. N. Y. Volunteer 
Infantry, raised in the counties of Putnam, Westchester and 
Rockland, and organized by Col. Lewis G. Morris, of Morri- 
sania. Col. William H. Morris took conamand, and the regi- 
ment was ordered to the front. On its way it was stopped at 
Baltimore. In six weeks time the regiment was so well in- 
structed and drilled that it was chosen by General Wool from 
among some dozen regiments, for the honor of conversion into 
artillery, and became the 6th Regiment of N. Y. Artillery, 
whose brilliant services in the field made it one of the most 
famous regiments of the Grand Army of the Potomac. 

Colonel Morris was given the command of Fort McHenry, at 
Baltimore, and his regiment added to its garrison. Soon after 
he was ordered to Harper's Ferry. While here he was pro- 
moted to the rank of brigadier general and placed in charge of 
Maryland Heights Avirh a force consisting of regiments of in- 
fantry and cavalry, and batteries of heavy guns. Durino- the 
advance of Lee, Maryland Heights were for some days cut off 
from all communication with supports, except by Hag signals, 
and as the great Southern general advanced, the prospect of de- 
struction seemed inevitable; but one bright morning the blue 
coats of the Army of the Potomac were reported by the signal 
officer, and then the suspense was relieved. Maryland Heights 
were abandoned by the Union troops, and General Morris was 
ordered to join the Army of the Potomac and his command be- 
came a part of the 3d Army Corps. When the Army of the 
Potomac was reorganized, the 3d Corps was divided, and a part 
was ordered to the 2d CorjDS, and the rest, including General 
Morris' brigade, joined the Gth Army Corps, commanded b}- 
General Sedgwick. During his service in this renowned corps, 
under Gen. U. S. Grant, General Morris' brigade, which was 
composed of the lOGrh N. Y., lolst N. Y., 14th N. J., STth 
Penn., and lOth Vt. Regiments of Infantry, made for itself a 
record unexcelled foi- brilliancy. Wliile in this corps General 
Morris was severely wounded in tlie Battle of the Wilderness, 



218 HISTORY OF PUTXAM COUNTY. 

and for his "gallant and meritorious services" in that great 
battle, he had conferred upon him the rank of brevet major 
general by the president of the United States. After the war, 
having been honorably mustered out of service, General Morris 
returned to Undercliff, his home, and resided there, during 
which time he married Kate, daughter of Dr. Adrian K. Hoff- 
man, of Westchester county, and had by her one son, whom he 
named George Philip Morris, after the poet. 

General Morris represented the county of Putnam in the 
Constitutional Convention of 1867, was chief of ordnance and 
inspector general of the State of New York, in the National 
Guards. He is the author of the "System of Tactics for In- 
fantry " armed with breech-loading or magazine rifles. 

We cannot close this sketch without alluding to the deep 
friendship which existed between General Morris and Gen. G. 
K. Warren, of Cold Spring. It began in childhood and in- 
creased in strength with every year of their lives. Well may 
this village be proud of having contributed two distinguished 
general officei'S to the grandest of all our armies, the Army of 
the Potomac. 



CHAPTER XV. 

THE MILITIA OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 
BY GEN. JAMES RYDER. 

THE first account we have of any organization of the militia 
is from an order signed by Col. John Field to Lieut. 
Jonathan Crane in 1777, to wit: "You are hereby a^ipointed a 
Commandant of the Guard for the protection of the inhabitants 
in this quarter agreeable to orders Late rec"'^ from our Gov"'. 
You are in person to call upon the jiersons whose names are In- 
serted in the annexe"^ List this day to enter the service under 
your Command You are to Rendezvous this evening at the house 
of Major Mott when you will receive further orders. You will 
make Return to me of the names of any such person as may 
Neglect or refuse to put themselves under your Command. 
" Given under my hand this Sth day of October, 1777. 

"John Field, Colo. 
"To Lieut. Jonathan Crane." 

In 1786 Jonathan Crane was commissioned " captain No. 3 of 
a company in the Regiment of the Militia of the County of 
Dutchess of which William Pearce, Esq., is Lieutenant Colonel 
Commandant." Commission signed by Geo. Clinton, Governor. 

In 1793, Jonathan Crane, Esq., was commissioned second 
major of a regiment of militia in the county of Dutchess where- 
of Samuel Augustus Barker was lieutenant colonel command- 
ant. 

April 2.jtli, 1797. Jonathan Crane, Esq., was commissioned by 
Gov. John Jay as lieutenant colonel commandant of a regiment 
of militia in tlie county of Dutchess. 

In ISOS, Anson Crane was commissioned by Gov. Daniel D. 
Tompkins captain of a company in the regiment of militia in 



220 HISTORY OF PUTXAil COUNTY. 

the county of Dutchess whereof Joseph C. Field, Esq., was 
lieutenant colonel commandant. 

By an act of Congress passed in 1792 for the organization of 
the militia, the commanding officer of each regiment was a 
lieutenant colonel commandant, which office was continued till 
1818 when the organization of regiments was as before com- 
manded by a colonel; with a lieutenant colonel and major as 
field officers. This accounts for the lieutenant colonel com- 
mandants between Col. John Field and Col. Reuben D. Barnum. 
That part of the present county of Putnam consisting of South- 
east and Patterson was in the bounds of the 35th Regiment, 
and six of the eight companies in the regimental district were 
in the towns mentioned. 

The Monkeytown Company held its company trainings near 
where the milk factory now stands. The captains of this com- 
pany from time to time were Samuel Ryder, Gilbert Reynolds. 
Stephen Ryder, Orrin B. Crane, Thatcher H. Theall and Isaac 
A. Crane. 

The ^SofZo???. Company trained at Sodom Corners, now South- 
east Center. Among its captains were Orrin Richards, Jacob 
O. Howes, and Reuben B. Lawrence. 

The MilUown Company's headquarters were at Mill town, and 
some of its officers were Joseph Palmer, Piatt Baldwin, Albert 
Brush, William F. Fowler, H. K. Beebe and Isaac Yolney 
Higgins. 

The Elm Tree Company held its comj^any trainings at a tavern 
near the "big elm," kej^t by Ca^Dt. Daniel Reed. Some of its 
officers were Daniel Reed, Elijah Barnum, Patterson Barnum, 
Orlando P. Barnum and Francis A. Seeley. 

From a letter written by Col. Nathan Pearce in 1879, he says: 
" The next company paraded at Haviland Corner. It was com- 
posed of the Eastern part of Patterson and south eastern part 
of Pawling so as to include the Slocums. The most prominent 
Captain was Asa Akin." 

The Sixth Comj^any paraded at Harry Hayt's in West Pat- 
terson including the rest of the town of Patterson. Their for- 
mer captains were Dean, Smith, Pugsley, Squires and Samuel 
C. Reynolds. 

The Serenih Company paraded at Hurd's Corner, and the 
Eighth at Jackson Wing's, but they were out of the county. 



GKXEKAL HISTORY. 221 

The 35th Regiment was in the 30th Brigade and 7th Division. 
General Jacob L. Scofield was the last brigadier general of the 
brigade at the time of its disbandment in 1847. He died 
March 27th, 1SS6, at Fishkill, in the 92d year of his age. 

Major General John Brush of Poughkeepsie was commandant 
of the Division as early as 1824, and to the disbandment, which 
took place in consequence of a change in the system. 

Regimental parades of the 35th were held at Haviland Corner, 
now Aiken Corner, as far back as to the days of Col. Crane and 
to the last meetings. 

The succession of colonels and commanding officers as nearly 
as can be ascertained were: John Field, of Southeast, 1777; 
William Pearce of Pawling, 1786; Samuel Augustus Barker, 

1793; Burton, 1795 (By Gen. Orders); Jonathan Crane, 

Southeast, 1797; Joseph C. Field, Southeast, 1808; Isaac Cros- 
by, Southeast; Hart Weed, Southeast. 1815; Samuel Allen; 
JohnT. Hotchkiss; Reuben D. Barnum, Southeast, 1821; Nathan 
Pearce, Pawling. 1823 (died July 31st, 1882); Stephen Ryder, 
Southeast, 1828 (died April 30th, 1876j; John Hall, Southeast, 
1831; Piatt Baldwin, Southeast; Lewis Doane, Southeast; 
Thomas Gage, Southeast, about 1840; Jacob O. Howes, South 
east; Thatcher H. Theall, Southeast (died in 1886); and Leray 
Barnum, Southeast. 

There was, about the beginning of this century, a company of 
light infantry commanded by David Lambert De Forest.. A 
company of light horse cavalry was in existence for a long 
time. James Sherwood was its captain and flharles Brewster, 
lieutenant. 

The 61st Regiment, N. Y. S. M., was composed of the four 
western towns of the county. Its last colonel was Hitch- 
cock. It was in the 30th Brigade and 7th Division as was the 
35th. There was an artillery company in its bounds probably 
attached. to it, of which Capt. Edmund Pierce was commandant 
and Abel Gregory was lieutenant. 

The regimental parade was held at Boyd's tavern, near the 
present reservoir. It was a great day. Many an amusing anec- 
dote might be related of the actions of the "Mountaineers," a 
race now probably extinct; of their dances in the highways 
and throwing pumpkin pies at each other, besides other events 
not to be supi)osed to adoi'n liistory. Owing to tlie popularity 



222 HISTORY OF PUT:yAM COUNTY. 

of general trainiugs the regiment continued in good order 
till the change of law. In 1846 a law was passed exempting 
members of the nniformed militia from military service by a 
commutation of seventy-five cents. The law was amended in 
1847, and encouragement was given to the formation of uni- 
formed comi")anies. The State was divided into eight division 
districts and thirty-two brigade districts. The 7th Brigade 
District was composed of the counties of Putnam, West- 
chester and Rockland. 

The ISth Regimental District was composed of fourteen towns 
in Westchester and Putnam counties. Philipstown was the 6th 
Company district, Putnam Valley, Patterson and Kent com- 
posed the 7th Company district, and Southeast and Carmel the 
8th Company district of the regiment. A uniformed company 
was organized at Cold Spring in 6th Company district called th"e 
'''' Kemble Guards,^' an infantry company of which Levi L. Liv- 
ingston was captain, and Jackson O. Dykman was first lieu- 
tenant. The company was well uniformed and a creditable 
organization. 

Another company was organized in the 8th Company district, 
Southeast and Carmel, called the Putnam Guards, an infantry 
company of which James Ryder was captain, Jackson P. Bal- 
lard first lieutenant, and Edward Wright second lieutenant. 
The company was well organized and equipped and continued 
till the original members served out their time of enlistment. 
The organization was completed October 12th, 1848. In 1851 
the captain was promoted to be colonel of the 18th Regiment, 
Lieut. Ballard was elected captain and served till the company 
went out of service. An engineer corps was organized in Cold 
Spring in 1854 under the charge of Capt. George F. Sherman, 
Regimental Engineer, which was very complete in its organiza- 
tion and equipments. Capt. Sherman was promoted to the 
position of inspector general on the stafl" of Governor Morgan 
and Sylvester B. Truesdell was elected to succeed Mr. Sherman 
as captain of the corps. 

In 1865 a draft was ordered by Gov. Seymour to fill the 
militia regiments to the minimum number required by law and 
there were reorganizations and comjianies in 6th, 7th and 8th 
Districts, which continued till the regimental organization was 
disbanded in 1867, since which time there has been no militia 
organization in the count v. 



GENEKAL IIISTOIIY. 223 

April Sth, 1S64, James Ryder of the 18th Regiment was pro- 
moted by Gov. Horatio Seymour to be brigadier o-eneral of 
the 7th Brigade, and continued to hold the office till April Sth 
1875. 

The Kemble Guards were out in the United States service in 
1863 at the call of the ISth Regiment and were in service 45 
davs. 



CHAPTEB XYl. 

THE BENCH AND BAR OF PUTNAM COUNTY.' 

Hon. James Kent.— Henry B. Lee.— Ralsaman C. Austin.— George W. Niven. — 
Frederic Stone.— Walker Todd.— Jeremiah Hine. — Henry B. Cowles.— 
Elijah Yerks.— Howard H. \\niite.— Benjamin Bailey.— John G. Miller.- 
Charles Ga Nun.— Peter M. Jordan.— William A. Dean.— Levi H. McCoy.— 
James D. Little.— Charles H. Slosson.— Samuel J. Owen.— Owen T. CotRn.— 
William J. Blake.— Jackson O. Dykman.— George W. Horton.— Ambrose 
Ryder.— Edward Wright.— Charles H. Ferris.— Hon. William Wood.— 
Seymour B. Nelson. — James Gardiner. — Abram J. Miller.— William H. 
Haldane. — George E. Anderson. — Ward B. Yeomans. — Frederic S. Bar- 
num. — Clayton Ryder. — Hon. Hamilton Fish. — Hon. Robert Livingston. 

HON. JAMES KENT, the famous lawyer and Chancellor 
of the State of New York, was the sou of Moss Keut 
and grandson of Rev. Elisha Kent. He was born at Doansburg, 
town of Southeast, Putnam county, N. Y., July 31st, 17(53. 
When five years old he was placed in a school at Norwalk, 
Conn., and lived with his maternal grandfather. Rev. Joseph 
Moss, with whom he remained till 1772, when he went to reside 
with an uncle at Pawling, where he learned the rudiments of 
Latin. In May, 1773, he went to a Latin school in Danbury, 
and entered Yale College in Seprember, 1777. In after years 
he often mentioned the delight he experienced on his periodical 
returns from school, in rambling with his brother among the 
wild scenery of his native hills and valleys. 

In July. 1779, in consequence of the invasion of New Haven 
by the British troops, the college was broken up and the stu- 
dents dispersed. At this time he met with a copy of Black- 
stone's Commentaries, which so excited his admiration that he 
resolved to be a lawyer. In September, 1781, he graduated 
from college and going to Poughkeepsie commenced the study 

' The sketches of the deceased members of the Putnam County Bar in this 
chapter were prepared by Hon. Ambrose Ryder. 



GENKKAL HISTORY. 225 

of law under Egbert Benson, wlio was afterward one of the 
judges of the Supreme Court, and was admitted to the bar as 
an attorney, in January. 17SJ5. He then returned to his native 
place with the intention of commencing the practice of his pro- 
fession thei'e, but that secluded place furnished no proper field 
for his abilities and talents, and he shortly returned to Pongli- 
keepsie. 

In xlpril, 1787, he was admitted a counsellor of the Supreme 
Court. In politics he belonged to the Federal party, and was 
the intimate friend of Jay and Hamilton. In April, 1790, he 
was elected member of Assembly for Dutchess County, and 
again in 1792. At the urgent request of his friends he removed 
to New York in April, 1795, .finding there a greater scope for 
the exercise of his talents. In December, he was appointed 
professor of law in Columbia College, and delivered a course 
of lectures there. The trustees of the college conferred 
upon him the degree of Doctor of Laws, and he received 
similar honors from Harvard and Dartmouth. In February, 
1798, he was appointed a Master in Chancery, and in the same 
year was elected member of Legislature for New York. In 
March, 1797, he was appointed recorder of the city, and in 
1786 received the appointment of junior judge of the Supreme 
Court, and returned to Poughkeepsie, but in the following 
year removed to Albany, where he resided till 1823. 

In 1800, Judge Kent and Judge Radcliffe were appointed to 
revise the statutes of the State, and in 1802 they were published 
in two volumes. In July, 1804, he was appointed chief justice 
of the Supreme Court and presided till 1814. In 1814, he was 
appointed Chancellor, and the various and learned decisions by 
him have given a lasting honor to his name. July 31st, 1823, 
having attained the age of sixty, which was the constitutional 
limit for the tenure of the office, he retired from court after 
hearing and deciding every case brought before him. It was at 
this time that he revisited his native place, and was a boy again 
■when he entered the house where he was born. 

In November, 1826, appeared the first volume of his "Com- 
mentaries on ATuericau Law."" Tlie second volume appeared in 
November, 1827, the third in 182S, and the fourth in 1830. If 
is enough t(j say of this great work, that until the present sys- 
tem of things shall be succeeded either by a higher law or utter 
lawlessne'ss, " Kent's Commentaries" must be the source from 



226 HISTORY OF putnam col-:ntt. 

which the student will derive his first knowledge of the princi- 
ples of law, and what Blackstone was to England, Chancellor 
Kent has been to America. 

During the remainder of his life Chancellor Kent resided in 
New York and died there at his residence, No. 20 Union Square, 
on the evening of December 12th, 1847, having reached his 85th 
year. His mortal remains were laid to rest in the cemetery at 
Fishkill, Dutchess county, by the grave of his only son. 

A full account of his family will be found in the sketch of 
the descendants of Rev. Elisha Kent, in anotlier portion of this 
work. It is no injustice to the dead, nor disparagement to 
the living, to say that James Kent was the most prominent 
man born within the limits of Putnam county, and of his great- 
ness and fame the county and his native town may well be 
proud. 

Henry Bird Lee was born in Greene county, about the 
year 1781. He practiced law in Patterson, but for how many 
years, we have been unable to • learn. He was elected to the 
Assembly in 181 5, and at the general election held in April, 
1816, he was elected to Congress. 'He died September 16th, 1816. 
He was ixnmarried. 

Ralsaman C. Austin' practiced law at Carmel from about 
the time of the organization of the county in 1812 until about 
1817 when he removed to Peekskill, where he continued in 
practice for some years, and afterward became a clerk in one of 
the departments of the government at Washington, where he 
remained until his death, in 1843. He married a Miss Margaret 
Diven, of Peekskill, by whom he had three daughters. He 
was surrogate of Putnam county from April 2d, 1813, to Feb- 
Tuary 28th. 1815. 

George ^V. Niven practiced law at Carmel from 1812 to 
1815, a part of the time in ixartnership with Walker Todd. He 
removed to Poaghkeepsie and from there to New York. The 
date of hi.s death has not been ascertained. He married a 
daughter of Robert Johnston of Carmel. 

FitEDERic Stoxe, son of Darius and Anna (Hill) Stone, was 
born in Guilford, Conn., March 2lst, 1785. He received his 
education at the old academy in Patterson, N. Y., under the 
Hev. Mr. MacNeece, a distinguished classical .scholar and a 
;a;raduate of Trinity College, Dublin. After he had been fitted 
til enter tlie soplioinore class in Yale College his health became 




^ /Sz^ 



GENERAL irrSTORT. 227 

impaired and the idea of a college education was reluctantly 
abandoned. 

He began the study of the law with Harvy Swift of Beekman, 
completed his legal studies in the office of General Brush of 
Poughkeepsie, and was admitted to the Bar in 1S13. x\pril 
16th, 1816, lie was appointed Master in Chancery by Gov. 
Daniel D. Tompkins. In October, 1820, he married Margaret 
E. Howland, daughter of William Rowland and niece of Dr. 
Rowland of Patterson. February 27th, 1821, he was appointed 
by DeWitt Clinton, district attorney of Putnam county, and 
continued in that office until February 25th, 1829, when he 
was appointed by Martin Van Buren, then governor of New 
York, by whom he was examined when admitted to the Bar, 
first judge of the Court of Common Pleas of Putnam county. 
His connection with the bench was terminated voluntarily 
April 27th, 1833, in order to return to the practice of his pro- 
fession. He was again appointed district attorney in 1837, this 
time by Governor William L. Marcy, and held the office for the 
ensuing ten years. It was during this time that Denny was 
convicted of murder and hanged in the Court House yard at 
Carmel, being the only criminal ever executed in Putnam 
county. 

In 1842 Judge Stone was a candidate for State Senator, but 
was defeated in the convention by one vote, Abraham Bockee 
of Dutchess county, receiving the nomination. In 1813 he re- 
ceived the regular democratic nomination for the Assembly but 
was defeated by an indejiendent candidate from the western 
part of the county. 

In November, 1850, he was elected district attorney and held 
the office for the next three years, being succeeded by Charles 
Ga Nun. Judge Stone continued in the active practice of his 
profession up to the time of his death, which occurred in Pat- 
terson, December 2d, 1857. His widow survived him nearly a 
quarter of a century, and his three daughters, Mary A. Stone, 
Jane C. Stone and Frances E. Barnum, widow of the late Le 
Ray Barnum, are still living on the old homestead in Patterson. 

Perhaps at the time of his death no man iii the county was 
more generally known to the people than he. He had been a 
member of the Bar since the formation of the county and from 
that time to the time of his death had been in active legal prai^- 
tice. The difficult and responsible duties appertaining to the 



228 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

offices of county judge and district attorney were satisfactorily' 
discharged. Many important criminal trials were successfully 
conducted by him. 

As a lawyer Judge Stone was sound, faithful and honest. No 
client, w^e think, ever had occasion to complain of his want of 
vigilance or perseverance. He was the contemporary of Todd, 
Hine, Cowles, Swift, Cleveland and Nelson, and always believed 
that these distinguished men were- superior to the generation 
that succeeded them. 

In politics Judge Stone was a democrat. His political course 
was always regular and straightforward. He died a member of 
the Protestant Episcopal Church. It was his fortune to move 
calmly and quietly through life and his record is clean and 
pure. 

Walker Todd was born in New Milford, Conn., about the 
year 1790. He graduated at Yale College in 1810 and com- 
menced the practice of the law at Cafmel in 1813, in yjartner- 
ship with George W. Niven until Mr. Niven removed from the 
county in 1815. Mr. Todd held the office of district attorney 
from June, 1818, to February, 1821. He held the office of sur- 
rogate from March, 1819, to February, 1821, and from January, 
1833, to September 30th, 1839. He was appointed an inspector 
of the State prison at Sing Sing in 1832 and held the office until 
1840. In November, 1827, he was elected to the Senate of this 
State for the term of four years, and served for the full term. 
In November, 1836, he was the regular democratic candidate for 
Congress in tlie district comprised of Westchester and Putnam 
counties, but was defeated by Gouverneur Kemble who ran as 
a stump candidate. Mr. Todd continued the practice of the law 
at Carmel until near the time of his death, when he received a 
stroke of paralysis which terminated his active career. He died 
in August, 1840. He married Sarah Ann Smith, by whom he 
had a large family of children. 

Jeremiah Hine, son of Charles Hine, was born in the town 
of Southeast, January 26th, 179o. He graduated at Yale College 
in the class of 1815, and at once commenced the study of the 
law. In 1820 he commenced practice at Carmel and in the latter 
part of that year formed a partnership with Henry B. Cowles, 
wliicli continued until Mr. Cowles removed to the city of New 
Y'ork in 1834. ^Ir. Hine continued in practice at Carmel until 
his death, which occurred August 24th, 1838. He held the office 



GENERAL HISTORY. 229 

of .snrro,!j,-ate of Putnam county from March 2Sth, 1822, to Jan- 
nary 31st, 1S33. He was district attorney from September 8th, 
1829, to the time of his death. He married Miss Zillah Cole, by 
whom he had one son, who died in infancy. 
• Henry B. Cowles, son of Elias and Lydia (Adams) Cowles, 
was born in Litchfield, Conn., March 18th, 179S. His maternal 
grandfathei-, Andrew Adams, was a member of the Continental 
Congress in 1778, and was chief justice of the Superior Court 
of Connecticut from 1793 to the time of his death. 

The parents of Mr. Cowles removed to Rhinebeck, Dutchess 
county, N. Y., about the year 1804. Mr. Cowles graduated at 
Union College in 1816, and while in college was elected a mem- 
ber of the Phi Beta Kappa Society. He studied law under 
Judge Reeves of Litchfield, and after practicing for a few 
months at Beekman, in Dutchess county, removed to Carmel in 
1820, where he formed a partnership with Jeremiah Hine under 
the firm name of Cowles & Hine, and continued in practice 
there until the year 1834, when he opened an office in New York 
city where he continued in the active practice of his profession 
until 1860. From that time he undertook no new cases and 
about the year 1865 retired from law practice entirely. In 1870 
he removed to Farmington, Conn., where he continued to reside 
until his death which occurred in New York while on a tempo- 
rary visit. May 17th, 1873. 

While residing in Putnam county Mr. Cowles was for three 
consecutive years elected to the Assembly, serving in the ses- 
sions of 1826. 1827 and 1828. While in the Legislature he took 
an active and efficient part in the settlement of the Astor claim, 
securing the passage of the several acts under which the State 
of New York assumed the payment to John Jacob Astor of 
$450,000 in satisfaction of his claim as purchaser, to the lands 
in Putnam county belonging to the heirs of Roger Morris, which 
were confiscated by the State, and to which titles had been given 
by the State through deeds executed by commissioners of for- 
feiture. In the celebrated suits brought to estabiisli Mr. Astor's 
claim, Mr. Cowles was one of the counsel on the part of the 
State. In 1828 Mr. Cowles Avas elected to Congress from the 
District composed of AVestchester and Putnam counties. He 
was never married. 

Elijah Yerks, son of William Yerks, was born in Mount 
Pleasant, Westchester countv, about the vear 1806. After beins 



230 HISTOKT OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

admitted to the Bar, he commenced practice in Carmel in 1839, 
and remained in practice there until 1851, when he removed to 
Tarrytown, where he continued in practice until his death 
which occurred in 1864. In 1847 he was the regular democratic 
candidate for county judge of Putnam county. He was never 
married. 

Howard Hart White, son of Ebenezer B. White, was born 
in Danbury, Connecticut, in 1810. _ He entered Yale College 
but did not graduate. He attended the Yale Law School dur- 
ing the years 1829 and 1830, and studied law in New York city 
in the office of Charles O'Connor. After his admission to the 
Bar he practiced law for several years, occupying the same 
office with Henry B. Cowles, through whose advice he came to 
Carmel, where he opened a law ofiice in September, 1839. He 
was appointed surrogate of Putnam county September 30th, 
1839, and held the office until April 2d, 1840, when failing 
health compelled him to resign. He died in Danbury, April 
4th, 1840, of consumption. He married Emma Hart, of Troy, 
N. Y., by whom he had two children, both of whom died before 
arriving at maturity. 

Ben.iamin Bailey, son of Benjamin Bailey, was born in 
Carmel in 1813. He was admitted to the Bar in 1842 and im- 
mediately thereafter commenced the practice of the law in 
Carmel, where he remained until the year 1853, when he opened 
an office in New York city. He continued in practice in New 
York until 1855, when he resumed his practice in Carmel and 
remained in practice there until within a few years of his death, 
which occurred July 13th, 1872. 

Mr. Bailey represented Putnam county in the Assembly in 
the years 1845, 1846 and 1856. In 1848 he was the candidate 
of the Barnburner wing of the democratic party for representa- 
tive in Congress in the district composed of Dutchess and 
Putnam counties. 

As a lawyer he was often called to the defense in criminal 
cases. The most noted case in which he was engaged was that 
of George Denny, who was tried for the murder of Abraham 
Wanzer, in 1843. Denny was tried twice, the jury failing to 
agree upon the first trial, but upon the second he was found 
guilty and afterward executed. Mr. Bailey tried the case for 
the defendant upon both occasions and was indefatigable in his 
efforts to save him. 



CtE>'^ekal history. 



231 



Mr. Bailey mamed Calista Wilson and left two sons surviv- 
ing him. The eldest, Elbert T., resides at Mount Kisco, and 
ha°s been president of tlie village. The youngest, William F.^ 
is a lawyer residing at Eau Claire, W^isconsin. 

John' Griffen Miller, son of Abraham and Elizabeth 
(Griffen) Miller, was born at Yorktown, Westchester county. 
New York, December 23d, 1S14. While engaged in school 
teaching he commenced the study of -the law.^at first with Ben- 
jamin Bailey and afterward at Somers with Lee & Briggs. and 
was admitted to practice in 1846. In the spring of 1847 he- 
moved with his family to Carmel where he opened a law office and 
continued in the active practice of his profession until near the- 
time of his death which occurred March 31st, 1885. 

He twice held the office of district attorney, the first time 
by appointment of the governor to fill the vacancy caused by 
the resignation of Charles Ga Nun, being appointed April 
10th, 1850. and holding the office until January 1st, 1851; and 
the second time by election in November, 1853, for the term of 
three years. He was appointed assessor of internal revenue for 
the 10th District of New York, comprising the counties of 
Westchester, Putnam and Kockland, by President Grant, oa 
:the 15th of April, 1869, and held the office for several years. 

Mr. Miller was twice married. His first wife, Phebe P., 
daughter of Isaac and Patience Carpenter, to whom he was 
.married September 20^.h, 1837, died May 8th, 1856. By her he 
had seven children, of whom three sons and a daughter survive- 
him. His eldest son, William I., formerly deputy county clerk 
of Putnam county, died at the age of thirty-three. His second 
son, Henry F., is a dental surgeon residing in Carmel. His third 
son, Abram J., is a lawyer and present district attorney of Put- 
nam county, residing in Brewster. His fourth son. Alonzo B.,. 
is a dental surgeon residing in New York city. His daughter^ 
Phebe P., is the wife of James A. Foshay, the present school 
commissioner of Putnam county. 

Mr. Miller's second wife, Emily A. Cutts, of Kittery, Maine,. 
to whom he was married September 25th, 1800, and l\v whom 
he has one daughter, Anna C, survives him. 

Cii.VRLKS Ga Nun, son of Edward Ga Nun, was born in 
North Salem in 1817. He prepared for college at the North 
Salem and Peekskill Academies, and graduated at Williams-. 
CoUefi-e in 1830. He studied law in the office of Ambrose L. 



232 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

Jordan and was admitted to practice in 1842. In the fall of 
that year he opened a law office at Carmel and remained in 
practice there until 1858, when he removed to New York city, 
where he continued in law practice until his death which oc- 
curred in November, 1862. From the year 1848 Peter M. Jordan, 
late of Hudson, was associated with him. Mr. Ga Nun's attain- 
ments as a lawyer were so well recognized that his office was a 
favorite school for law students, and many young men received 
their legal education under his guidance. 

Mr. Ga Nun was elected district attorney in 1847, but resigned 
the office in 1850. He was the candidate of the Hunker wing 
of the democratic party for representative in Congress in 1848, 
and in 1855, was a candidate for justice of the Supreme Court 
for the Second Judicial District. Mr. Ga Nun was never 
married. 

Peter M. Jordan was born at Claverack, Columbia county. 
New York, October 21st, 1818. He was the eldest son of Dr. 
Abram Jordan, an eminent physician of that place. He was a 
member of the class of 1838 of Union College, but did not gradu- 
ate. He studied law in the office of his uncle, Ambrose L. 
Jordan, a man of great ability, and afterward attorney general 
of the State, and was admitted to practice about the year 1842* 
After jDracticing his profession for a few years in Hudson he re- 
moved to Carmel in 1848, where he became associated with 
Charles Ga Nun, remaining with him at Carmel until 1858, when 
they established an office in New York city and continued in 
practice there until the death of Mr. Ga Nun in 1862. After 
that time Mr. Jordan continued at Hudson until his death 
which occurred February 1st, 1886. Mr. Jordan was elected 
district attorney of Putnam county in November, 1856, and held 
the office until he removed to New York. He married Miss Jane 
Flaherty who survives him. 

William A. Dean, son of Richard Dean, was born in Carmel, 
January 4th, 1819. He was educated at private schools and at 
the Peekskill Academy. He studied law with Ward & Lock- 
wood at Sing Sing, and was admitted to practice in 1845. He 
commenced practice at Carmel immediately after his admission 
and remained in practice at that place until the year 1853, when 
he removed to the city of New York, where he continued to 
practice until liis death wliich occurred July IStli, 1S54. While 
at Carmel he was twice elected justice of the peace, holding the 



GKXEIiAL HISTORY. 233 

office from April, 1847, niUil he removed from the county. He 
was never married. 

Levi H. McCoy was born Jannarj^ Sth, 1852, at Wanta.se, 
Sussex county, New Jersey. He studied law at Goshen and at 
Newburgh with Judge Monell and was admitted to the bar in 

1848. He commenced the practice of tlie law at Cold Spring in 

1849, and continued in active practice until his death which 
occurred suddenly January 29th, 1868. In 1860, he opened an 
office in New York city, practicing in both places at that time. 
In 18.58, he was elected district attorney of Putnam county, hold- 
ing the office for the term of three years. December 5th, 1852, 
he married Angeline Phillips of Cold Spring, by whom he had 
four. sons. 

James Dynes Little was born in New York city. May 
15th, 1832. In his young days he learned the printers trade, 
and in 1849, at the early age of seventeen, he came to Carmel 
and assumed the editorial and general management of the 
" Putnam Democrat." In 1852 he was elected a justice of the 
peace and hekl the office until January, 1857, when he was 
appointed an inspector in the New York Custom House. This 
position he resigned for that of private secretary to Collector 
Schell. In July, 1861, having resigned his position in New 
York, he went to the West, and having previously devoted his 
spare time to the sturdy of the law he was admitted to practice 
in Missouri, and in partnership with his brotlier-in-law, Ex- 
Governor Beebe, opened a law office in Kansas City. But the 
Civil War destroyed business and the office was soon closed. 
Mr. Little returned East and in December, 1861, was admitted 
to the Bar of tliis State. In April, 1862, he opened a law office 
in Carmel and continued in active practice to the time of his 
death. Mr. Little established the "Putnam County Courier '' 
and was its editor during all his residence in the county, rais- 
ing it to a high state of prosperity. 

In 1864 and again in 1867 he was elected district attorney of 
the county, holding the office for six years. 

Mr. Little married. August 28th, 1854, Mary Virginia, 
daughter of Elder Gilbert Beebe of Middletown, N. Y. Five 
daughters and three sons were born to them, of whom all ex- 
cept the eldest son and youngest daughter, survive. 

In the fall of 1877 Mr. Little was prostrated by a severe at- 



234 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

tack of pneumonia from which he never fully recovered. He 
died August 24th, 1S83. 

Charles Henry Slosson, son of Augustus D. Slosson, was 
born in North Salem, Westchester county, New York, Feb- 
ruary 2Sth, 1S42. He entered Yale College in the class which 
graduated in 1863, but after remaining in college two years was 
obliged to leave on account of ill health. He studied law at 
"White Plains, with Close & Robertson, and was admitted to 
practice in June, 1865. He immediately commenced practice at 
Brewster, and remained in practice at that place until August, 
1867, when he was prostrated witli i^neumonia, leaving him 
very weak and ending in quick cousumption, of which he died 
June 22d, 1868. September 6th, 1866, he married Miss Emily 
Teller, daughter of Dr. Harrison Teller of Brooklyn, by whom 
he had one son, Harrison Teller Slosson, born in September, 
1867, now a student in Columbia College. 

Samul J. Owen was born in Putnam Valley in 1843. After 
being admitted to the Bar, he practiced law at Cold Spring un- 
til his death, which occurred October 21st, 1877. He was dis- 
trict attorney for two terms, holding the office for six years, 
commencing January 1st, 1871. He married Isabella E., daugh- 
ter of John Rusk, by whom he had several children. He was 
a member of the ISth Regiment of New York Volunteers, in 
the suppression of the rebellion. 

The following have retired from practice or removed from 
the county: 

Owen Tristraji Coffin, son of Robert Coffin, was born in 
Washington, Dutchess county, July 17th, 1815. He graduated 
at Union College in 1837; studied law with Judge Rufus W. 
Peckham at Albany; was admitted to the Bar in 1840; and com- 
menced practice at Carmel, remaining there about two years, 
when he removed to Poughkeepsie. He remained in practice 
at Poughkeepsie until 1851, when he removed to Peekskill, 
Westchester county, where he has resided to the present time. 
In November, 1870, he was elected surrogate of Westchester 
county and still holds the office. He has been twice married. 
His first wife was Belinda E. Maison, and his second, Harriette 
Barlow. 

William J. Blake was born July 22d, 1817, at the Blake 
homestead, in the eastern part of the town of Montgomery, 



GENERAL HISTORY. 235 

Orange county, New York. He is a son of Hon. Edward and 
Chloe Belknap Blake, and with his twin brother, David A., is 
the youngest of a family of eight children. His ancestors 
were English on his paternal and maternal side. The ancestral 
line is traceable back to Robert Blake, a member of the Long 
Parliament, which resisted the nsurpafionand tyranny of King 
Charles I. until civil war was the result. He was appointed a 
general in the Parliamentary army and resigned his seat at the 
beginning of the struggle with the King in 1642. In 1649, he 
was transferred from the land to the naval forces, with the 
title of " General of the Sea." In 1652, he became chief ad- 
miral. He is regarded by all Englishmen as the '"Father of 
the British Navy." He was born at Bridgewater, Somerset- 
shire, England: and from that family nest his descendants have 
winged their way to Scotland, the north of Ireland, Canada 
and the United States. 

In the early part of the eighteenth century, three brothers of 
the name of Blake, emigrated from England to this country. 
One settled in Mas.sachnsetts, one in Pennsylvania, and one on 
Long Island, who subsequently removed to Orange county, 
New York. The latter was the great-grandfather of the sub- 
ject of this sketch. The descendants of these three emigrant 
brothers are numerous, and may be found in half of the States 
of the Union. 

Mr. Blake's mother was a descendant of the Belknap family, 
English Puritans who emigated to Massachusetts, a member of 
which (who was her father) subsequently removed and settled a 
short distance north of Providence, in Rhode Island. 

After attending a common school until he was nearly fifteen 
years of age, Mr. Blake commenced his academic course at the 
Montgomery Academy, Orange county, where he remained 
until April, 1837, when he entered the Sophomore class of 
Union College at Schenectady, from which he graduated in 
June, 1S39, and in the following September went South, and for 
one year was a tutor in the family of a naval commander. In 
September, 1S40, he returned home and commenced the study 
of law in the office of Hon. Charles Borland, of Montgomery. 
In December, 1S43, he was licensed as an attorney of the Su- 
preme Court at Rochester. His father told him that if he was 
licensed to "return home, stay till spring, and look around for 
a iDlace to settle." From Rochester he went to New York to 



236 iriSTOPvY OF PUTNAM COUNTr. 

visit relatives, and on his return stopped at Cold Spring (but 
without a thought of settling there) to visit a lady whom his 
.father and mother had brought up from girlhood. Visiting a 
Justice's Court the next day, in company with a former resi- 
dent of Newburgh, he was retained to try two causes in succes- 
sion, won both, and was retained to try five others during the 
remainder of the week. He concluded that, since rhere was 
apparently "a sight of petty litigation" there, he might as 
well remain there the remainder of the winter and begin the 
practice of law, instead of going home and doing nothing until 
spring. He had no ofiice, nor a law book with him, was simply 
a visitor, and, with the exception of those he called on, a 
stranger in the place. Even then he had no intention of set- 
tling there. 

He went to New York, bought a few necessary books, returned 
to Cold Spring, rented an office, and hung out his sign. Before 
spring came he concluded that he might as well remain there as 
to seek a location elsewhere. In 1846, Governor Silas Wright 
appointed him a master and examiner in the Court of Chancery. 
In 1848, when not engaged in office business or attending courts, 
he hastily gathered up materials for a "History of Putnam 
County," which he wrote during leisure hours, and published 
it in the winter of 1849. 

Conscious that his hearing was becoming too much impaired 
to further j)rosecute his profession with any hope of profit and 
success, he closed his office in April, 1850, and made a tour 
through Minnesota, visiting Stillwater, St. Paul and the Crow 
Wing Indian Agency, about one hundred miles northwest of 
St. Paul, where he spent the summer, and returned late in the 
fall to St. Paul, where he passed the winter. In the spring of 
1851, he returned to Orange county. In September, 1852, the 
late proprietor of the "Putnam County Courier" sent him an 
invitation to become associate editor of the "Courier." He 
accepted and came to Carmel in the above named month and 
year. 

In 1854, he was appointed postmaster at Carmel. under Presi- 
dent Pierce's administration. June 12th, 1858, he founded the 
" Putnam Free Press," the first republican newspaper estab- 
lished in Putnam county, edited and published it until October 
17th, 1868, when he sold it to A. J. Hicks. February 14th, 
1880, a member of his family purchased the office and paper 



GENEliAL HISTORY. 237 

from Mr. Hicks, and changed the name of the paper from 
"Gleneida Monitor," to "Putnam County Republican." He 
again became its political and literary editor, and Ida M., his 
daughter, its publisher and proprietor, and junior editor. 

He married Miss Emelinda Minor, daughter of tlie late Charles 
Minor, of Carmel, and has three daughters. 

On an adjoining page will be found Mr. Blake's portrait, 
taken at the age of thirtj^- two years. 

Hon. JacksojST O. Dykmain- was born in the town of Patter- 
son in Putnam county. His great-grandfather, Joseph Dykman, 
settled in what is now the town of Southeast, in Putnam county, 
and beeanie a captain in the Continental Army of the Revo- 
lutionary War. 

His early life was the uneventful career of a boy in the county 
attending the common school of the neighborhood and working 
on a farm. In this manner he obtained sufficient education to 
enable him to teach a common school at a very early age. He 
pursued this occupation until he commenced the study of the 
law in the office of the Hon. William Nelson then a prominent 
lawyer at Peekskill, Westchester county, who manifested a 
lively interest in his advancement and gave him generous aid 
and assistance. •, 

After his admission to the Bar he settled in Cold Spring, Put- 
nam county, where he was shortly after elected to the office of 
school commissioner, and afterward to the office of district at- 
torney of the county. 

In the spring of 1S6G Ih: Dykman removed to White Plains, 
in Westchester county, where he has since resided. 

In the fall of 1S68 he was elected by a very handsome ma- 
jority to the office of district attorney of Westchester county, 
then a very responsible position, which he filled to the entire 
satisfaction of the jjeople. He particularly distinguished him- 
self by the energy, skill and success with which he prosecuted 
the famous Buckhout murder case, one of the celebrated cases 
in the history of the county. 

In the fall of 1S75 Mr. Dykman was elected to the high office 
of justice of the Supreme Court of the State of New York for 
the Second Judicial District by a union of both political par- 
ties. He was nominated and supported as the regular candidate 
of the republican party and elected by the people by a majority 
exceedin.<4' ten thousand. 



238 HISTORY OF PriT^^AM COUjS'TV. 

That nomination made by a party with which he had never 
acted was a splendid tribute to his ability, and the result has 
shown that the confidence of the people was not misplaced. 
In the performance of his judicial duties Judge Dykman is 
ever patient, affable and courteous. He is kind and obliging to 
the members of the bar, especially to the younger lawyers. 

Judge Dykman has been a member of the general term of the 
Supreme Court from the time he took his seat on the bench, 
and his opinions in that court in the numerous cases on appeal 
evince laborious research, sound judgment and discretion, and 
absolute fairness and impartiality, and demonstrate the pro- 
priety of his elevation to the high judicial position he occupies. 
At the circuit for the trial of cases he is a favorite with both 
lawyers and suitors for his patience and impartiality. He 
manifests great love for justice and right and deep abhorrence 
for wrong and oppression. 

Judge Dykman is emphatically a man of the people, with 
whom he has always mingled freely and sympathized fully, and 
■vvhose interests he has ever been ready to maintain and defend; 
and he listens with willingness to the petitions and complaints 
of all, and the people love him and place reliance upon him. 
He is a man of simple habits and modest deportment, but studi- 
ously observes the quality of amenity and propriety, and treats 
all with whom he comes in contact with great consideration and 
politeness. In many ways he is an illustration of what may be 
accomplished under our Republican institutions where the 
highest positions are within the grasp of all. By energy and 
perseverance he has risen to a high position without the aid of 
wealth or influence. The people have found him a man on whom 
they could rely and have accordingly bestowed on him their 
confidence and raised him to eminence, and it is not too much 
to say that he has fulfilled all their expectations. There never 
was a stain on his private character nor on his public record, 
and the breath of suspicion has never reached him. 

In his domestic and private life he has been exemplary and 
fortunate. He was earlj* married to Miss Emily L. Trowbridge, of 
Peekskill, a descendant of the New Haven famil\- of that name, 
a most excellent and domestic lady who aided and encouraged 
him in all his struggles, and he never hesitated to declare that 
he owed his success and advancement to her untiring energy 
and zeal, her wise counsel and advice, and her laudable ambi- 





|''fx/wi^u' 



GENERAL HISTORY. 239 

tion. In many dark days she showed him thp silver lining of 
the dark cloud and gave him new hope and energy. She still 
lives to share his honors and his prosperity as she would his 
adversity, a noble example of a faithful wife, a devoted 
mother and a benevolent Christian woman. 

They have two sons, both of whom are lawyers. The elder, 
William N. Dykman, married Miss Bell Annan, and is prac- 
ticing his profession very successfully in Brooklyn. The 
younger, Henry T. Dykman, married Mis.s- Ella B. Clyne, of 
Dutchess county, and is practicing law in White Plains, where 
he has accumulated a very good practice. 

Such is the Honorable Jackson O. Dykman, the subject of 
this sketch, and his example may well be imitated by the young 
men of the county. 

He is a democrat in the broadest sense of the term, but not 
a partisan, and a consistent member of the Episcopal Church. 

G-EORGE WrLLiA:\[ HoRTOX, son of Morgan Horton, was born 
in Southeast, January 21st, 1857. He graduated at the State 
Normal School, Albany, in 1875. He studied law with Close & 
Robertson at White Plains, and graduated at the New York 
Pniversity Law School in 1S7S, with the degree of LL. B. He 
practiced law in New York city and at Brewster, in Putnam 
county. He is not at present in active practice. 

The following are at the present time in practice in Putnam 
county: 

Ambrose Ryder. Among the members of the legal profes- 
sion, a prominent place must be given to Hon. Ambrose Ryder, 
who has been for many years closely identified with its in- 
terests and is at the present time the oldest ijracticing lawyer 
in the county. 

Judge Ryder was born in Southeast, on the old family home- 
stead near Peach Pond, March 5th, 1826; being the eldest 
child of Stephen and Betsy (Nichols) Ryder; a more extended 
account of wliom will be found in the article on the ''Ryder 
family," in another portion of this work. He was prepared 
for college at the North Salem Academy, then under the care 
of Prof. John F. Jenkins. At this institution he was a fellow 
pupil of Gen. Darius N. Couch, and D. O. Mills, the noted 
millionaire. He entered Williams College and graduated from 
that institution in 1S4G. After leaving collea-e Judee Rvder 



240 HISTORY OF PUTXAM COUNTY. 

Studied law in the office of Charles Ga Nun, Esq., of Carmel, 
and continued it with Henry B. Cowles. Having been admitted 
to the bar in 1849, he began the practice of his profession in 
the village of Carmel, where he has continued it till the present 
time. In the full of 1851 he was elected to the office of county 
jiidgeand was twice re-elected, holding the position for a period 
of twelve years. In February, 1873, Judge Ryder was ap- 
pointed county treasurer, to fill a vacancy occasioned by the 
death of Mr. John Cornish. In 1SS2, he was elected supervisor 
of Carmel and in the campaign of 1868, he was the republican 
candidate for the position of -presidential elector. From the 
founding of the Putnam County Bank, he has been closely 
connected with its interests, and has held the offices of director, 
cashier, vice-president, and president, in which last position he 
still remains. 

Judge Ryder was married, October 22d, 1849, to Miss Mary 
Miranda, daughter of Rev. Shaler J. and Catharine Hillyer. 
The children of this marriage are Hillyer, the present treasurer 
of Futnam county; Clayton, a practicing lawyer in Carmel; 
Mary Grace, and Stephen. All the sons are graduates of 
Cornell University. Mrs. Ryder died April 23d, 1870. 

Hon. Edward Wright. Among the men of Putnam county 
who have risen by their own unaided efforts to positions of 
trust and honor, a prominent place should be given to Edward 
Wright, who was for twenty years judge of Putnam county. 
Robert Wright, the ancestor of this family, was a resident of 
that portion of Fredericksburg Precinct which afterward be- 
came the town of Carmel, before the Revolution, and his son, 
Robert, was a citizen of the same place till the time of his 
death, which occurred April 19th, 18.52, at the age of 78. Robert 
Wright, jr., married Marian Cunningham, and they were the pa- 
rents of eight children: John, Robert, Edward, Ebenezer, Mary 
A., v.'ife of Abel Ganong, Elizabeth, wife of Eleazar Ferguson, 
Phebe, and Delilah, wife of Smith Dean. 

John Wright is now^ living at Lake Mahopac, at the advanced 
age of 84. He married Sarah A., daughter of Ezra Frost, who 
was the brother of Joel Frost, the first surrogate of the county. 
The children of this marriage were Ebenezer, who died in 1848, 
unmarried, and Edward, the subject of this sketch. 

.ludge^ Wright was born May 15th, 1820, on tlie old hume- 
stoad in Union Valley now owned by the heirs of Bailwy Ga- 




^n.^^ 



.^siO-tL^V'^ 



G-EJ^EUAL HISTORY. 241 

nong. During his boyhood he attended the vilhige school, and 
after some experience as a teacher entered the Normal School 
at Albany, from which he graduated in 1848. After graduating 
he followed the business of teaching for several years, but his 
tastes and inclinations being for political affairs he soon became 
a candidate for local ofBce. April 2d, 1850, he was elected town 
superintendent of schools, which office he held by successive 
re elections until the system was abolished by the Legislature 
in 1856. In 1851 he was elected justice of the peace, holding 
that position until March, 1861, when he resigned, having been 
elected county clerk in November, 1860. The latter office he 
held for the term of three years. He was elected inspector of 
election April 3d, 1855, and town clerk April 7th, 1857. He was 
appointed census marshall and took the United States census 
of Putnam county in 1860. He was clerk of the Board of 
Supervisors from 1853 to 1856, and from 1858 to 1861. Durin<r 
his term as county clerk he engaged in the study of the lawj 
and previous to his admission to the bar he was elected county 
judge, taking his seat in January, 1864. This responsible 
position Judge Wright continued to fill with ability and integ- 
rity till January, 1884. 

Having completed his law studies he was admitted to the 
Bar, May 16th, 1866, and his time not employed in the perform- 
ance of judicial duties has been devoted to the practice of his 
profession, in which he holds an honorable rank among the 
members of the Putnam County Bar. 

January 1st, 1850, he was married to Phebe E., daughter of 
Job C. Austin, a prominent citizen of the county. Their chil- 
dren are Lillie A., wife of Henry A. Gahn, and Mattie, wife of 
Willis A. Ganong. 

The home of Judge Wright is situated on the road to Crotou 
Falls, a short distance from Lake Mahopac, being a portion of 
the farm of Benjamin Townsend, at whose house the first 
Methodist meetings in that section were held. This place he 
bought of John Beyea in 1850 and it has since been his home. 

A prominent member of the democratic party. Judge Wright 
lias been a frequent delegate to State and judicial conventions, 
:i.nd his well merited success in official as v/ell as financial 
matters is the natural result of steady pei'severance and unceas- 
iu2,- labor. 



242 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

Charles H. Ferris was born in Matteawan, Dutchess county, 
New Tork, in December, 1S34. About two years after, he re- 
moved with his parents to Cold Spring, where he still resides. 
His parents, Philander and Mary A. (Lockwood) Ferris, were 
born in Connecticut. Soon after their marriage they located at 
Matteawan, N. Y., where two children, Elethea and Charles 
H., were born. His father was a mason and builder, and built 
many of the early buildings erected in Cold Spring, ISelson- 
ville and vicinity. His mother died in October, 1877. His 
father is still living, at Cold Sirring, at the age of eighty. He 
has one brother and two sisters uow living, viz., Elethea, wife 
of Smith Forman, Josiah and Amy J. 

Charles H. first attended school in the brick school house in 
Nelsonville, and afterward in some of the adjoining districts. 
About the year 1S4S he was placed in a private school in Cold 
Spring, of which Professor Daniels was principal, and in which 
he remained three years. After leaving this school he com- 
menced the study of law in the office of Hon. J. O. Dykman in 
Cold Spring, where he remained for one year. In 1852, he en- 
tered the office of Close & Robertson, at Mott Haven, West- 
chester county, N. Y.. and remained with them until 1855. In 
that year he was admitted to practice as an attorney at law by 
the General Term of the Supreme Court, held at Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

After being admitted to the Bar he continued in the office 
of Close & Robertson about one year, then returned to Cold 
Spring, and commenced the practice of the law, and has been 
very successful in his profession. 

In 1862, he was elected a justice of the peace of his town, and 
has continuously held this office down to this time (except for 
about three months), a period of nearly twenty-four years, and 
for a large part of the time that he was justice of the peace, he 
also held the office of police justice of the town of Philipstown, 
under annual appointments by the police commissioners of that 
town. 

In 1865, lie was appointed assistant assessor of Internal 
Revenue for tlie town of Philipstown by Andrew Johnson, 
president of the United States, and held this office until 1868. 

In 1S66, he married Miss Mary A. Carey, daughter of William 
and Catharine Carey of New York city. She was a graduate 
of tlie Normal School. New York, and at the time of her mar- 



X 





GENERAL HISTORY. 243 

riage was, and for some years previous had been a teacher in 
the public schools in that city. They have two children, Katie 
L. and May A. Ferns, who, with an adopted son, Willie C. 
Ferris, are now attending the same district school that their 
father attended, and in which district he has resided since he 
came to Cold Spring in 1836. 

William Carey, his wife's father, was a successful merchant 
in the city of New York until about 1S60, when he retired from 
active business, built a residence in Harlem in which he has 
resided since that time; he is now about eighty years of age. 
His wife, Catharine, died in August, 1SS4. 

In 1S68, he ^yas elected school commissioner for Putnam 
county, and held the office for three years, giving general satis- 
faction throughout the county. 

In 1860 or 1861, he was initiated and became a member of 
Philipstown Lodge, No. 236, F. & A. M., at Cold Spring, and 
was thereafter elected its secretary, holding that office for six 
or seven successive years. 

In politics, he has been a democrat since 1862, and as such 
has been elected to the various offices lie has held in his town 
and county. 

Hon. AVilliam Wood. Among the men who have risen to 
high positions of trust and usefulness by their own unaided 
efforts, a prominent place should be given to Judge William 
Wood, who was born in County Down, near Belfast, Ireland, 
August 6th, 1842. His parents, Robert and Jane (Thompson) 
Wood, resolved to emigrate to America when he was yet a 
cliild, and a dim recollection of a spring that flowed by his 
father's door, and of a house that stood on an opposite hill, 
are the only memories that he brought from his native land. 
Upon coming to this country in the spring of 1847, the family 
settled in Cold Spring, and the son obtained his early education 
in the public schools of that village. 

When he had reached a suitable age he was placed as an ap- 
prentice in the works of the West Point Foundry and learned 
the trade of an iron moulder and continued in that business 
till he readied his thirtieth year. 

An accidental circumstance led him to contemplate the study 
of law. Meeting with Samuel Owen, Esq., who was at that 
time the district attorney, and a prominent lawyer, lie was 
urired bv him to enter his office as a law student, and gladly 



244 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

accepted his invitation. In his younger days he had been a 
member of a village debating society, and was distinguished for 
his ready eloquence, and it was one of the employments of his 
boyhood to attend Justices' Courts, and listen to the lawyers, 
as they examined the witnesses and made their pleas. He was 
clerk of the Board of Supervisors in 1873, and upon completing 
his term as a law student he was admitted to the Bar in Sej)- 
tember, 1876. In November of the same year he was elected to 
the office of district attorney, and was twice re-elected, and 
after serving seven years, during which time he enjoyed an ex- 
tensive law practice, resigned the office to enter upon the duties 
of county judge, to which position he was elected in the fall of 
1883. The popularity of Judge Wood was sufficiently attested 
by the fact that he was elected by a majority in every town in 
the county. 

He long held high rank among the masonic fraternity, being 
member of the Lodge, Chapter and Commandery. 

For many years he has been connected with the Presbyterian 
church at Cold Spring, and in all the relations of public and 
private life, there are few citizens who enjoy a higher degree of 
well merited respect and confidence. 

Judge Wood was married in 1875 to Miss Ellen, daughter of 
John and Sarah Groundwater. They are the parents of three 
children; Ellen C, Robert T., and Emily R. 

As a political speaker, Judge Wood has few superiors, and 
during the last two presidential campaigns he was engaged 
by the State committee to deliver addresses in various portions 
of the State. He has also been a frequent delegate to the State 
and Congressional conventions, and as a life long member of the 
republican party his weight and influence are fully recognized 
in its councils. 

SEYiiouK BiKDSALL Nelson, SOU of Elisha Nelson, was born 
in Cold Spring, December 18th, 1843. He was educated at the 
Classical Institute, Tarrytown, and the Hudson River Institute 
at Claverack. He graduated at the Albany Law School in 1866 
with the degree of LL. B., and was admitted to the Bar in the 
same year. He commenced the practice of the law in the office 
of George Gage at Morristown, New Jersey, in 1867, remaining 
there about a year, then removed to New York city where he 
continued to practice al)out a year. For a few years thereafter 
he was not engaged in practice. In 1874 he opened an office at 




//z^. 



/^^^^^..<1_ 



GENERAL HISTORY. 245 

Cold Spring, at which place he still continues in active practice. 
January 11th, 1870, he married Miss Georgianna Carmichael, of 
Cold Spring. They have five children. He has held the office 
of justice of the peace since 1879. 

James Gardiner was born at Cold Spring, Putnam county, 
October 4th, 1842. His parents came to Putnam connty in 1838 
from Ireland. He was educated at the public schools of Cold 
Spring, studied law with C. H, Ferris of same place, and was 
admitted to the Bar in May, 1877. He has practiced in Cold 
Spring since that time. 

Abram J. Miller, third son of John G. and Phebe A. Mil- 
ler, was born in the town of Somers, in the adjoining county of 
Westchester, on the ISth day of January, 1847. His parents 
moved to Carmel, April 1st, following, and he has remained a 
resident of Putnam county since. His boyhood was passed in 
the village of Carmel, where he enjoyed the ordinary advan- 
tages of a country school, until he was about sixteen years of 
age, when, after a year in the public schools of Kew York city, 
he entered the College of the City of New York, at that time 
the Free Academy. After two years. he severed his connection 
with that institution and matriculated at Columbia College Law 
School, where he graduated May 19th, 1869, with the degree of 
LL. B. He located at Brewster, in the summer of that year 
and has since been engaged in the active practice of his profes- 
sion. He was appointed an assistant assessor of Internal Rev- 
enue, in 1870, and when that office was abolished, became a 
deputy collector, which position he held until August, 1SS3. In 
the autumn of 1884, he was elected district attorney of the 
county, which office he holds at present. 

"William Henry Haldane, who was born in the village of 
Cold Spring-on-Hudson, April 21st, 1851, belongs to a family 
prominent in Putnam county for many years. Mr. Haldane 
was graduated from Columbia College in 1872 and began the 
study of the law under direction of the distinguished advocate, 
Everett P. Wheeler, Esq., in New York. At the same time he 
attended lectures in the law school of that institution from which 
he received the degree of LL. B. in 1874, and was admitted to 
the Bar. Since then he has been entirely engaged in the general 
practice of his profession in New York, having stated times for 
attendance at his office in Cold Spring. 



246 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

George Edward Anderson, son of Peter and Mary (Austin) 
Anderson, was born at German Flats, on the Anderson Home- 
stead in the town of Carmel, June 24th. 1853. He was edu- 
cated in the district school and at the State Normal School, 
graduating from the latter in 1878. After teaching one term, he 
commenced the study of law in April, 1874, with Calvin Frost, 
Esq., of Peekskill, N. Y. He graduated at the Albany Law 
School with the degree of LL. B., and was admitted to practice 
in May, 1876. In October of the same year he located at Car- 
mel, N. Y., where he has continued to practice his profes- 
sion ever since, having during all the time occupied an office 
with Hon. Ambrose Ryder. He has been the candidate of the 
democratic party for the offices of member of Assembly and 
district attorney, and was clerk of the Board of Supervisors 
three years. He was married September 6th, 1877, to Eliza, 
daughter of Jesse Agor, of the town of Carmel, and they have 
one son, Jesse Leslie Anderson, born April 28th, 1880. 

Ward B. Teomans, son of Byron A. Yeomans, was born in 
Philipstown, April 24th, 1856. He was educated at Madison 
University and the State Normal School. He studied law with 
Hon. William Wood at Cold Spring and graduated at the Al- 
bany Law achool in May, 1880, with the degree of LL. B., and 
was admitted to the Bar at the same time. In June, 1880, he 
commenced tlie practice of the law at Cold Spring and has con- 
tinued in practice at that place to the present time. He was 
married December 29th, 1882, to Miss Mary F. Morro, daughter 
of Julius Morro, of Brooklyn. 

Frederic Stone Barnuji was born in Southeast, Putnam 
county, N. Y., June 17th, 1858. He was a son of the late Le 
Ray Barnum, of Southeast, and a grandson of the late Judge 
Stone of Patterson. At the age of thirteen he was sent to a 
boarding school at Redding, Conn., and went from there to the 
Chappaqna Institute in Westchester county, N. Y. He was 
prepared foi' college at Amenia Seminary, N. Y., and at Mr. 
Selleck's School, Norwalk, Conn. In 1875, at the age of seven- 
teen, he entered the Freshman class of Columbia College, and 
graduated with the degree of A. B. in 1879. He was one of the 
honor men of that year, and was nominated by the Faculty 
as: " One of the three most faithful and deserving students of 
the graduating class." 

In the fall of 1879 he entered the Columbia Law School, and 




vj^y-c^ <3-<:^^e/-^ -t^ tP, /^ 



<a.y-^i^C^ ^ 



GENERAL HISTORY. 247 

graduated in ISSl, receiving the degree of LL. B. [Cuvi Lande]. 
He was admit;ted to the Bar in Poughkeepsie May 21st, 1881, 
and continued his studies in the office of Close & Robertson, at 
White Plains, N". Y. , until March, 1882, when he opened a law 
office in Brewster, N. Y. In June, 1872, he received the degree 
of M. A. from Columbia College. January 4th, 1884, he was 
appointed by Governor Cleveland, district attorney of Putnam 
county and held the office one year. During his term as district 
attorney, two important criminal trials were successfully con- 
ducted: one being the case of '' The People vs. Chester W. 
Merrick,"' indicted for the murder of Burns, and the other the 
case of " The People ts. James H. Riley," indicted for the mur- 
der of Hannah Sunderlin. Both cases excited great interest, 
and the defense in each was able and vigorous. Merrick was 
found guilty of manslaughter in the first degree, and Riley is 
now serving a life sentence in Sing Sing. 

In the fall of 1884 Mr. Barnum was a canidate for the office 
of district attorney on the democratic ticket, but was defeated 
by Abram J. Miller. In September, 1885, he was a delegate to 
the Saratoga convention which nominated David B. Hill for 
governor. 

ClaytoiN' Ryder, son of Ambrose and Mary M. (Hillyer) 
Ryder, was born in Carmel, February 8th, 1860. He graduated 
at Cornell University in 1879; attended the Columbia Law 
School during the year 1880-81; was admitted to the Bar in the 
following December, and began the practice of law at Carmel in 
January, 1882, M'hich he still continues. 

The following are at the present time living in Putnam 
county and practicing in New York city: 

Ho>'. Hamilton Fish, .jr. To detail within the limits assigned 
us in this volume all that is either important or praiseworthy in 
the life of any individual is impossible. Mere outlines of lives 
in the history of a county famous for its prominent men must 
content us. They of themselves will form a larger production 
than was originally designed. Especially do we feel the depri- 
vation of space in recording the life of Hamilton Fish, jr. 
His steady devotion to the party whose principles he espoused 
entitles him to credit. His remarkable activity in the service 
of Putnam county is worthy of praise. 

Mr. Fish was born at the State capital, April 17th, 1849, 



248 IIISTOIIY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

while his fatlier was governor. In 1857, he accompanied the 
family on an extended European tour which continued some 
years. This was of great advantage to the young man in his 
studies, as it enabled him to combine experience with research. 
In 1869 he graduated from Columbia College. His father had 
just entered the cabinet of President Grant as secretary of 
State. Mr. Fish became his private secretary and remained in 
his service till 1871, when he entered the Law School of 
Columbia College. He graduated two years later and has since 
practiced his profession in New York city. 

His political services since the time of his graduation have 
been almost continuous. From 1873 to 1874 he served as aide 
de camp on the staff of Gen. Dix, then governor of New York. 
During 1874-76-77-78 and 79 he represented Putnam county in 
the Legislature. Here he won the reputation and popularity 
as a political leader which he now enjoys. For the greater por- 
tion of his term at Albany he was chairman of the committee on 
cities. Many of the reform measures for the city of New York 
were intrusted to his care and the manner in which he treated 
them is highly creditable. 

Mr. Fish has been for many years chairman of the Republi- 
can County Committee of Putnam county. His careful man- 
agement of its affairs led to his appointment in 1884 as a dele- 
gate to the national convention at Chicago. At the beginning 
of his political career he found Putnam a strongly democratic 
county. The change which has taken place is largely due to 
Mr. Fish's efforts. The county is now republican. 

The inheritor of a time honored name, his education and as- 
sociations prompt him to guard it jealously. Depending on 
the advocacy of measiires effecting permanent benefit, his polit- 
ical fame is built upon a lasting foundation. The advantages 
enjoyed by Mr. Fish. in his educational facilities, the advice 
and instruction of a father whose name is familiar wherever 
American history is known, his constant association from early 
childhood with the greatest men of the times, and the rich 
store of experience gained in his various travels, have eminently 
fitted him for the positions he has already held, as well as for 
higher ones in the future. 

Mr. Fish married, April 2Sth, 1880, Emily M., daughter of 
the late Hon. Francis N. Mann, of Troy, X. Y. They have two 
daughters. 




^Aja^ocix^^^^^^ '^<^ 




GKNERAL HISTORY. 249 

Hox. Robert A. Livingston. One of the most promi- 
nent of Putnam county's citizens is Robert A. Living- 
ston. Though still a young man, his ample wealth, high social 
standing, and remarkable abilit}' as a jurist have won for him 
a popularity and a position in tlie county, which are hardly 
equaled by any. 

Mr. Livingston is the senior member of the firm of Livingston 
& Olcott, at No. 4 Warren street. New York city, which is well 
known in real estate circles, and in the civil courts. He was 
born in New York city, February 6th, 1854, and is from the 
family whose history, as manorial proprietors in the days of the 
Dutch governors, is familiar to the American people all over the 
world. Among the many members of the family whose names 
have been handed down to fame are: John Livingston (born in 
1603), the common ancestor of the family, and a lineal descend- 
ant of the fifth Lord Livingston, ancestor of " the Earls of Lin- 
lithgo" and Callender, in Scotland, who was an energetic 
preacher of the Reformed Church in Scotland, and was ban- 
ished in 1663, for nonconformity to prelatical rule: Philip, who 
was a signer of the Declaration of Independence; William, who . 
was governor of New Jersey; Brockholst, a prominent soldier 
and jurist; Robert R., a jirominent statesman and member of 
the First Continental Congress, also Chancellor of the State of 
New York, and the man who administered the oath of office to 
George Washington, the first president of the United States: 
Edward, a brother of the preceding, mayor of New York city. 
United States district attorney for the State of New York, sec- 
retary of State for the United States, and who was the author 
of the Criminal Code; and John H. Livingston, D.D., the well 
known theologian. 

Mr. Livingston was prepared for college at Grammar school 
No. 35, and by private tutors. After graduating from Colum- 
bia, in the class of 1876, he for two years pursued a course of 
study in the law school of that institution. On graduating 
from there he entered upon the practice of his profession, serv- 
ing for a time a clerkship in the office of Knox & Mason. 
Much of his knowledge of law was imparted to him by his 
•uncle, the venerable and respected jurist, Charles O'Conor. 
Acfing under his advice, he only appeared during the first years 
of his practice in assigned cases in the higher criminal courts. 

Among the many famous criminal cases which Mr. Livingston 



250 HISTORY OF PUTJfAM COUNTY. 

has been called upon to manage, was that of George Melius, 
the rear brakeman on the train which was wrecked in the Spuy- 
ten Duyvil disaster, at which, it will be remembered, Senator 
Wagner lost his life. Melius was charged with manslaughter, 
and though advised by many older lawyers that the case was a 
hopeless one, Mr. Livingston undertook its defense. At the 
trial he showed that the rear brakeman, though supposed by 
one set of rules to go back and signal a following train, if the 
train came to a stop, was, however, first compelled to make a 
report to his conductor. Mr. Livingston claimed that it was 
while obeying this rule that the accident occurred, and by so 
doing procured an acquittal. At another lime he defended 
Alexander Armstrong, an old colored servant of the family of 
Cambridge Livingston. Armstrong was on trial for arson in 
the first degree. The prosecution proved that he had repeat- 
edly threatened to set on fire a tenement house in which he 
lived. It was also shown by a colored clergyman and his wife 
that Armstong on the night of the fire threw a lamp up to the 
ceiling, and tlius set fire to his room. Mr. Livingston proved 
that the clergyman had served a term of years in Sing Sing for 
assault, and that on the night in question he and his wife 
attacked the accused and that in the scuflie the lamp was ui^set. 
As a consequence, Armstrong was acquitted. 

These and many other cases, Mr. Livingston has managed 
with remarkable success "and he now stands in the first rank 
among the lawyers of the day. 

Mr. Livingston has also paid considerable attention to poli- 
tics. He is a republican and has been twice elected to the 
Assembly as the representative of Putnam county, he being a 
resident of Garrisons. He was at one time a prominent candi- 
date for the speakership and has an exceedingly clear record in 
the House. He is looked upon as an honest, fearless and able 
legislator. 

Mr. Livingston has received the degrees of A.B.. LL.B. and 
M.A., and is a member of the New York Bar Association. He 
is greatly respected throughout the county in which he lives, 
and by the profession of which he is such an able representa- 
tive. 





1^lJ0i^n^(j ^^Lco^i'La^tin'^ 



CHAPTER XYII. 

THE MEDICAL HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

BY J. Q. ADAMS, M. D. 

Dr. Robert Weeks.— Ebenezer Fletcher.— Daniel Reed.— William G. Hopkins. — 
Aaron Carman.— Noah Hill Crane.— Dr. Howland.— Frederick Fletcher.- 
Ebenezer F. Boyd.— Dr. Barnum.— Asher Gilbert.— Dr. Adams.— Dr. Board- 
man.— Edward Crosby.— J. Homer Smith.— Frederick D. Lente.— Ira H. 
Walker.— Edward B. Turner.— Joseph H. Bailey.— Daniel Bull.— John Ham- 
ilton.— Joseph C. Crane.— J. Q. Adams.— Addison Ely.— Nathan W. Wheeler. 
—Jonathan F. Seeley.— Austin La Monte.— George W. Murdock. — Jared G. 
Wood.— Lewis H. Miller.- Edson Card, jr.— James Hadden. — Ernest Hebr- 
smith. — Jledical Societies. 

I]SI order to form a just appreciation of the subject, it will 
be necessary to contrast the past with the present; the 
time when there were few medical colleges in this country, and 
now when they abound in the land; when medical books were 
scarce, the best medical library being worth less than $100, and 
now, when medical libraries count their thousands of volumes; 
when it took a week to go from New York to Boston; now the 
journey is performed in a few hours; when there were in this 
country but few roads, and those in wretched condition, upon 
which a carriage was scarcely seen, travelling being upon horse- 
back; now, riding at ease in fine carriages, with fine horses, 
through a country dotted with villages, and hamlets; then 
when there were but few hospitals or opportunities for clinical 
study; now, when such facilities create unbounded rivalries 
which degenerate into systems of trade; then when there were 
but few medical men in this country, and those riding into two 
or three towns, encountering great trials and hardships; now 
with a superliuity. 

Then a physician received a preparation that would now be 
thought insufficient to admit one to practice, for his medical 



252 niSTOKY OF putxam county. 

education was such as he could pick up while servinc? an ap- 
prenticeship to some noted practitioner, during which he com- 
bined the duties of a student with many of the menial offices of 
a servant. 

No practice was to be seen but by the laborious mode of visit- 
ing the sick at their respective abodes, the infancy of our 
country not admitting of the establishment of hospitals, while 
the false delicacy of the people allowed no advantages from dis- 
section. Says McMasters: "He ground the powders, mixed 
the pills, rode with the doctor on his rounds, held the basin 
when the patient was bled, helped to adjust plasters, to sew 
wounds and run with vials of medicine from one end of town to 
the other. His apprenticeship ended, the half educated lad 
returned to his native town to assume practice. Sunshine and 
rain, daylight and darkness were alike to him. He would ride 
ten miles on the darkest night over the worst of roads, in a 
pelting storm, to administer a dose of calomel to an old woman, 
or to attend a child in a fit." 

For his services he seldom received money. He was glad to 
get corn, oats, potatoes, a few hoop poles, a jag of wood for his 
fireplace or the thanks of his patrons. He was present at 
every birth, he attended every burial, he sat with the minister at 
every death-bed, and put his name with the lawyer to every 
will. 

The use of anesthetics was then unknown. The inhalation 
of ether or chloroform for producing insensibility was not 
known till 1846. Physiology was in its infancy, and pathology, 
as a science, was unknown. 

Not one of the many remedies which destroy disease, which 
hold in check the most loathsome maladies, and the most violent 
epidemics, was in use. 

The anticeptic method of treating open wounds, known as 
Listerism, was first practiced by Joseph Lister of Edinburgh, 
Scotland, in 1S7-1. 

Vaccination was then also unknown. It was not until about 
1763 that Edward Jenners' attention was first called to the sub- 
ject of prevention of small pox, his experiments extending over 
a period of thirty-three years before his discovery was recog- 
nized and established, which was in 1796. 

Dk. Robert Weeks was born in Tonimyhawk Street, West- 
chester county, in 1772. He studied medicine with Dr. Elias 



GENERAL HISTORY. 253 

Cornelius of Westchester county, and graduated at the Medical 
Department of Columbia College, New York city, in 1793. 
Soon after graduating he came to Carmel — probably in 1794— 
where he practiced twenty-two years, when he died in 1816 at 
the age of 4-lr. Dr. Weeks practiced here several years before 
this was Putnam county, and was very largely instrumental in 
having the several towns of Dutchess set off as Putnam county. 
He was in the Legislature at the time the act was passed. 

Dr. Ebenezer Fletcher was born in Pound Ridge, West- 
chester county, in the year 1774. He commenced the practice 
of medicine and surgery in Patterson in the early part of this 
century. He was a short, well built, red faced man, active, 
energetic, and of great decision of character. His medical and 
surgical knowledge was above the average of his contemporaries. 
He performed many surgical operations successfully, was ever 
ready to go at the call of the sick, whether poor or rich, in win- 
ter or summer, cold or wet, and for nearly fifty years did an ex- 
tensive practice in the towns of Patterson, Kent and Southeast. 
He died in Patterson in 1852 at the age of 78. 

Dr. Da^s'iel Reed located in Southeast sometime in the 
latter part of the eighteenth century, after the close of the 
Revolutionary War. He was a large, portly man with counte- 
nance beaming with benevolence, kindness and good will. 

His early medical education might have been limited but his 
large experience in all forms of disease for fifty years and his 
frequent consultations wdth his medical brethren made him a 
wise and successful practitioner, while his self confidence, genial 
manner and decision won the confidence and love of his patients. 
He always rode on horseback with large saddle-bags well filled, 
and a pipe ever in his mouth. 

In serious cases he was in no haste and frequently remained 
for hours and sometimes days, and his presence was so gracious 
and inspiring that it seemed to be a good medicine in itself. 
His ride was extensive and his pay small and often nothing. 
It was said that Putnam county owed him 810,000 for gratu- 
itous services. 

Du. William G. Hopkins was born June 29th, 1788, on the farm 
un the hill about one mile south of the village of Carmel, then 
owned and occupied by his father, Thatcher Hopkins. He lived 
on the farm with his father until of age, when he began the 
study of medicine with Dr. Ebenezer White of the village of 



254 HISTORY OF put:^am couxty. 

Somers, Westchester county, and continued studying with Dr. 
White until he attended lectures in the Medical Department of 
the University of New York in the year 1810. Among the pro- 
fessors were J. Augustin Smith, '\'alentine Mott and John Bard. 
He received his license to practice from the Medical Society of 
the County of Westchester in the year 1811, Dr. Munson Smith 
being president, and AVilliam H. Sackett secretary of the so- 
ciety. He practiced medicine with Dr. Robert Weeks of Car- 
mel village for some time. 

He was married June 80th, 1813, to Elizabeth, daughter of 
Hon. Joel Frost of the town of Carmel. In 1814 he settled on a 
farm about four miles south of Carmel on the road leading to 
the village of Somers, where he continued in the practice of 
medicine for twenty-nine years. 

He then sold his farm and moved to the village of Carmel, 
where he lived three years. Then he moved to the village of 
Peekskill in Westchester county, continuing his practice until 
near his death which occurred September Sth, 1870. 

Dr. Aaron Carman was born February 25th. 1798, in 
Philipstown, then Dutchess county, now Putnam Valley, Put- 
nam county. His preliminary education was obtained in Put- 
nam Valley. He studied medicine from 1817 to 1819, with his 
cousin, Dr. Samuel Carman, at Pleasant Valley, east of Pough- 
keepsie, Dutchess county; also with Dr. James Fountain from 
1819 to 1821 in Jefferson Valley, Westchester county. He at- 
tended lectures at the College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
New York city, in 1821 and 1822, where he graduated May 
2oth, 1822. 

He commenced the practice of medicine in Lancaster, Pa., 
where he remained only nine months, when he moved to the 
Highlands, Putnam county, where he practiced two years. He 
then located at Lake Mahopac, where he practiced fifty-eight 
years. 

He was made a member of the Westchester County Medical 
Society April IGth, 1S22. He became a member of the old 
Medical Society of tlie County of Putnam February 6th, 1828. 

He was married to Hannah Lane, daughter of Nathan Lane, 
of Putnam Valley, January Sth, 1823, and to his second wife, 
Mary H. Biggs, widow of Daniel Biggs, and daughter of 
Stephen D. Bailey, December 4th, 1861. He died at Lake 
Maliopac in 1882, at the age of 84. Relatives surviving him 



GENERAL HISTORY. 255 

are his wife, Mary H. Carman, and liis daughter, Mary S. Car- 
man. 

Dr. No.vii Hill Cr.vxe was born in Carmel in 1787. He was 
the son of Joseph and Chloe Hill Crane. He studied medi- 
cine with Dr. Elias Cornelius in Tommyhavvk street, West 
Somers, Westchester county; also with Dr. John Cornelius 
of iS"ew York city, and graduated at the College of Physi- 
cians and Surgeons in Is'ew York city. He practiced for a 
time there, and finally came to Carmel, where he practiced 
until about the time of his death. 

Soon after coming to Carmel, he married Susan Warring. 
Dr. Crane was held in high esteem for his knowledge of medi- 
cine, his skill in detecting disease, and his success in the treat- 
ment of different cases. 

He lived on the Warring homestead, now the Smalley House, 
until a short time before his death, when he went to the old 
homestead two miles south of Carmel village, where he died in 
1S36 at the age of 49 years. 

Dr. Howland was born of Quaker parentage in Pawling, 
Dutchess county, in the year 1786. He practiced medicine in 
Patterson for several years, where he died at the age of 57 
years. 

Dr. Frederick Fletcher, son of Dr. Ebenezer Fletcher, 
practiced medicine in Patterson several years between 1838 and 
1850, then went West and died at St. Paul, Minn. 

Dr. Ebenezer F. Boyd was born in Fishkill, Dutchess 
county, July Gth, 1812. He attended the school of the Eev. E. 
P. Benedict in Patterson, after which he read medicine with his 
father, William D. Boyd, M. D., at the homestead in Fishkill. 
He attended lectures at the University Medical College and 
graduated in 1834. 

He commenced the practice of medicine in the village of Cold 
Spring immediately after graduating and there remained until 
his death which occurred December 21st, 18S9, at the age of 27 
years. 

Soon after making his home in Cold Spring he married Caro- 
line Colwell of Fishkill, by whom he had one child, a son, who 
is now living in Oswego in this State. Dr. Boyd was doubtless 
a member of the old County Medical Society. 

Dr. Edward Crosby writes: '-The physicians of Carmel in 
their order as I remember them: 



256 HISTOUY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

"Dr. Barnctm lived where Benjamin D.Crane's house now 
stands; his office was the brick part attached to that house. 

"Dr. AsHER Gilbert, student of Dr. Nehemiah Perry, of 
Ridgeiield, Conn., lived where the late Mr. Jas. D. Little's 
house now stands. 

" He was a very creditable practitioner and could have com- 
manded a good practice in his profession, but, alas! he was a 
victim of intemperance. 

"He died at his brother's, Dr. Wheeler Gilbert, inBeekman, 
Dutchess county, about 1838. 

"Dr. Adams lived at the old Warring place now Smalley 
House. He was there only two or three years, and died there. 

" Dr. BoARDMAN came to Carmel about 1835. lived, I think, in 
the Charles Minor house, was there some four or five years and 
I think went back to New Milford, Conn., where he came from." 

Dr. Edward Crosby writes: "Now when I come to write 
of my own career in Carmel I cannot think of very much to 
say. All my early life associations, .social and religious, are 
centered about Carmel, of,the old Gilead church and society more 
especially, the recollections are truly pleasant. 

" Nor can I say any less of my professional relations with my 
brethren of the medical staff. If there ever has been any chaf- 
ing. between brethren, they had the wisdom to not allow even 
the smoke to be seen in the air. I commenced my medical life 
by reading medicine with my uncle, the late Noah H. Crane, in 
1885. 

"After his death I read with Dr. Howland of Patterson, and 
also, while teaching, with Dr. Lewis H. White of Fishkill. 

"In 1837 and 1838 I attended a partial course of lectures in 
New Haven: Anatomy, by Prof. Night, Chemistry by Prof. B. 
Silliman, Materia Medica and Therapeutics by Prof. Tully, and 
Practice of Medicine by Prof. Ives. 

" I also attended two full courses at Jefferson Medical Col- 
lege, Philadelphia, and graduated March 6th, 1840. With 
gratitude and thanksgiving for my successes and with sorrow 
for my failures, I have attended on the calls for my jjrofessional 
services tliese 40 years." 

Dr. Homer Smith was born on the 9th of July, ISll, in 
Washington, Conn. He was a son of Amos Smith and a de- 
scendant of John Sn)ith,\vho came from England in November, 
1G4S. Dr. Smith, after ol:)taining an academical education at 



GENERAL HISTORY. 257 

Litchfield Academy, Conn., and other institutions, commenced 
the study of medicine with Dr. Cooper of Poughkeepsie, and 
after pursuing the usual course of study was licensed to prac- 
tice medicine and surgery by the Dutchess County Medical 
Society. 

He commenced the practice of medicine in Southeast in De- 
cembex-, 1840, and was assiduously devoted to ihe duties of his 
profession up to the time of his death from typho malarial 
fever, December 27th, 1884, at the age of 73 years. Dr. Smith 
was married to Miss H. 0. Knapp in 1869, who with two chil- 
dren survives him. 

Frederick D. Lente, A. M., M. D.' '-So rapidly tiy the 
hours that it is vvell to pause occasionally amid our haste and 
labors to note the changes that they bring. 

" This very evening a paper was to have been presented before 
this Academy by our esteemed associate, Dr. Frederick D. 
Lente. 

" It is my painful duty to announce that the appointment 
will not be kept. Again the remorseless scythe has been at 
work, and under the shadows of the Highlands, amid the scenes 
of busy and eventful years, our honored friend is sleeping the 
immortal sleep. 

" In many respects Dr. Lente' s professional career was anoma- 
lous, as his charactei- was remarkable. 

" What our specific duty is, in the equation of life, must, 
from the very nature of things, ever remain a vaiying quantity. 
Our estimate of our personal duty, however, depends largely, 
if not chiefly, upon our personal capabilities of estimating the 
specific work required of us. Working simply for the work's 
sake — to kill time — however laudable the work may be, is not 
our idea of the highest devotion to duty. Our highest idea of 
duty is the highest conception of duty of which one's mind is 
capable. 

"He who has always lived in the valleys and has never trod 
the mountain tops can have but a meagre appreciation of un- 
folding panoramas of sleeping lakes and nestling villages, and 
the broadening far-olf prospect beyond the hills. As he ascends. 
thougHi, from one altitude to another, and his vision takes in 
a wider survey, his conceptions of 'the far off, unattained. and 

' A ilemorial read before the New York Academy of Medicine. Xoveniber Isr. 
188;i, by T. Herring Burchard, A. .^I.. il. D. 
17 



258 HisTour OF putxam countt. 

dim ' become changed, and vague surmises now give place to 
actual knowledge. But, as we ascend the horizon recedes; 
' Hills peep o'er hills, and Alps o'er Alps arise,' and so to those 
choice minds of highest attainment are given broader vistas and 
wider fields for the employment of noble and generous deeds. 
And ever, as these adventurous climbers ascend, their eyes are 
gladdened and their hearts are cheered with loftier aspirations. 
Humanity rolls like a mighty ocean, at their feet, and, though 
cold its waters and unfathomable its mysteries, they press 
higher and higher to fire the beacon lights. 

'•Dr. Lente, modest, unpretentious, gentle as he was, stood 
on the very mounrain top, and from his exalted observation 
took in a broad conception of life, with all its incidental duties 
and obligations. Extreme conscientiousness might well be predi- 
cated of him as his predominant characteristic. Never have T 
met the man whose regard for truth was so immutable. The 
keenest justice, even in most trivial matters, governed in all his 
dealings. Honor was dearer to him than life. His professional 
obligations to his patients, his sense of professional responsi- 
bility he regarded as but second to his accountability to God. 
Sensitive of the rights of others as he was of his own integrity, 
neither intimidation nor reward could swerve him from his own 
high sense of right. 

"Slander and vituperation, ever venomous, ever foul, sink 
infinitely beneath contempt when incited by professional jeal- 
ousy, bigotry, and pique. The vicious intolerance breathed 
against Dr. Lente at Saratoga, while it failed to seriously annoy 
him, did awaken his j^rofound mortification that in his profes- 
sion such narrow-mindedness and illiberality could be found. 

''Life with Dr. Lente meant work; to him it was full of 
achievable possibilities. Indefatigable as a student, retiring 
late and rising early, he turned to profit the midnight hours. 
Mere physical fatigue was no excuse with him for mental inac- 
tivity. So, when his tired limbs refused to carry him, often 
have I found him, late at night or in the early morning, bol- 
stered in his bed, surrounded with his books and periodicals. 

"All that he did was done with rare thoroiighness. Dis- 
daining ostentatious display, and depreciating superficiary, 
the purpose of his studies was to make himself the master of 
his subject. Access to his thoughts meant more than mere in- 
tellectual acquaintance. His mind was a living Thesaurus of 




e<^t^3~~ 



"// 



GENERAL HISTORY. 259 

information, facts, and theories, gathered with great discrimina- 
tion from the widest domains of science and the arts. And 
yet, studeat as he was, his studies never led him into devious 
and idle speculation. He was extremely practical in all he did. 
Physically delicate, but with powers of endurance that were 
phenomenal, with an energy that was untiring, and a devotion 
to duty that was sublime, he brought to the practice of his pro- 
fession a mind of richest and most varied acquisitions, an ex- 
perience that was remarkable for its variety and scope, and 
a heart ever mellowed with kindliness and good cheer. As a 
diagnostician he was painstaking, thorough, and exact. Hap- 
hazard diagnosis he deplored, and no opportunity for brilliant 
display ever tempted him into the hasty expression of an im- 
mature opinion. As a therapeutist, his intimate acquaintance 
with drugs and his extensive studies in physiological medica- 
tion made him, at once, skillful and distinguished. As a prac- 
titioner, his fertility of expedients is illustrated in numerous 
inventions, formulae, and instruments in general professional 
use. In the widest sense of the word he was the good physi- 
cian—skillful, devoted, self-sacrificing. Indifferent to his own 
infirmities, and oblivious of his personal comfort, he brought 
to his patient's relief a strong brain, a ripe experience, a tender 
heart. As a scholar, he was an active or honorary member of 
most of the leading societies. He was one of the founders and 
an early president of the American Academy of Medicine, and 
a frequent contributor to cun'ent popular or professional journ- 
alism. Whatever came from his pen commanded attention. 
His most important contributions were his papers on 'The 
Treatment of Intermittent Fever by the Hypodermic Injection 
of Quinine,' ' The Sedative Action of Calomel in Disease,' 'Intra- 
uterine Medication,' etc. 

"Dr. Lente was born in Newbern, N. C, in 1823. He gradu- 
ated from the University of North Carolina in 1845. He studied 
medicine in the office of our distinguished confrei'e, Professor 
Alfred C. Post, and graduated from the Medical Department of 
the New York University in 1849. During the following two 
years he served as house surgeon under Valentine Mott in 
the New York Hospital. In 1851, having been appointed sur- 
geon to the West Point Foundry, the doctor removed to Cold 
Spring, where, in 1853, he married Mary, the accomplished 
daughter of William Kemble, Esq. 



260 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

" Mrs. Lente, one son and three daughters survive him. 

" Dr. Lente' s professional career at Cold Spring was one of 
remarkal)le success. His reputation as consultant and surgeon 
reached literally from New York to Albany. So highly prized 
were the practical advantages of Dr. Lente' s office that a popu- 
lar question among New York and Bellevue Hospital men 
once was: 'After leaving the hospital, is it Cold Spring or 
Europe.' 

" In 1870 the doctor received and accepted the appointment 
as professor of gynfecology in the Medical Department of the 
New York University and assistant surgeon to the Women's 
Hospital. After a year's arduous service in the city, inter- 
rupted by numerous professional calls up the Hudson, he re- 
turned to his former home, where he continued in active prac- 
tice until failing health compelled him to seek a more genial 
climate. 

'' Eelinquishing a lucrative practice, he betook himself to 
Palatka, Fla., for the winter, and to Saratoga for the summer 
months. 

" It was at the latter place, and after a season of unusual 
activity and fatigue, that he was taken ill with cerebro-spiual 
meningitis. Fortunately he was able to return to his family at 
Cold Spring, where, on the 11th of October, in the sixtieth 
year of his age, he peacefully breathed his last. 

"And thus ends the record of a noble man. He dignified his 
manhood by his consistent Christian life, and to his profession 
he added luster and renown." 

Dk. Ira Henophan Walker was born in Roxbury, Conn., 
in 1810. He studied medicine with Dr. Seth Shove of Bedford, 
Westchester county, N. Y., commencing about 1830 or 1831. 

March 6th, 1S35, he was licensed to practice medicine by the 
Connecticut Medical Society, and March 1st, 1836, he graduated 
from Yale College. In February, 1836, he came to Carmel, and 
began practice. In August, 1S37, he was commissioned surgeon's 
mate of the 61st Regiment of Infantry of the State Militia, by Hon. 
William L. Marcy, governor and commander-in-chief of all the 
miliria at our city of Albany, the 10th of i^ugust, 1837. Dr. 
Walker in his profession stood above the average of his con- 
temporaries, and was highly esteemed in social circles. During 
his brief medical life he was an honor to the profession, and 
the communitv in which he lived. 



GENERAL HISTOKY. 261 

He died in Carmel, N. Y., of typhoid fever, in 1839, at the 
age of 29 years. His only surviving relative so far as known is 
Emily Walker Sloat, only child of Dr. Walker, and wife of 
William H. H. i^loat of Carmel village. Mrs. Sloat has three 
children, one son and two daughters. 

Dk. Edward B. Tur:s-ee was born in Roxbury, Delaware 
county, ]S. \'., May oth, 1851, where he received his preliminary 
education. 

After reading medicine for a time in the office of two or 
three practicing physicians, he attended his first course of 
lectures at Harvard Medical College in 1872 and 1873. 

He graduated at Bellevue Medical College in 1874. Soon 
after graduating he settled in Montrose, Westchester county, 
N. Y., where he remained in practice two years, when on ac- 
count of threatened failure of his health, he removed to Lake 
Mahopac in May, 1876. He remained there with varying 
changes of health until his death which occurred August 2d, 
1885, at the age of 34 years. 

Of his success as a practitioner, and his judgment as a physi- 
cian it may be said that he was above the average. In medical 
practice he was seldom found in the wrong and in surgery 
he possessed unusual tact and ability. 

Dr. Joseph Hayward Bailey was born in Fredericktown, 
Dutchess county, N. Y., October 20th, 1803. He studied medi- 
cine with his father, Dr. Rowland Bailey, and graduated at 
Rutger Medical College, New York city, in 1S27. From 1827 
to 1830 he practiced medicine in Kent with his father. He then 
went to New York city where he practiced with his brother 
Benjamin Bailey until 1834, when he was appointed assistant 
surgeon U. S. Array. He retired from active service in 1862. 
He died at Kent Clilfs in 1882 at the age of 79 years. 

Dr. Da>'iel Bull was a practicing physician in the South 
Precinct of Dutchess county as early as 1772. During the 
Revolution he was a tory and was one of the men who were 
arrested, and whose papers Avere signed by Col. Ludington by 
order of the Provincial Congress. He had a daughter, Cornelia, 
who married Joseph C. Field, who was a member of the Le2:is,- 
lature in 1803. 

\Qii. Joii^- Hamilton was a physician and was living on south 
sidt, ^f Lake Mahopac at " Hoquets Point'' in 1780. No 
further mention is made of him. 



262 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

Db. Joseph Crane. See history of Crane family. 

Dr. J. Q. Adams" was born in Riishford, Alleghany county, 
N. Y., December 31st,' 1S27. When six months old he went 
with his i)arents, John and Huldah Adams, to the old home- 
stead in Cavendish. Windsor county, Vt., where his grand- 
father, Timothy Adams, was then living. This family is de- 
scended from Henry Adams who came from England in 1640 
with seven sons, and from them are descended the illustrious 
family of that name whose names and deeds are no small part 
of our nation's history. 

The early education of Dr. Adams was obtained at Black 
River Academy, Ludlow, Yt., and in the spring of 1848 he com- 
menced the study of medicine with Dr. A. Lowell of Chester, 
Vt. Here, to use his own expression, he remained until October, 
■ spoiling the doctor's spatulas by heating them in the stove to 
spread plasters with, breaking his graduated measures, and 
wasting his medicines by blunders in making pills. He then 
went to the Vermont Medical College at Woodstock, and re- 
mained one year. In the summer of 1849 he attended a course 
of lectures at Berkshire Medical College, Pittstield, Ma:^:,., and 
in the autumn went to New York and matriculat•^' in the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons, and attended ' .ctures 
and hospital practice two years. In 1852 Dr. Adams went as 
surgeon on the ship " Henry Clay " to England, and while the 
vessel remained in port he embraced the opportunity to increase 
his knowledge of the profession by attending lectures and hos- 
pital practice. 

Upon returning to New Y^ork he practiced for a few months 
and through an accidental acquaintance he was induced to come 
to Carmel in the early part of 1853, and decided to make that 
place his permanent residence. 

The breaking out of the Civil War found Dr. Adams prompt 
to aid in the cause of the Union, and in August, 1862, he was 
appointed surgeon of the 172d Regiment N. Y. Volunteers, then 
organizing at Yonkers. 

This regiment, however, failed to complete the number of 
men, and was consolidated with another which was already 
supplied with a surgeon, and the doctor was relieved in con- 
sequence. ^ 

He then went to visit friends at Fort McHenry, Baltimore, 

'By Wm. S. Pelletieau. 




■/ ^/ /,/y -*' 




3../^^^^^^-^^ /^. ^ 



GENERAL HISTORY. 263 

and from that place went to the army then between Falmouth 
and Bell Plain, Va. In January, 1863, he returned to Wash- 
ington, and applied to the War Department for a position in the 
U. S. Volunteer Corps of surgeons. His application was suc- 
cessful, and he was appointed to duty in Finley Hospital in 
Washington. In due time he was commissioned assistant sur- 
geon with the rank of 1st Lieut, from the 27th day of February, 
1S63. The commission was signed by Abraham Lincoln and the 
doctor justly considers it as one of his choicest treasures from 
the labor it cost to obtain it and to execute its duties, and for 
the signature of the illustrious man attached to it. 

In April, 1863, he was ordered to report for duty to Brig. 
Gen. Carleton, commanding the Department of New Mexico at 
Santa Fe. Accordingly he travelled by rail to Kansas City, and 
then embarked on an old fashioned thorough brace stage 
drawn by four horses, and with nine passengers as companions, 
started on a long and dangerous journey of 1,300 miles. At 11 
o'clock at night they were startled by a summons to halt, and 
found themselves surrounded by a band of Quantrell's Guerillas. 
The passengers were quietly ordered to alight, and were soon 
dispossessed of their many valuables, excepting one woman 
whom the brigands chivalrously allowed to depart with all her 
property, unharmed, while the male passengers were held 
prisoners in a dry goods store of which the guerillas had taken 
possession. The doctor's profession was no protection to him, 
and his trunk was quickly pillaged, and all the contents scat- 
tered, and divided among the " Jay Hawks," as this class of 
robbers were then called. After being left in durance vile for 
two hours they were released by the departure of the guerillas, 
who took with them the stage horses, and the driver was com- 
pelled to borrow more, and on resuming their journey they 
found at the next station a Union soldier who had been shot by 
the gang and was dying. At another place they found a house 
where the inmates had been compelled to provide food for the 
robbers and were then robbed of what little they possessed. 

After a succession of such adventures he at length reached 
Santa Fe, and reporting to the general he was assigned to duty 
at the military post of Los Graces, and proceeded thither by 
stage a distance of 300 miles, and arrived on the 1st of June, 
finding the hospital a large and commodious building, and the 



264 IIISTOIIY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

place one of coini)arative comfort after liis hardships and trials, 
although the mercury rose to 110 degrees every afternoon. 

At this place he remained five months, and on the 1st of 
November was ordered to report to Capt. Whitlock, command- 
ing at Quince River, seventy-five miles from Los Cruces, and on 
the divide of the Rocky Mountains. Here he found many 
things of interest while investigating the ruins that remained 
of the vanished race of the Aztecs. 

In September 1S64, he was ordered to accompany an expedition 
with 200 men under Col. Davis through the southern borders of 
Arizona, and the northern part of Mexico. On this expedition 
they spent two months, and upon their return he was ordered 
to Fort Stanton, where he remained until July, 1865. It was 
here that he heard of the death of President Lincoln, one month 
after its occurrence. In July, 1S65, he was ordered to Fort 
Bliss, Texas, and reported in August. While here he received 
the commission of brevet surgeon with rank of major, dated 
March 13th, 1865. December 9th, 1S65, the war being ended, he 
was discharged from the service. Returning to Los Cruces he 
engaged in jmvate practice until the last of March, 1866, and 
then set out on horseback with a merchant train for the States, 
and after a difficult and perilous journey reached Kansas City 
and in June came to Washington, D. C. 

In November, 1866, Dr. Adams returned to Carmel and re- 
sumed his practice which he has since continued. 

He married Miss Sarah L. Spaulding of Proctorsville, Yt., 
August 15th, 1853; she died in December, 1867. 

In February, 1870, he was married a second time to Miss 
Helen V. Smith of Chester, Tt. Their children were: John 
Quincy Adams, born March 26th, 1878, and Florence, boim No- 
vember 2Sth, 1880, The latter died July 7th, 1881. 

Dr. Adams is a prominent member of the Putnam County 
Medical Society and is also a member of the Medical Society of 
the State of New York. In his practice in this county he is 
popular and enjoys a large share of the public confidence and 
esteem. 

He is surgeon of Crosby Post, No. 302, G. A. R.; a Master 
Mason, and now holds the office of junior warden in the lodge; 
a Royal Arch Mason, and holds the office of scribe in the 
chapter; a Knight Templar, and a thirty-two degree ]Mason, 
being a member of four bodies of Ancient Scottish Rite Masonry, 




^■'^^'tLu^^ 



GEl^ERAL HISTORY. 265 

meeting in the Masonic Temple of New York State, in New 
York city. 

Dr. Addison Ely, of Carmel, N. Y., was born at Westfield, 
Mass., in 1814, and was a son of Elihu Ely and grandson of 
Captain Levi Ely of West Springfield, Mass., who was killed at 
the battle of Mohawk in October, 1780, in the Revolutionary 
War. 

Dr. Ely, after obtaining an academical education at Green- 
ville, N. Y., and Williamstown, Mass., and pursuing the usual 
course of the study of medicine under Dr Abbott of Westfield, 
Mass., Dr. Baily of Kingston, N. J., and Dr. J. S. Fountain, of 
Yorktown, N. Y., and attending a course of lectures at the 
Berkshire Medical College, Mass., was licensed to practice 
medicine and surgery by the Massachusetts State Medical 
Society. 

He afterward attended a course of lectures at the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, N. Y., at the N. Y. Hospital, etc. 

After practicing for three yeai'S in New York city he located 
in Carmel in 1838, where by his devotion to his profession and 
his success as a general practitioner — particularly in diseases of 
the chest and diseases of children — he secured an extensive 
practice which he was able to retain until age and impaired 
health prevented his attending to it. Dr. Ely was for fifteen 
years examining surgeon for the U. S. Pension Department, and 
for many years physician to the County Almshouse, and is now 
one of the censors of the County Medical Society. He was mar- 
ried in 1834 to Hannah, daughter of Ephraim and Rachel 
(Osborn) Wright, of Somerstown, Westchester county, N. Y., 
with whom he is still living in Carmel. 

Dr. Nathan W. Weeler, who is one of the oldest and best 
known physicians of Putnam county, was born in the town of 
Easton, Fairfield county. Conn., December 2-2d, 181.5. His pa- 
rents, Nathan and Clorine Wheeler, were of Scotch descent, 
the family having come to this country about 1760. 

Dr. Wheeler was educated at Easton Academy, where he was 
a student under the well known Rev. S. Irenaeus Prime, D. D. 

His medical studies were begun under the direction of his 
uncle. Dr. William Wheeler, who practiced at Merrick, Long- 
Island, and he graduated from the Berkshire Medical College 
in 1837. 

He commenced practice at Newton, Conn., where he remained 



266 HISTORY OF PCJTNA3I COU]>fTY. 

three years, and then removed to Southeast, Putnam county, 
where he practiced two years. 

Dr. Wheeler came to Patterson in December, 1842, and has 
ever since continued in that place in the practice of his pro- 
fession. 

For many years he resided on the farm belonging to his 
father-in-law, and afterward purchased it. Tt is now the prop- 
erty of Kent Henion, Esq. The present residence of Dr. 
Wheeler is in the village of Patterson. It was built in 1860. 

Dr. Wheeler married Mary, daughter of Dr. David Howland, 
a prominent physician of the last generation. Their children 
are Carrie, wife of Edward Doane, Esq., and Isabel, wife of 
James Cornwall, Esq., of Patterson. The former died in 1881. 

Dr. Wheeler is a member and supporter of the Episcopal 
church of Patterson, and has long been identified with it. He 
is a member of the Putnam County Medical Society, and one 
of its reorganizers. For four years he was its president, and 
the first delegate to the State Society. Dr. Wheeler's long and 
active practice has made him familiar to the people over a wide 
extent of countrj% while his skill and ability are attested by 
his undeniable and well recognized success. 

Dr. Jonathan F. Seelet. About a mile and a half north of 
Doansburg, and a half mile north of the line between South- 
east and Patterson, is an old homestead and farm, formerly the 
residence of Abijah Seeley, who was born in Trumbull, Conn., 
March 10th, 1777, and came to this county about the beginning 
of the present century. He set up his trade as a blacksmith, 
and also purchased a large farm at what is now known as 
"Deuel town," a hamlet near the south line of Patterson, the 
place being now owned by John Steinbeck. Mr. Seeley after- 
ward purchased the homestead mentioned above, and made it his 
home during the remainder of his life. He died August 4th, 
1861, at the age of 84. 

Mr. Seeley married Elizabeth, daughter of Jeremiah Hopkins, 
February 26th, 1801. She was born August 3d, 1783, and died 
March 9th, 1858. The children of this marriage were: Jeremiah 
H., Thomas P.. Mary, wife of David Tompkins of Cayuga 
county, N.Y.; Dr. Johathan F., Eliza, Belinda, Euphemia and 
Francis A. The only members of this family' now living are 
Mrs. Tompkins and Dr. Jonathan F. Seeley, the subject of this 
sketch. 




rD<r^t /> y~^ 




_,^^W:^ ^T^^^y^t^TT^' ^ 



^ 



GEITERAL HISTORY. 267 

Dr. Jonathan F. Seeley was born on the old homestead, May 
29th, 1S09. When a boy he attended the public school and was 
afterward a pupil of Dr. Russell J. Minor, who was well known 
as an instructor of the youth of the past generation. After 
leaving school, he became a teacher and served in that capacity 
for several years, in New Fairfield, Conn., Yorktown and East 
Fishkill. 

Dr. Seeley began his medical studies with Dr. James Foun- 
tain, of Yorktown, Westchester county, who was quite famous 
as a physician. In 1833, he entered the Medical College of 
Fairtield, Herkimer county, N. Y., and was licensed to practice 
in 1834. Dr. Seeley began to practice at Yorktown and re- 
mained till 1846, when he removed to Sheboygan, Wis., and re- 
linquishing his profession, engaged extensively in farming. His 
parents having deceased, Dr. Seeley returned in 1866 to his 
native town, and has continued to reside on the old homestead 
till the present time. On this place, the home of their child- 
hood, Dr. Seeley and his sister, Mrs. Tompkins, pass their 
time in quiet usefulness, good and worthy representatives of a 
family of the old New England race. 

Dr. Seeley married Martha, daughter of Abraham Van Gel- 
der, of New York; she died in 1877. Their daughter, Isabella, 
died in the 11th year of her age. 

Mr. David Tompkins, who married Mary, daughter of Abijah 
Seeley, was a native of Yorktown, Westchester county. He re- 
moved to Cayuga county, N. Y., about 1836, and died there in 
1878. They were the parents of three children, Amanda, Helen 
G., wife of Ezekiel Elting; and William S., all deceased. The 
only representative of this family is Mr. William Elting, son of 
Ezekiel Elting, and who is now living on the old homestead with 
Dr. Seeley and his grandmother. 

' Austin La Monte, M. D., well known as a skillful and ex- 
perienced member of the medical profession, was born in Char- 
lotteville, Schoharie county, N. Y., April 23d, 1837. 

His father, Thomas W. La Monte, married Elizabeth Maria 
Paine, and Dr. La Monte is the youngest of six brothers. The 
ancestor of the family was Robert La Monte, who came origin- 
ally from Scotland and the doctors great-grandfather, William 
La Monte (;born 1750, died 1847), was a soldier in the Revolu- 
tion. At tlie age of sixteen, the death of his father deprived 
him of parental care. 



26S HISTOKY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

After pursuing the usual brandies taught in the public schools, 
he entered the New York Conference Seminary and subse- 
quently studied medicine under the instruction of his uncle, 
Dr. William La Monte. He entered the Medical Department 
of the University of Michigan in 1859, and graduated in 1861. 
Dr. La Monte established his practice at Hyde Park, Dutchess 
county, where he remained nine years. 

After removing from that place, he passed a short period in 
travel, and came to Carmel, in January, 1871, where he com- 
menced a practice which he has continued till the present time. 
While at Hyde Park he became connected with the Dutchess 
County Medical Society, of which he is now an honorary mem- 
ber, and upon coming to Carmel was made member of the Put- 
nam County Medical Society and is still connected with that 
organization. He married Miss Sarah Berry, daughter of Peter 
N. Berry, of Dutchess county. Since making his home in 
Carmel he has gained a wide extended practice, and a well 
merited reputation as a skilled practitioner. 

Robert La Monte, the ancestor of the family, was born in 
1725, and died in 1789, at North Hillsdale, Columbia county, 
N. Y., and is buried there. 

Dr. George Wilson Murdoch was born at Pulaski, Oswego 
county, N. Y., September 25th, 184R. His paternal ancestors 
were of Scotch origin, and early settlers in Vermont, where 
they were well known in its history. His great-grandfather 
was a soldier in the Revolutionary army, and died while in 
service at Crown Point. Dr. Burdock graduated from the Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons, of New York city, in 1867. 
He was student of medicine with the late Doctor James L. 
Little, of New York city. He afterward associated in practice 
for some years with the late Dr. F. D. Lente, of Cold Spring, 
N. Y. He has been in active practice at Cold Spring for 
eighteen years, and surgeon to the West Point Foundry for 
twelve years. He was president of the Putnam County Medical 
Society from 1881 to 1884, and is a charter member of the New 
York Sate Medical Association. He was hospital steward of 
the 1st Minnesota Cavalry during the Indian Campaign in 1863, 
under General Sibley; also hospital steward and aftei-ward 
assistant surgeon of the 15th Michigan Infantry in the Army 
of the Tennessee. He was married October 12th, 1875, to Miss 
Mary Paulding, daughter of P. Kemble Paulding, Esq., of Cold 





-rt^. 



GENERAL HISTORY. 269 

Spring, N. Y., and grand-daughter of James K. Paulding. He 
is widely known as a successful and skillful physician. 

Dr. Jaued G. Wood was born in Katonah, Westchester 
county, N. Y., April 7th, 1835. He was educated at Union 
Academy, Bedford, and at the New York Normal School, 
graduating from the latter institution July 13th, 1854. He 
studied medicine at the Medical College of the University of 
the City of New York and took his degree in 1861. He first 
practiced at Croton Falls and in August, 1862, he received the 
unanimous appointment of the Examining Board, as surgeon of 
the 13oth Regt. N. Y. S. 

Upon retiring from the army he returned to Croton Falls and 
came to Brewster in April, 1883, and has since been engaged in 
practicing in that village. 

Dr. Wood, while engaged in teaching, was instrumental in 
founding the first teachers" association in his county, in 1854. 
He is an elder of the Presbyterian Church, Knight Templar, 
chaplain and ex-surgeon of Crosby Post, G. A. R., and as a 
physician enjoys a large practice. His grandfather. Dr. Wil- 
liam Wood, was a surgeon in the Revolution. Dr. Wood mar- 
ried Miss Marie Antoinette, daughter of Harrison Pardee, in 
1867. She died in 1885. leaving one son, Edward M. 

Lewis H. Miller, A.M., M.D., a well known and prominent 
member of the medical profession, was born in Bedford, West- 
chester county, N. Y., March 16th, 1852. His parents, Horace 
and Hannah Miller, were residents of that town, and repre- 
sentatives of one of the oldest families in the county. Dr. 
Miller remained at home attending the jiublic schools and the 
Bedford Academy, till 1870, when he entered the Freshman class 
at Madison University. He graduated in 1874 with the degree 
A.B., and received the degree A.M. from the same institution a 
few years later. 

For several years after leaving college he was engaged in 
teaching and as a civil engineer. Resolving to study for the medi- 
cal profession he commenced with Dr. Seth Shove, entered the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons of New York, and graduated 
in ISSO after nearly four years study. He commenced practice 
in the town of Patterson, where he remained nine months, and 
returning to New York, practiced in a New York iiospital for 
four months. 

In 1881 he came t(j Brewster and established a practice which 



70 HISTORY OF PtJTXAM COUXTY. 

he has since continued, and has made this village his permanent 
home. 

Dr. Miller is a member of the Putnam County Medical Society, 
and a delegate to the State Medical Society. His practice, which 
has steadily increased, now embraces a wide circuit of the sur- 
rounding country, and his success in his profession is the result 
of careful preparation and earnest effort. Dr. Miller is the sur- 
geon of the Tilly Foster Mining Company, and also for the New 
York & New England and New York & Northern Railroad 
Companies. His skill has been demonstrated in the successful 
performance of several very complicated and dangerous surgi- 
cal operations, as well as in his treatment and management of 
the most malignant form of the epidemic diseases. He is a 
member of the Masonic order and chapter, is connected with 
the Baptist Church of Brewster, and is one of the trustees of 
the society. He was married in November, ISSo, to Miss Flor- 
ence Mansfield, of Brooklyn, L. I. 

Dr. Edsox Card, .jr., the youngest of a family of five sons, 
was born in the town of Stanford, Dutchess county, N. Y., 
January 14th, 1856. His father, Edson Card, sen., a native of 
Columbia county, took a very active part in the Anti rent Asso- 
ciation that existed between 1839 and 1847, and that received 
satisfactory rights by the election of Gov. John Young in 1846, 
the anti-rent candidate. 

His mother was the daughter of Silas Miller, Esq., of Columbia 
county, and relative of the Hon. Theodore Miller of same 
county, now judge of the Court of Appeals. A brother next 
older occupies an honorable position in the practice of law in 
the city of Poughkeepsie. 

His eldest brother, attorney and counsellor at law, with the 
Hon. Homer A. Nelson, in New York city, has established a 
wide spread reputation as an orator of great ability and mag- 
netism, and is now Assemblyman from the Sharon District in 
the State of Connecticut. 

He attended the public schools of his native county for sev- 
eral years, and at the age of lo was placed under the special 
instruction of Hon. Edgar A. Briggs of Dutchess county, and 
continued there for three years, at the end of which time he re- 
ceived from Mr. Briggs (who was then the school commissioner 
of the 2d District of that county) a license to teach in the public 
schools of Dutchess county; which vocation he followed for 



GKNKRAL HISTORY. 271 

five years with credit to himself and all concerned, having under 
his care at different times the largest jxiblic schools in the 
county managed by a single instructor, but his taste ran to the 
science of medicine, and at the age of twenty he placed himself 
under the instruction of Dr. J. P. Wilson, of Pleasant Valley, 
Dutchess county, N. Y. 

Here, under Dr. Wilson, he continued for three years, at the 
same time continuing his vocation as teacher in the public 
schools. At the age of 23 he removed to New York city and 
entered the Medical Department of Columbia College; here he 
pursued the regular course of study marked out by the faculty 
of said college, coming up for examination in half his studies 
at the end of the second year, and the remaining half at the 
end of the third year. Thus at the age of 26 he graduated, and 
received his diploma on the 16th day of May, 1SS2, as a physi- 
cian and surgeon. Dui'ing his college course he was assistant 
to the following professors in their different branches of in- 
struction: Jno. C. Dalton and J. G. Curtis, professors on 
physiology; Alonzo Clark and Francis -Delaheld, professors on 
practice of medicine ; and Jas. W. McLane, professor on ob- 
stetrics; under all of whom he gained full confidence, and 
received letters of commendation. 

During his vacation in the summer of ISSO, he was employed 
in the di'ug store of Charles H. Bowne, in the city of Pough- 
keepsie, and during his vacation in the summer of ISSl, he en- 
tered the office of Dr. D. Guernsey, of Amenia, Dutchess 
county, N. Y., as a student and practicing physician under his 
direction. During the six months that he remained here he 
gained scores of friends and was chosen superintendent of the 
Presbyterian Sabbath school, and the community in general 
expected that on graduating he would return there to settle; 
but he decided that the field was already well covered there 
and began immediately to look about for some other place to 
follow his chosen profession. Finally deciding upon Lake 
Mahopac he removed thither July 13th, 1SS2, and now enjoys a 
satisfactory practice both from the people in the surrounding 
vicinity and also from the city people who annually visit this 
most delightful summer resort. 

His residence is now at the Thompson House. He has been 
a member of the Presbyterian denomination since 1S74, and 



272 HISTORY OF PUT^-AM COUNTY. 

has held the office of superintendent of Sabbath school at 
different times and places. 

Dr. James Haddex was born in Putnam Valley, September 
19th, 1837. His father, Samuel Hadden, and graadfather, Wil- 
liam Hadden, were residents of the county He received his 
primary education at the public schools of Putnam county and 
at Union Academy, Bedford, Westchester county. In 1861, he 
graduated from the New York Medical College, receiving the 
degree of M. D. He studied medicine with Dr. A. G. Travis, 
of Kent, and Dr. John McKenney, of Hlinois. He began the 
practice of medicine in New York city, and continued until 
1862, when he joined the 95th Regiment, as surgeon, and con- 
tinued in the service till the close of the war, when he returned 
to New York city. In ISSO, he removed to Putnam Valley, 
Putnam county, where he has continued to practice until the 
present time. He is a member of the Medical Society of the 
City of New York. 

Ernest Hebersmth, M. D., son of Rev. Orsamus H. Smith, 
for many years rector of Christ Church, Patterson, was born in 
Rensselaerville, Albany county, N. Y., on the 20th of January, 
1840. 

He was educated chiefly by his father, until his twelfth year, 
when he was sent to the Balston Spa Institute. He prepared 
for college at the Cheshire Academy, Cheshire, Conn., and en- 
tered Hobart College, Geneva, N. Y., in 1857. 

He began the study of medicine under Dr. N. W. Wheeler, 
of Patterson, and graduated from the College of Physicians 
and Surgeons, of New York, in the spring of 1861. He was at 
that time a resident interne of Bellevue Hospital and re- 
mained until the breaking out of the War of the Rebellion, 
when he entered the U. S. Navy as assistant surgeon, and 
served in that capacity until the close of the war. His principal 
service was under Admiral Farragut. He was present at the 
capture of New Orleans and Mobile, and took part in nearly all 
the battles fought under that great captain, and in the blockade 
of the Gulf ports. He was once severely wounded in the face 
and hand, for which he was granted a pension in 1883. 

After re-signing from the navy in 1865, he settled in New 
Orleans, engaged in private practice, and was immediately ap- 
pointed acting assistant surgeon in the U. S. Army. He was 
assigned to duty at the military hospitals in that city, and as 



GEXEUAL HIS^TORY. -^/o 

attendins sur^-eon upon officers and officers' families in tlie city. 
At one time during the yellow fever epidemic of 1SG7, he was 
for a week the only one of five medical officers attached to a 
laro-e military hospital able to keep his feet, the other four, one 
of whom was his brother, Orsamns, being down with the fever. 
The following year an epidemic of cholera taxed the medical 
officers almost as severely, and the hospitals were discontinued. 

His services being no longer required, he resigned from the 
army and was soon after put in charge of the U. S. Marine Hos- 
pital Service, at New Orleans. He was transferred to the charge 
of the same service at NeAv York in 1871, and in 1S79 was 
transferred to the charge of the same service in San Francisco, 
where he finally resigned all government service in ISSl. 

Returning to Patterson in 1SS2, he engaged in the private 
practice of his profession and is now associated with Dr. J. Sut- 
cliffe Hill. 

THE MEDICAL SOCIETIES OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

Very little can be learned of the old Medical Society of Put- 
nam county. The earliest positive date is 1S2S, when Dr. Aaron 
Carman of \he town of Carmel became a member. Dr. Edward 
Crosby, who practiced in Carmel later, says that his uncle, Noah 
H. Crane, used to say that Dr. Fletcher (probably Ebenezer 
Fletcher) of Patterson, was the last president, and he died in 
1852. Soon after the organization of the present society, Dr. 
Edward Crosby was appointed to look up the records and seal 
of the old society. He reported that he had made strict search 
but nothing could be found. 

The present County Medical Society was formed in 1874. July 
7th. an informal meeting was held in the parlor of the Gleneida 
Hotel, Carmel, N. Y. ^Present: J. H. Smith, N. W. Wheeler, 
A. Ely, E. Crosby, J. Q. Adams. A. La Monte, M. A. Bailey 
and Fred. W. Bennett. J. H. Smith was elected chairman and 
M. A. Bailey, secretary. The chairman stated the object of the 
meeting and discussion followed. A resolution was passed to 
meet a" the Gleneida Hotel July 2Sth, 1874, at 12 M., for the 
purpose of forming a County Medical Society,, and it was signed 
by the eight physicians present. 

July 28th, 1874, an adjourned meeting of the physicians of 
Putnam county was held in the parlor of the Gleneida Hotel. 
Present: Dr. Aaron Carman, of Lake Mahopac. Dr. Edward 



274 HISTORY OF PUTXA3I COUXTT. 

Crosby, of Mahopac Falls, Dr. Joseph H. Bailey, of Kent Cliffs. 
Dr. M. A. Bailey, of Kent Cliffs, Dr. N. W. Wheeler, of Pat- 
terson, Dr. A. La Monte, of Carmel, Dr. J. Q. Adams, of Car- 
mel. Dr. A. Ely, of Carmel, and Dr. E. A. Hobbs, of Patterson. 
The following officers were elected: Joseph Howard Bailey, of 
Kent Cliffs, president; Edward Crosby, of Mahopac Falls, vice 
president; Matthew Arbuckle Bailey, of Kent Cliffs, secretary; 
John Homer Smith, of Brewster, treasurer; Austin La Monte, 
of Carmel, Ezra Allen Hobbs, of Patterson, John Quincy Adams, 
of Carmel, censors; Nathan William Wheeler, of Patterson, 
delegate to State Medical Society. 

A motion to appoint a committee of three to draft a constitu- 
tion and by laws was then made and carried. The president ap 
pointed as such committee, Drs. J. Q. Adams, J. H. Smith and 
M. A. Bailey. On motion adjourned to meet on the 11th of 
August, at 2 o'clock, P. M., same place. 

At an adjourned meeting, held on the 11th of August, nine 
members were present. A constitution and by laws were offered, 
read and adopted by articles. 

At the eighteenth regular meeting of the society, held Octo- 
ber 28th, 1879, the subject of incorporation came before the so- 
ciety, it having been discovered that it was not legally incor- 
porated. A committee consisting of M. A. Bailey and N. B. 
Bayley was appointed to ascertain, and report at the next meet- 
ing what steps were necessary to legally incorporate the society. 

At the nineteenth regular meeting, held January 27th, 1880, 
the committee on incorporation reported that it would be nec- 
essary for the incorporation of the society to meet, and hold 
our next annual meeting in the room in the Court House in 
Carmel in which the County Court had held its last session. A 
motion was made that the next annual meeting be held in the 
Court room of the county of Putnam. Motion carried. 

The sixth annual meeting was accordingly held in the Court 
House, and on account of the importance of the business trans- 
acted at that meeting the following copy from the minutes is 
given: 

"Pursuant to. due notice given, the following physicians and 
surgeons, residing in Putnam count}-, State of New York, 
authorized by law to practice medicine and surgery, met to- 
gether at 11 o'clock, A. M., on Tuesday, July 27th, ISSO, in the 
room in the County Court House in the village of Carmel, being 



GENERAL HISTORY. 275 

the place where the last term of the Court of Common Pleas 
next previous to such meetino; was held in Putnam county. 

"Present: Drs. Nathan Wra. Wheeler, of Patterson, John 
Homer Smith, of Brewster, Norman Brigham Bayley, of 
Brewster, Matthew Arbuckle Bailey, of Carmel, Austin La 
Monte, of Carmel, John Quincy Adams, of Carmel, Edward 
Crosby, of Carmel, George Wilson Murdock, of Philipstown. 

" Dr. K. W. Wheeler was elected temporary chairman. Dr. 
N. B. Bayley was elected temporary secretary. Dr. M. A. 
Bailey moved that we proceed to organize a County Medical 
Society by the election of officers to serve one year. 

" The following officers were elected: President, Dr. N.'W. 
Wheeler; vice-president, Dr. Geo. W. Murdock; secretary, Dr. 
N. B. Bailey; treasurer. Dr. A. La Monte; censors, J. H. 
Smith, Edward Crosby, J. Q. Adams. 

" The above minutes are placed on file in the county clerk's 
ofiice in the county of Putnam, State of New York, as required 
by law in order to complete legal organization of the Putnam 
County Medical Society. 

"Dr. M. A. Bailey offered the following resolution: 

"Resolved that all the acts and proceedings of the organiza- 
tion known as the Putnam County Medical Society since the 
date of the organization, July 2Sth, 1874, be accepted and de- 
clared binding upon this society which has now been organized 
under the laws of the State of New York. 

" This resolution was seconded by Dr. Edward Crosby and 
unanimously adopted.'" 

Charter Members: 

John Quincy Adams, M. D.; joined July, 2Sth, 1874; born 
Rushford, Alleghany County, N. Y., December 31st, 1827; 
graduated University Medical College, New York city, 
March 5th, 1853; residence, Carmel; censor, 1874, 1875, 1880; 
vice-president, 1876, 1877, 1878, 1881, 1882, 1883; president, 
1884, 1885; delegate to State Medical Society, 1880 to 1884; 
became a member State Medical Society in 1884; late brevet 
major and surgeon U. S. Vol. Corps. 

Joseph Howard Bailey, M. D., U. S. A.; joined July 28th, 
1874; born in Fredericktown, Dutchess county, N. Y., October 
20th, 1803; graduated from Rutger Medical College, New York 
city in 1827; appointed assistant surgeon U. S. Army in 1834; 
retired from active service in 18G2; residence, Kent Clitfs, Put- 



276 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

nam councy, N. Y.; president Putnam County Medical Society 
in 1874 and 1875. 

Matthew Arbnckle Bailey, M. D.; joined July 28th, 1S74; 
born at Fort Smith, Arkansas, December 21st, 1844; graduated 
from Bellevue Hospital Medical College, New York city in 
1871; secretary from 1874 to 1878 inclusive. 

Aaron Carman, M. D.; joined July 2Sth, 1874; born in Phil- 
ipstown, Putnam county, February 2oth, 1798; graduated from 
the College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York city. May 
25th, 1822; residence Lake Mahopac. 

Edward Crosby, M. D. ; joined July 28th, 1874; born in South- 
east", Putnam county, N. Y., June 22d, 1812; graduated at the 
Jeiferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pa., 1840; residence, 
Mahopac Falls; vice-president, 1874; censor from 1877 to 1879 
inclusive. 

Nathan William Wheeler, M. D. ; joined July 28th, 1874; born 
Weston, Fairfield county, Conn., December 22d, 1815; graduated 
from Berkshire Medical College, Pittsfield, Mass., June 12th, 
1838: residence, Patterson, Putnam county, N. Y.; delegate to 
State Medical Society from 1874 to 1876 inclusive, and resigned 
as such April 24th, 1877; president from 1876 to 1880 in- 
clusive. 

Austin La Monte, M. D.; joined July 2Sth, 1874; born in 
Charlotteville, Schoharie county, N. Y., April 23d, 1837; gradu- 
ated from the University of Michigan Medical College in 1861; 
residence, Carmel, Putnam county, N. Y.; censor 1874 to 1877 
inclusive and in 1885; treasurer from 1877 to 1885 inchisive; 
delegate to the State Medical Society from 1877 to 1880. . 

Addison Ely, joined July 2Sth, 1874; born at Westfield, Mass., 
in 1813; licensed by the Massachusetts State Medical Society 
in 1834; residence Carmel, Putnam county, N. Y. 

Ezra Allen Hobbs, M. D.; joined July 28th, 1874; graduated 
from Bowdoin Medical College, Maine, in 1869; censor 1874, 
1875 and 1876; withdrew from the society October 30th, 1877, 
and went to South Framingham, Mass. 

Frederic William Bennett, M. D.; joined July 2Sth, 1874; 
graduated from College of Physicians and Surgeons New York 
city, in 1873; residence, Brewster, Putnam county, N. Y.; witli- 
drew January 2od, 1877, and went to Newark, N. J. 

John Homer Smith; born at Washington, Litchfield county, 
Conn.; joined July 28th, 1874; licensed by the Dutchess County 



GENERAL HISTORY. 277 

Medical Society; treasurer in 1874, 1875, and 1876; censor, 1879 
to 1884, inclusive; residence, Brewster, Putnam county, N. Y. 

Meetings: — Annual, fourth Tuesday in July; semi-annual, 
fourth Tuesday in January. 

Officers July 21st, 1885:— J. Q. Adams, president; S. A. 
Wood, vice president; L. H. Miller, secretary; A. La Monte, 
treasurer; censors, A. Ely, A. La Monte, N. W. Wheeler; dele- 
gate to State Medical Society, L. H. Miller. 

Members: — John Q. Adams, Carmel, N. Y. ; Norman B. 
Bayley, Haverstraw, Rockland county, N. Y. ; J. Edson Card, 
jr., Lake Mahopac, N. Y. ; Edward Crosby, Mount Kisco, 
Westchester county, N. Y.; Addison Ely, Carmel; Walter A. 
Jayne, Cold Spring; Austin La Monte, Carmel; Louis H. Miller, 
Brewster; Geo. W. Murdock, Cold Spring; Nathan W. Wheeler, 
Patterson; Samuel A. Wood, Ludingtonville; William Young, 
Cold Spring; number of members, 12. 

Honorary members: — Henry Pearce, Pawling, Dutchess 
county, N. Y. ; Ernest Hebers, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



CHAPTER XVIII. 

EDUCATION. 

BY JAMES A. FOSHAY. 

THE present condition of education in Putnam county 
shows a spirit of improvement, especially in the larger 
districts and villages. There are several schools that deserve 
special notice, for the improvements that have been made in the 
modern ti'aining of youth is illustrated in them, and excellent 
results are shown. A few of the country districts, however, do 
not show so much advancement. The "a b c method" of 
teaching children to read is generally abandoned and the " word 
method" is used instead. Pupils are taught to understand 
what they read, instead of merely pronouncing the words. 
Teachers feel the responsibilities of dealing with plastic minds, 
so susceptible to impressions, knowing that their influences 
make impressions that last through life. There is no depart- 
ment whose influences tend to suppress vice and stimulate vir- 
tue, as the department of public instruction. We find the 
school houses and churches side by side, and the people quite 
as willing to support the one as the other. In the year ISSo, 
there was raised by local taxation, for the benefit of schools, 
$22,602.47, and 89,158.21 was received from the State school 
money; making $31,760.(38. There is a steadily growing interest 
manifested in reference to our system of public education. As 
the people are educated to a due appreciation of the import- 
ance of good schools, so the schools improve. The teachers gen- 
erally are zealous and industrious, depending more on them- 
selves and less upon the text-book than formerly. Of the 
seventy-three teachers now employed, four are licensed by State 
certificates, eight by jS'ormal School diplomas and sixty-three 
by the school commissioner. 



GENERAL HISTORY. 279 

The improvement in school houses is an evidence of progress. 
A pleasant room of proper size, well-furnished and kept neat, is 
a strong educating force, and sheds forth an influence for good 
on the pupils. The people realize this; and for several years 
we have seen new, commodious houses being built to take the 
places of the old ones; and in building them the health and 
comfort of the pupils were consulted. There are thirty-eight 
school houses that are new or in good repair; sixteen are com- 
fortable; and six are poor. In a few of the old buildings there 
still remain benches for seats, one desk extending the side of 
the room, so that the pupils must face the walls. It is pleasing 
to note that the number of buildings of this class is growing 
less every year. There are fifty-five frame buildings and five 
brick buildings. 

The local school officers, as a rule, are faithful and earnest in 
the performance of their duties and gratuitous work; and mani- 
fest muck interest in the welfare of the schools. Forty-one dis- 
tricts have one trustee each, eighteen districts have three ^ trus- 
tees each, and one, the Union Free School District at Garrisons, 
has five trustees. 

Full success in school work cannot be attained while we have 
irregular attendance. It disorganizes classes and makes extra 
work for the teachers in many ways. There were 3,057 names 
enrolled during the year 1S85. There were nine private schools, 
with an enrollment of 114 pupils, taught during the year 1885. 
The best means of special preparation for the greatest num- 
ber of our teachers is the Teachers' Institute. It brings to the 
attention of teachers, by persons of rare ability, the latest and 
best experience in education and school government. The time 
and place for holding the institute are designated, and the in- 
structors are assigned by the State superintendent of public in- 
struction. The sessions are usually in May and continue one 
week. 

The Putnam County Teachers' Association was organized 
May 24th, 1882, with Mr. Frank H. Greene as president; which 
office he has continued to hold. Papers and addresses have 
been presented by the best teachers of the county, and discussed 
by meml)ers of the association. The meetings of this associa- 
tion are held semi-annually in different parts of the county, 
thus affording opportunities for all to attend. These meetings 
are verv uset\il to the younger teachers who receive methods 



280 HISTORr OF PUT>'AM COUNTY. 

and suggestions from tliose who have had experience in the 
work. 

There seems to be a general disposition to comply with Chap- 
ter 30 of the Laws of 1884; "An act in relation to the study 
of physiology and hygiene in public schools." Soon after the 
passage of this act School Commissioner Foshay issued a cir- 
cular to teachers, also one to trustees, calling attention to the 
act. Reports show that the study was taught in nearly every 
school. 

In the apportionment of the State school money for 1886, the 
"district quota," or amount to be given for each teacher in 
the county is §66.12, an increase of §21.28 over the year 1885. 
This increase is the result of the provision in Chapter 340 of 
the Laws of 1885, changing the basis of apportionment. This 
is a very desirable change, as it aids the country districts 
especially. 



CHAPTER XIX. 

TOWN OF CARMEL. 

REVISED BY REV. W. S. CLAPP. 

Settlement and Early History.-Village of Carme!.-Lake Gleneida.-Carmel 
Collegiate Institute and Drew Ladies' Seminary.— Carmel Literary Union.— 
Railroad.— Bank.— Newspapers.— The Gilead Church.— Rev. Daniel D. Sahler. 
— Gilead Burying Ground.— James Raymond.— Mount Carmel Baptist Church. 
—Rev. WiUiam S. Clapp.— Methodist Episcopal Church. 

THE town of Carmel includes the southern half of Lots 5 
and 6 of the Philipse Patent. It is bounded north by 
Kent, east by Southeast, south by Westchester county, and 
west 'by Putnam Valley. A small portion of the northwest 
corner of the town was annexed to Putnam Valley in 1861.^ 

The earliest account of a settlement in this town is derived 
from the Hamblin family. In the year 1739 Eleazar Hamb- 
lin, with his family, left Cape Cod to seek a home in New York. 
On' his way he stopped at the house of John Hazen in Nor- 
wich. He concluded to leave his family there and to go for- 
ward himself to find a suitable place for settling. On his 
return he found that his daughter, Sarah, had married Caleb 
Hazen, the son of his host. His son-in-law went with him and 
both settled in what is now the town of Carmel. Eleazar 
Hamblin made his home on the present homestead farm of Ira 
Crane, and here he lived and died. The house stood about 
fifteen rods south of Mr. Crane's residence. Caleb Hazen settled 
at what has ever since been called Hazen Hill, about a mile 
southwest of the village of Carmel. The old homestead stood 
near the bank of the west branch of Croton River, where the 
house of Mrs. William H. Baxter now stands. Near this place 
he had in later years a forge and a small furnace for melting 
iron. Traces of this furnace may still be seen. 



282 HISTORY OF put:s-a3[ county. 

In the statement' of Nimliam, the Indian sachem, it is seen 
that many persons settled at an early date on the eastern part 
of Philipse Patent as tenants of the Indians who claimed the 
land, or by their permission. The affidavit of Timothy Shaw- 
furnishes a very reliable list of some of the early settlers. Among 
these was George Hughson, who settled at the north end of 
Lake Mahopac about 1740 and probably on the farm which was 
held by his son, Robert Hughson, at the time of the Revolu- 
tion, and was bought by him from the commissioners of for- 
feiture in 1782. 

About 1741 William and Uriah Hill came to the place after- 
ward known as Red Mills and began to clear a tract of land 
purchased of the Indians. Uriah is said to have made himself 
obnoxious to his dusky neighbors and was obliged to leave. 
William continued here and in 1765 purchased of Roger Morris 
and Mary his wife the tract on which he had made a settlement, 
and part of which is owned by his descendants at the present 
time. 

Timothy Shaw' made his home at the north end of the lake 
which from him took the name of Shaw's Pond, which it con- 
tinued to bear till modern times, when it was changed to the 
more romantic and musical title of Lake Gleneida. As in his 
affidavit made in 1767 he states that he was well acquainted 
with all the settlements that had been made in these parts 
within twenty-five years, it is evident that he must have been 
here as early as 1742, and he doubtless has the honor of being 
the first settler in the present village of Carmel. 

The Myrrick family were also here at an early date, though 
the first of whom anything definite is known were Isaac* and 

'See Chapter on Wappinger Indians. 

'See Chapter on Population. 

'In an old burying ground on the Belden farm, a"t thesouthwest corner of Lake 
Gleneida, and where the slaves of the Belden family were buried, is a small 
enclosure surrounding a single grave and a head stone recording the death of 
Deborah Shaw, who died May 5th, 1S34, aged 84. She was a white woman who 
lived with several families. She requested to be buried in that place because, as 
she said, ■' my ancestors lie there." It is probable that she was a daughter of 
Timothy Shaw and that a family burying place was there in early times. 

^ Isaac was born about 1740, and died in May, 1812. He married Sarah, 

daughter of Caleb Hazen. Their children were: Jemima, wife of Green; 

David, born Decemljer 18th, 1768, died 1863; John, born 1770, died 1812; Aris- 
tobulus, born 1774, died IS-iO; Samuel, born 1778, died 1812; Ada, wife of Thomas 
Smith; Marv: Naomi, wife of Foster Finch; Ezra, and Sarah. 



TOWN OF CAKMEL. 



283 



David Myrrick, who were doubtless of a second generation. A 
family named Tompkins were among the earliest residents^in 
the western part of the town, north of Lake Mahopac. Wil- 
liam Wright, a Scotchman, lived south of Carmel village, on 
the present farm of George M. Hughson. 

It will be remembered that at the tiraa of the settlement and 
for many years after, the Philipse Patent was not surveyed, 
and these early inhabitants were simply squatters on unoccupied 
land and made such arrangements with their Indian neighbors 
as thev could. In the year 1754 the patent was surveyed and 
divided into lots, and Lot 6 (which includes the eastern part of 
this town) fell to Philip Philipse, and Lot 5 (which includes 
the western part) fell to Mary Philipse, afterward wife of 
Roger Morris. These two portions will be considered sepa- 

rately. 

In the year 1762, Lot No. 6, which belonged to Philip 
Philipse, was surveyed and divided into farms of various sizes 
and leased to a large number of tenants, most of whom were in 
actual^ possession at that time. The descendants of many of 
these tenants are to be found here at the present day, while 
some families, once numerous, have moved away to other re- 
o-ions, or become extinct. 

Amono- the names of the earliest settlers should be mentioned 
John Sprago-, who was here in 1745, and whose house stood on 
the east line" of the lot, where the residence of LeGrand Hugh- 
son now stands, on the road from Carmel to Brewster. A man 
named Wooden had a mill on the west branch of the Croton, 
while another, kept by one Kellogg, was probably on what was 
then called " Mill River," and now "Michael's Brook." And 
Silas Washburn also had a mill on the west branch of the 

Croton. ^ . ., ^^^, 

In the Field Book of Survey of Lot No. 6, made April 12th, 
176'^ by Benjamin Morgan, the following persons are men- 
tioned as living on that part of the lot which is now embraced 
in the town of Carmel: Daniel Taylor, Samuel Peters, Abraham 
Mabie, Daniel Taylor, Isaac Lounsbury, Joseph Bates, Thomas 
Baxter, Thomris Karl, Solomon Jenkins, Daniel Philips, 
Michael Sloat, Francis Brian, Thos. Ferguson, John Craft, 
James Sears, Eleazar Hamlin, Caleb Hazen, James Russell, 
Jesse Smith, Jonathan Hubby, Elisha Oakley, John Ganoung, 
Edward Ganoung, Joseph Ganoung, Russel Gregory, 



284 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

Joseph Bates, Timothy Gregory, Ebenezer Robinson, 

Wooden, Kellogg, James Wilson, Hannah 

Finch, Nathaniel Robinson, John Maybee, William Stone, 
Helkiah Brown, Philip Rnflf, John Rnff, Isaac Peree, Uriah 
Lawrence, Abraham Hartwell, Caleb Brundage, Rev. Elnathan 

Gregory, Jeremiah Huston, Burbank, John Tompkins. 

Widow Kerkins, Thomas Crosby, John Merrick, Samuel Lucas, 
Matthew Bump, Wheaten Robinson, Bethiah Ballard, Silas 
Washburn, David Merrick, Seth Merrick, Moses Fowler, 
Daniel Townsend, William Merritt, John Sprages, Josiah Peck, 
Benjamin Barber, Samuel Gates, Isaac Merritt, Mercy Hopkins, 
John Barber, Thomas Philips, Esq., Jonathan Hopkins, Robert 
Fuller, Joseph Barber, John Paddock, Hezekiah Mead, David 
Barber, Samuel Peree, William Dean, Hezekiah Mead, Abigail 
Terry, Amos Fuller, Edsy Baker, Cornelias Fuller, John 
Travis, Eleazar Baker, John Purdy, Edmund Baker, Wm. 
Rapelyea, Benjamin Weed, Elisha Baker, Isaac Smith. 

As stated before, these farms were leased to tenants. One of 
the original leases is yet in existence, and as a relic of antiquity 
it is here given in full : 

"This Indenture made the Eighth day of August in the year 
of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and sixty-six. Be- 
tween Philip Philipse of the City of New York of the one part 
and James Dickinson of the County of Dutchess in the province 
of New York of the other part. Witnesseth: That the said 
Philip Philipse for and in consideration of the sum of twenty 
pounds current money of New Y^ork, to him in hand paid by 
James Dickinson, the receipt whereof the said Philip Philipse 
doth hereby confess and acknowledge, and also in considera- 
tion of the rent and Covenant hereinafter Reserved and Con- 
tained, he the said Philip Philipse hath granted, Bargained, 
sold, delivered, enfeoffed. Released, Conveyed and Confirmed, 
and by these presents doth grant, bargain, sell, alien, enfeoff. 
Release, Convey and Confirm unto the said James Dickinson 
and his heirs and assigns forever. All that Messuage and tract 
of land. Situate, Lying and being on Philipse Patent in 
Dutchess County and Province of New York, that was formerly 
in possession of Thomas Crosby. Beginning at Shaw's Pond so 
called. Running Easterly in company with Silas Washburn's 
farm to Saw Mill River, from thence running Southwardly 
down said river in company with Matthew Bump's farm, so 



TOWN OF CARMEL. 285 

called, to Jeremiah Hughson's farm' from thence running 
westwardly in company with Jeremiah Hughson's farm to the 
Rev. Mr. Elnathan Gregory's farm,' from thence westwardly 
to John Merrick's farm, so called, from thence Northwardly in 
company with John Merrick's farm to the first mentioned 
bounds." Containing two hundred and ninety-two acres. In- 
cluding the dwelling houses, barn and saw mill, orchards, fences 
and ap'iiurtenances thereto belonging. Excepting and always 
reserving nnto the said Philipse, his heirs and assigns, all 
mines, minerals and oares of metals that is on, or shall be 
found or discovered in or upon the said premises, or any part 
thereof. 

" To Have and to Hold the said Messuage and premises here- 
by granted and conveyed, and every part thereof, with .the ap- 
purtenances thereof, except as excepted, unto the said James 
Dickinson, his heirs and assigns to the only proper use and be- 
hoof of the said James Dickinson, his heirs and assigns for 
ever. Yielding and paying therefor yearly and every year unto 
the said Philip Philipse, his heirs and assigns the rent or sura 
of fourteen pounds, current money of New York at or upon 
the eighth day of August yearly and every year for ever, at the 
dwelling house of the said Philip Philipse, his heirs or assigns 
in the City of New York, if he or they shall reside in New York 
or at such other place in the City' of New York as the said 
Philip Philipse, his heirs or assigns shall by writing direct and 
appoint, or if the said Philip Philipse, his heirs or assigns shall 
not reside in the city of New York, or shall not by writing di- 
rect and appoint any place in the City of New York for pay- 
ment thereof, then and in such case the said reserved rent shall 
be payable on the said granted premises. And if it shall hap- 
pen the said yearly rent and payment or any part thereof to 
be behind and unpaid in part or in all, by the space of twenty 
days next after the said time limited for payment thereof, on 
which the same ought to be paid, that then and from thence- 
forth it shall and may be Lawfull to and for the said Philip 
Philipse, his heirs and assigns, with the said premises with the 
appurtenances, or with any part thereof in the Name of the 
whole to re-enter and the same to have again, Reposess and en- 

I Now- the farm of Addison Hopkins. 

-■ Now the homestead of* Lymau Craft (opposite Gilead bmying ground) and 
land adjoining. 



286 HISTORY OF PUT:S'AiI COU>'TY. 

joy as his or their former estate, this present indentuTe or any 
thing therein contained to the contrary notwithstanding. And 
the said Philip Philpse, for himself and assigns, Doth coven- 
ant and grant to and with the said James Dickinson, his heirs, 
and assigns that for and notwithstanding any matter or thing by 
him the said Philip Philipse, done or committed to the contrary, 
he the said Philip Philipse, hath good right fall power and law- 
full authority in his own right to grant, bargain, sell and con- 
vey the said premises above mentioned with the appurtenances 
unto the said James Dickinson, his heirs and assigns to the only 
proper use and behoof of the said James Dickinson, his heirs 
and assigns forever, according to the true Intent and meaning 
of these presents, and also that the said James Dickinson, his 
heirs and assigns shall and may from time to time and at all 
times henceforth forever hereafter by and under the said rent 
of fourteen pounds herein contained, peaceably and quietly en- 
ter into and have, occupy and enjoy, all and singular the said 
Messuage and premises above mentioned with all the ajipurten- 
ances, and receive the profits thereof to his and their own use, 
without the denial of him the said Philip Philipse, his heirs or 
assigns, or any other persons whatsoever and that freed from all 
other bargains and Incumbrances whatsoever. And the said 
James Dickinson for himself, his heirs, executors, and admin- 
istrators Doth covenant with the said Philip Philipse, his heirs 
and assigns that he the said James Dickinson his heirs, execu- 
tors, administrators and assigns shall and will well and truly 
pay or caiTse to be paid to the said Philip Philipse, his heirs or 
assigns the said yearly rent of fourteen pounds herein contained 
and reserved according to the true intent and meaning of these 
presents without any deduction, abatement or imposition of 
taxes either ordinary or extraordinary whatsoever. 

"/« Witness Whereof the parties to these presents Inden- 
tures, have interchangably set their hands and seals the day 
and year tirst above written. 

"Philip Philipse. (L. S.) 

" Sealed and delivered 
" in the presence 

"John Dickinsox, 

" Daniel Wright." 

Such was the general form of a lease at that time. Of course 
the term of years varied in different cases from one vear to 



TOWN OF CAKMEL. ^S' 



perpetuitvas in the above case. The farm '^^' '']'^ ^'^l^'' 
fhe land ^here the railroad station at Carmel stands, the farm 
and homestead of Henry D. Clapp, the grounds o the Drew 
Ladies- Seminary, the Gilead Burying Ground, the presen 
Presbyterian church and lands adjoining. The nor h line o 
the fa™ starts from the lake at the south line of the school 
house lot, and runs east along the north line of the Presby- 
terian church lot, the lands of Daniel W. Robinson and Char- 
lotte Hopkins, to the Michael's Brook or Saw Mill River as 
it was formerly called. It ran south along this brook to the 
present farm of Addison J. Hopkins, then west to the old road 
that used to- run east from the Gilead Burying Ground; t^en 
along the old "Horse pound road" west to the corner. The 
farm of John Merrick lay on the west of the road (which ran 
some distance west of its present route) and is now owned by 
George W. Hughson. Upon the back of the original lease was 
endorsed the following : . 

-I James Dickinson, do, for value received assign o^el all 
my r'io-ht, title, claim and interest in the within lease unto John 
Wallace, jr., and Thomas Huggeford as witness my hand and 

seal this' 23 day of April 1774. 

" James Dickixsox. 

John Wallace transferred his interest to Mr. Nathan Pad- 
dock "bes^inning at a pile of stones by the highway south o 
the house^of James Dickinson and running east 16 chains and 
30 links to a pile of stones; then north 12 degrees, west 20 
chains and 60 links; then N. 77* degrees E. to the saw ml 
river- then up the stream till it comes to Samuel \\ ashbmn s 
farm'; then westerly by Washburn's farm till it comes to John 
Merrick's farm; then southerly along John Merrick sf aim to 
the first. bounds, containing 170 acres more or less. ^ January 

This is evidently the north part of the farm. Thomas Hug- 
seford "of Fairfield County, Connecticut,' _U;ansferred all his 
ricrht to James Dickinson, jr., April 13th, l/7o 

A deed from Frederick Philipse to Elisha Cole dated Decem- 
ber '^d IS'^S recites the foregoing lease, and goes on to state 
that'tl'ie farm had been divided and sold by subsequent owners, 
and that the rent had been charged to each part. The north 

. Ori^nn.l ,l,K-u.ueut in possession of O. W. Cole, Carmel. See Book -A" of 
Deeds pau<' K''''. Putnam County Records. 



288 HISTORY OF PUTXAJE COUNTY. 

part of the farm had come into the possession of Frederick 
Philipse (who was the heir of Philip Philipse) and the south 
part had come into the possession of Elisha Cole whereby he 
was liable for the annual rent of seven pounds, and by this deed 
Frederick Philipse, in consideration of the sum of S291.60 cents, 
released all his claim on the south half of the farm to Elisha 
Cole, with the following reservations : 

" It is understood that the right to collect any part of the said 
rent from the trustees of the Gilead meeting house or society, 
or to distrain for the same upon the premises occupied for the 
said meeting house and burying ground attached thereto is 




THE PHILIPSE MANOR HOUSE. 

From a drawing by Chas. H. Ludington, July 6th, 1846. 

hereby reserved by the said Frederick Philipse to himself and 
his heirs." Upon the north half of this farm stood for many 
years a house said to have been built by Frederick Philipse 
after the Kevolation, and in this mansion he resided when he 
came to visit his estate. This house stood on the east side of 
the present road about an eighth of a mile below the seminary. 
A row of lilac Ijushes mark the s^^ot and have long survived the 
hand that planted them, and they are all that is left to remind 
the traveller that there stood the house of the "Lord of the 
ManiH'."' After the death of Frederick Philipse his daughter, 



TOWN OF CARMEL. 2S9 

]\[ary, with her husband, Samuel Gouverneur, sold to Elisha 
Cole all the remaining north i^art of the farm, the deed being 
dated February 1st, 1S30'. 

Elisha Cole remained in possession of the greater part of 
these tracts until the time of his death which occurred July 19th, 
ISol, at the age of 75. After soine changes, the larger part came 
into possession of Daniel Drew and is now owned by his de- 
scendants. After the death of Philip Philij^se, which occurred 
in 176S, Lot 6 fell by the terms of his will to his wife, Margaret 
(who afterward married Rev. John Ogilvie) and his surviving 
children; jN'athaniel, Frederick and Adolph. In 1771 a parti- 
tion of this lot was made among these heir?, and the field book 
of survey is in the county clerk's office at Poughkeepsie, while 
the map is in the office of the secretary of State. The partition 
was made in accordance with the terms of an act of the Pro- 
vincial Legislature, passed January 9th, 1762, "For the more 
effectually collecting his Majesty's Quit Rents." As some of 
the heirs were minors it was necessary to proceed in a strictly 
legal manner. The field book states all the proceedings. An 
advertisement signed by Adolph Philipse was printed in " Hugh 
Gaine's New York Gazette and in John Holt's New York Jour- 
nal," or the "General Advertizer," for the term of twelve 
weeks. Two of the commissioners appointed, Thomas Belden 
and Moss Kent, " met at the house of John Swan, Innholder 
at Peekskill," and Beverly Robinson, the other commissioner, 
not appearing they adjourned to his house, where they were all 
duly sworn by Judge Henry Yandenburg. On October 17th, 1771, 
they " met at tlie house of Thomas Smith on said lot." The 
surveyor was Benjamin Morgan, who had divided the lot into 
farms in 1762, and the chain bearers were Samuel Gregory, . 
Jacob Kniffen, Isaac Everitt, Isaac Ganung and John Utter. 
The first thing done was to "run_theout bounds of the lot" 
and as this locates many ancient land marks it is given in full: 

West Line. " Thursday 17 October 1771, began to run the 
out bounds Present, Beverly Robinson, Thomas Belden, and 
Moss Kent Esqrs. Began at a stake and a heap of stones on 

' An old house stood south of the Phihpse mansion, near the corner, and was 
owned by various persons wlio in turn held the south half of the original farm. 
About 1777,. Charles Cullen, who married Lucy, daughter of Rev. Elisha Kent 
and aunt of Chancellor Kent, came from Milltown in Southeast, and lived on t'lis 
place till the time of his death in 17S4. 

19 



290 HISTORY OF PUTNAil COUNTY. 

top of a hill by a walnut sappling, marked M. P'. on the west 
side and P.P. on the east side and 1753 on the north side, which 
heap of stones lyes in the line of the Manor of Cortland, and 
is also the southeasterly corner of Lot No. o, belonging to Col. 
Roger Morris. Then ran by line of Lot No. 5, IS". 9 degrees, 9 
minutes E, formerly N. 10 E. 963 chains 46 links. At 28 chains 
crossed a run of water; runs to the right; at 33 crossed a road; 
at 34 Benj. Thompson's house; 3 chains to right; at 83 crossed 
road; at 84 crossed Peter Mabie's house; at 94, ch. 42 1. a 
hickory sapling, found the angle to contain 15 minutes; then 
runs N. 8, 54 E. at 163.42 a dead tree, in Michael Sloat's field; 
at 179.85 a hickory tree; thence N. 8,48 E; at 235 crossed a run 
of water, runs to right; at 244 James Beldens house 50 links to 
right; at 246 crossed Belden's barn, at 273 made monument of 
stones on south side of road' in a run of water about 1 chain 
from Gabriel Carpenter's house on lot 6, at 276 crossed Fish 
brook, at 278 where Dea. Hamblin's saw mill formerly stood, 3 
ch. to right; and John McLean's house 4 ch. to right, at 294 
James Sear's house 8 ch. to right, at 308 Eleazor Hamblins 
6 ch. to right, at 357.50 crossed brook runs to right', at 358 
Wm. Meads 2 ch. to right, at 387 black oak formerly 
marked, at 391 a red ash tree, at 392 another at 419 a rock, 
corner to Jesse Smith's farm, now widow Hall, on which 
we laid a heap of stones, at 436.80 crossed the west branch of 
Croton River; at 450 David Frost's house 3 ch. to right; at 
452 a barn 1 ch. to right, at 452.75 a flat rock, on north 
side of road marked M.R.P.P'. at 459 top of hill (here troubled 
with mineral) at 485 chestnut tree, at 492 a steep preci- 
pice of rocks at bottom of which we marked a hickory tree', 
at 511 came to Pine Pond brook, at 517 crossed brook, runs to 
right, at 650 made a monument of stones in Charles Townsend's 
field; at 578 made a monument of stones in Robert Fuller's field 
on a large flat rock, at 593 made a monument of stones between 
2 white oak trees both standing on the S.W. point of a knoll 
and S.W. edge of swamp, at 602 came to an island in swamp, 

' These lettei-s stand for Morris and Philipse. 

-This is on road from Carmel to Lake Mahopac, at the Alvah Hopkins place, 
noxv Townsend Secor's heirs, a sliort distance east of road running north to the 
Crane Burying ground. 

^Tliis is at the house of James Harvey Reed, on road to Long Pond. 

••At house of George Smalley, on road to Coles Mills. 

•■■This is on the Countv Alms House farm. 



TOWy OF CARMEL. 291 

at 625 to Pine Pond at 667 the upper end of pond, at 700, 
monument of stones in south edge of a cleared field, at 722 
Daniel Taylors house li- ch. to right, at 760 a cleared field, at 
780 a heap of stones; at 786 crossed small brook, runs to right 
at 790 another, at 807 monument of stones south side fence 
Jonathan Dickinson's field; at 817 crossed a small brook, runs 
to right in a swamp, at 947 a black oak tree on top of a high 
mountain, in all 962 chains, 46 links, along a line of old marked 
trees, and terminates at a chestnut oak tree on north side of 
the high mountain on a rock 25 links S. by E. from where the 
rock makes a j)recipice 7 links deep." 

JYorfh Line. "Begun at the chesnnt oak tree and run N. 
86 deg. E formerly N. 87 E; at 13 chains crossed road to Fish- 
kill on east side of which we made a monument of stones round 
an Alder bush; at 25 ch. a small brook running to right, on east 
side of swamp; at 33 a large single rock in the line on west de- 
clivity of a mountain, 13 links high; at 47 crossed brook, runs 
to right; at 60 made monument of stones on west side of hill 
and edge of clear field; at 104 John Russell's house 4 ch. to 
right; at 121 crossed small brook, runs to right; at 123 another; 
at 164 Samuel Barrads house 4 cli. to left; at 195 crossed road; 
at 223 crossed Camj^bells brook', runs to right; at 242 crossed 
road, in all, 246,41 to large heap of stones the centre of which 
8 links N, 63,30 E, from a white oak tree formerly marked with 
the letters P. R. 1753 and have now caused a rock to be marked 
with the letters R.P. distant 34 links'; being the K. W. corner 
of Lot 7 on the west side of Bear Hill." 

East Line. "Began at the corner of lot 7 at the heap of 
stones of west side Bear Hill, and ran S. 9 deg. W; at 23.90 
made a monument of stones on west side of road: at 48 chains in 
Campbell's brook on north side made a monument of stones; at 
49 Edward Smith's house 2 ch. to right; at 64.14 two black oak 
trees, three stones laid between them now grown fast; at 80 an 
old monument of stones 4 1. to left; at 103 David Hill's house, 
to right; at 140 made a monument of stones on S. side of road 
to FishkilF; at 160.28 a tree on top of mountain; at 228.50 Benj. 

'Tliis is the brook that runs by the raili-oad station at Reynoldsville. 

'This northeast corner of lot 6 is the northwest corner of the land of Silas Ab- 
bott at Reynoldsville station in town of Pawling and 48 chains north of where 
the brook crosses the road south of station. 

^Tliis is on tlie town line between Kent and Patterson about ou rods west of the 
school house in District No. 8, Patterson. 



292 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

Hatcli-s house to ri^ht; at 240 a meadow; at 290 John Wilson's 
house' 5 ch. to right; at 320.46 a monument of stones 10 Least 
which is the south west corner of Lot 7, and N.W. corner of 
Lot 8; at 401.38 a monument on N. W.side of road at 403 Joshua 
Conklin's house 4 ch. to left; at 500 a stake in Edward Rice's 
field; at 527 crossed the east end of Gilbert Clajop's house; at 
529 crossed road; at 539' crossed Rowland's mill brook; at 544 
a bend of brook, at 552 a monument of stones on N.E. side of 
road; at 562 the east end of Wm. Merritt's barn the remains of 
an old house 40 links to right; at 640.69 the hickory sapling on 
S. side of hill corner to lots 8 and 9'; at 665 Justice Sprage's old 
house 1 ch. 17 L. west' at 670 crossed small brook, runs to left; 
at 691 David Vickery's 2 ch. to right; at 748 a tree; at 784 a 
tree; at 800 the east end of John Haines house: at 803 stones on 
N. side of road; at 816 John Smith's house, 3 ch. to left; at 824 
crossed brook; at 881 Rowland's mill brook; at 882 a road: at 
974 the north side of the east branch of Croton in line of Cort- 
land Manor." 

South Line. " Began at corner and went S. 88 W. ; at 5 2 ch. 
crossed the west branch of Croton; at 54 crossed road; at 114.72- 
a laro-e stone set in the ground between the lots of Mr. Andrew 
Johnston and Samuel Bayard on the Manor of Cortland shown 
by Mr. Hackaliah Brown to be in the Manor line 1 ch. 17 L. to 
left; at 178,50 or great brook, runs to left on east side of a 
bogo-y meadow; at 210 a tree, in all 239.50 to the beginning heap 
of stones, which course is now S. 87 W. formerly due west, 
along a line of old marked trees." 

The lot was then divided into 16 lots; two field books and 
maps were made. One of the field books is in the county 
clerk's office in Poughkeepsie, and one of the maps is in the 
office of the secretary of State; where the others are no one 
knows. The notice of the division and the time when the ballot- 
ing for the lot was to be done were "advertised in Hugh Gaine's 
Newspaper for six weeks." The balloting was on the 4th day 

'This is wiiere the house of Lewis G. Robinson now stands, in town of Kent. 

•All s(nith of the 527 chain is in the town of Carmel. " Rowlands mill brook '' 
is the middle branch of Croton. 

Tor location of this corner see sketch of Southeast. 

■■This is where the house of LeGrand Hughson stands, south of wliere the New 
York & Northern R. R. crosses the road near town line. 



TOWN OF CARMEL. 293 

of February, 1771, "at the house of Samuel Francis, Inn 
keeper in the city of New York." On balloting Margaret 
Ogilvie drew Lots 1, 5, 10, 14; Xathaniel Philipse drew Lots 4, 
6, 12, 15; Adolpli Philipse drew Lots 2, S, 11, 13; Frederick 
Philipse drew Lots 3, 7, 9, 16. 

In tli,e year 1777 Nathaniel Philipse was killed at the Battle 
of Germantown, and his share fell to his eldest brother, Adolph 
Philipse. Adolph Philipse died June Sth, 1785, leaving no 
children, and by his will left his share to his brother, Frederick 
Philipse, during his life and then to go to his daughter, Mary 
Philipse, who afterward married Samuel Gouverneur. Mar- 
garet Ogilvie died in 1807, and her share went to Frederick 
Philipse, her only surviving child. Thus the whole of the 
original lot became tbe property of Frederick Philipse. In 
1811 he released to his daughter, Mary Gouverneur, all his life 
interest in the share of his brother Adolph, and thus Samuel 
and Mary Gouverneur became the owners of one half the lot 
and Frederick Philipse owned the other half. These parties, 
who had previously leased their farms to tenants, began to sell 
about the year 1811, and the deeds given by them would make 
a volume of themselves, as all the titles to land in Lots 6, 8 and 
2, of the original Philipse Patent, go back to them, except such 
small tracts as had been previously sold by Philip Philipse and 
Margaret Ogilvie. 

The original bill for lawyer" s services in the partitions is still 
preserved and is given as a curiosity. 

" The Proprietors of Lot No. 6 of Philipse Patent in Dutchess 
County. 

" To Peter Van Schaack, Dr. 

" To Counsil in devising the Mode of Proceeding on 

the Partition Act £19 

" To long Advertisement of Adolphe Philipse, draft 

& copy 1 16 

" Notification of appointment of commissioners 

draft and copy 

" Draft and copy 'notice of balloting . 

" Minute of all the Commissioner's proceeding from 

the beginning to the conclusion .... 
" 2 fair copies entered in Books to be liled in the 

Clerk's office ....... 

" Attendani.'e on ballotins: and devisimr the mode . 



12 

1 9 






2 17 





2 17 
1 10 






£12 00 






294 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

" New York, 24 Oct., 1785, Rec'd the contents in full. 

" Peter Van Schaack." 

village of carjiel. 

Prior to the Revolution and for some years later Carmel, as a 
village, had no existence. All the land in the vicinity \v;is held 
in large farms by tenants who paid their yearly rents to the 
agent of the Philipse family or to the landlord himself when 
he came to his estate. All the land on the west side of Lake 
Gleneida or Shaw's Pond, as it was then known, was part of 
Lot No. 8 in the division of the original Lot No. 6, and fell to 
Adolph Philipse, and from him to his neice, Mary Gouverneur. 
David Myrrick had been a tenant of a farm on this tract from the 
time before the Revolution, and continued so till September 13th, 
1811, when Samuel Gouverneur and his wife sold him the farm of 
127 acres, bounded north by the outlet of Shaw's Pond, or Mill 
Brook, and including all the west shore of the pond as far 
soiTth as the Belden farm, and here he lived and died, and his 
old house is still standing on the homestead of Mr. Chauncey 
Weeks, the present owner of the farm. The farm of Amos 
Belden included all the shore of the lake from the David Myr- 
rick farm to the south end of the lake, and extended west to 
Croton River, west branch, and south to the farm of Caleb 
Hazen, and included 316 acres of land. This farm had also been 
held by lease from a period befoi-e 1762, and was sold to Amos 
Belden by Frederick Philipse, December 16th, 1804'. The land 
at the south end of the pond was a farm originally held by 

'Thomas Belden came to this part of the country from Norwalk, Conn., and 
was agent for the PhUipse family, before the Revolution. His nephew, Amos 
Belden, was born July 13th, 1764, died May 4th, 1830, and was buried in the old 
Gilead burying ground. He was agent or land steward for Frederick Philipse 
and transacted most of his business in renting and selling land. He married 
Elizabeth Isaacs. Their cliildren were; Julia, wife of Hooker St. John; Charles, 
born March 10th, 1793, died February 22d, 18o8; George, born March 12th, 1795, 
died January 14th, 1855: Sally, wife of Rev. William Mitchell; Charlotte; Eliza- 
beth, wife of Edwin Crosby, of Croton Falls; Thomas, born 1802, died in Mexico 
in 1834: John, born 1805, died 1882; Frederick, born 1807, died in Texas in 1867; 
Benjamin J., born 1809, died in New York in 1858. 

George Belden married Sophia L. Miles, and their children are: Julia L., wife 
of Frederick S. Talmadge, and Laura, wife of Dudley Field, both of New York. 

Charles Belden married Helen, daughter of Dr. William Miles. He had two 
children: Helen E., who died young; and George Mortimer Belden, born Novem- 
ber 3d, 1826, died October 7th, 1873, married Isabella, daughter of Levi Best, who 
survives him. 



TOWN OF CARMEL. 295 

John Myrrick as tenant in 1766. It was subsequently held by 
other persons and was sold by Frederick Philipse to William 
H. Seeley, May 25th, 1815. It was then described as " begin- 
ning at the northeast corner of Isaac Myrrick' s land, and run- 
ning east along the pond 17 chains 24 links, to land of John 
Ellis, then along the same S. 78 degrees E, 1 chain 85 links, 
then south 17 chains to a chestnut near Horse pound road; 
thence along the road to opposite Capt. Philipse house, and 
then along the road to nearly opposite Fletcher Hopkin's 
house," containing 107 acres. All the land on the east side of 
Shaw's Pond, from the James Dickinson farm to where the 
Baptist Church now stands and including all the present village 
of Carmel, was in 1766 held as a farm by Silas Washburn. This 
was, however, divided into smaller lots and owned by various 
persons at the beginning of the century. 

Judge Edward Smith, in a conversation with Charles H. Lud- 
ington, December 25th, 1854, related several interesting remin- 
iscences. The judge was then in his 84th year but his memory 
was unimpaired. In this conversation he stated that he re- 
membered many incidents of the Revolution and was thirteen 
years old at its close. He recollected seeing Gen. Washington 
when marching through the country with his army, and saw 
him pass "where John Fowler now lives." ' Within his recol- 
lection there were only three houses where Carmel now is. One 
was on the east side of the street, and on the north corner of 
the road running east. This was the honse of Samuel Wash- 
burn, and is marked on Erskine's military map, made in 1780. 
This place was occupied by David Kelley in 1854, and is now 
owned by Lewis Ga Nun. Another house stood where Smalley" s 
Hotel now stands, on the west side of the street, and about ten 
rods north of the road running to the lake. Elder Nathan Cole 
lived there at the time of the Revolution. Col. Thomas Taylor 
kept a store there just before it was demolished. Tanner's 
Hotel stood there in 1854. The third house was a log house, 
and stood on the west side of the street, about ten rods south 
of the Methodist church on the opposite side. Charles Knox 
was living there in 1854, at the time of the conversation. 

Tliere was another house standing on the north side of the 

' John Fowler was son of Dea. Solomon Fowler. His house was on the road 
close to the west line of Patterson, and now owned by heirs of John Henion. 
This was the homestead of Dea. Solomon Fowler. 



296 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

road running east from the village. This house was the house 
of Joshua Myrrick during the Revolution. It was torn down 
many years ago by Ebenezer Kelley, Esq., to make room for 
the mansion now owned by his son, Thomas Kelley. In 1815 
Stephen Swift owned a tract at the south end of the village. 
This was said to be bounded on the south "by Frederick 
Philipse Carmel town farm." This tract began on the south 
line of the present school house lot and ran north along the 
pond 10 chains and 86 links. It extended east far enough to 
include twenty-five acres. Next north of Stephen Swift along 
the pond was the land of James Mead. In 1815 "Stephen 
Swift and wife Katy" sold to Judah Kelley, Abraham Everett 
and Beverly Smith, trustees of School District No. 5, a lot "Be- 
ginning on the line between said Swift and Frederick Phili^^se, 
and thence along the wall by the road 50 feet; then east 50 feet; 
thence along Swift's land 50 feet; thence west along Philipse 
60 feet, containing 9^ rods more or less." This was the old 
school house lot and was on the east side of the road, at the 
north point of the park, directly opposite the present school 
building. The old school house stood on that site till about 
thirty yeai's ago, when it was moved away, and is at the pres- 
ent time used as a tenement house on the premises of Miss 
Charlotte Hopkins. A second school building was then erected 
on the west side of the road just north of the present one; this 
remained till 1880 when the new school house was built. It was 
then removed and now, degraded from its former use, does duty 
as a lager beer saloon opposite the railroad station. 

At the time of the Revolution the principal stopping place 
for travellers was Samuel Washburn's tavern, which stood, as 
stated before, on the north side of the road running east from 
the village. This was the only inn for a long distance, the next 
nearest being John McLean's tavern, which stood on the road 
to Lake Mahopac, where the house of the late Townsend Secor 
now stands. " Conklin's tavern" is marked on Erskine's map 
as being on the road to Patterson, some three miles from Car- 
mel. There were not many houses in the village at the time 
when the county buildings were erected, but the business inci- 
dent to the county seat caused the population to increase and 
the village has had a healthy growth ever since. At the begin- 
ning of this century the land on the east side of the street, 
from the road south to a point below the Methodist Church, 



o 

m 7^ 




TOWN OF CARMEL. 297 

was owned by Gen. James Townsend. This was sold by Mm to 
bis son-in-law, Dr. Robert Weeks, who built a hotel on the cor- 
ner opposite the old Washburn House, and this was his home 
till the time of his death, which occurred May 14th, 1816, at 
the early age of 44. Dr. Weeks was a member of the Legisla- 
ture at the time of the establishment of Putnam county, and 
gave the land where the Court Hous« and county clerk's office 
now stand. He came to Cannel from Westchester county, prac- 
ticed his profession for twenty years and was one of the promi- 
nent men of the county. The hotel and land adjoining were 
sold to Lewis Ludington who conducted the business, and made 
it a famous resort for many years. It was torn down about 
thirty years ago, and the elegant residence of the Misses Lud- 
ington was erected in its place. 

The Smalley House stands on the site of the old home of 
Elder Nathan'^Cole. After his death it was owned by Stephen 
Warino- who kept a store. The hotel was built by Col. Thomas 
Taylor^who was born in Jamaica, Long Island, April 12th, 1784. 
He"^ came to Carmel and established a small hat factory in the 
south part of the town. He built the hotel about 1833. Dur- 
ing- his life he was a well known and prominent citizen, and was 
elected member of the Legislature, and held the office of 
sheriff. He died August 1st, 1865, at the age of eighty. After 
his death it was purchased by James J. Smalley, from whom it 
derived its present name. Few citizens enjoyed a greater popu- 
larity. He was twice elected member of Assembly, and was also 
sheriff of the county and county treasurer. He died in 1867, 
and the place passed into the hands of John Cornish, by whose 
heirs it is now owned. 

The Gleneida House was established as a hotel by David 
Lockwood about 1850, and was conducted by him till the time 
of his death. Since then it has been under the management of 
the present proprietor, David Lockwood, jr., and has a well 
merited reputation for excellence. 

Lake Gleneida.— This beautiful lake, which is one of the 
principal beauties of the landscape, was in early days known 
as Shaw's Pond, from Timothy Shaw, who was one of the 
earliest settlers in the town. This name, though of time hon- 
ored antiquity, was too plain and unpoetical to suit the fastid- 
ious taste of' modern times. Accordingly a meeting was held 
on the evening of December 21st, 1852, for the purpose of be- 



29S HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

stowing a new name upon what was justly considered the beauty 
of Carmel. This meeting was duly organized with Reuben D. 
Barnum as chairman, and Edward Crosby, clerk. A committee, 
consisting of William J. Blake, Noel E. Waring, James Ray- 
mond, J. D. Little and Samuel Washburn, was appointed to 
select an appropriate title. Several names were proposed, such 
as Como, Wassaic, Sagamore and Wicope, while one man, with 
Scripture in his mind, urged the name of Tiberius as being a 
very appropriate addition to the already well established name 
of Carmel. Rev. Henry G. Livingston, w-ho was then in Phila- 
delphia, wrote a letter in which he proposed the name of 
Gleneida. This was adopted by acclamation, and will doubt- 
less continue for all time to come. This beautiful sheet of 
water covers an area of 168 acres, and its depth exceeds 100 
feet in some places. Many years ago on the outlet of this lake 
there was a mill, which was owned by Daniel H. Cole, who 
bought the water right from the Philipse family. It descended 
to his son, Tillott Cole, who leased the right to draw water 
from the lake, to the city of New York. The old mill, of which 
some relics yet remain, was built more than a hundred years 
ago. 

At the meeting mentioned above the name of Lake Sagamore 
was given to Bean's Pond in Kent, while Lake Gilead received 
its present name in place of Crosby's Pond, by which name it 
was formerly known. 

Carmel Collegiate Institute and the Drew Ladies' Sem- 
inary. — The credit of being the founder of the Carmel Collegiate 
Institute is doubtless due to James Raymond, whose interest 
in its welfare continued till the day of his death. A company 
including many of the prominent citizens of the town, sub- 
scribers for stock in the enterprise, held a meeting at the Court 
House, August 23d, 1S4S, and elected Leonard K. Everett, 
Samuel Washburn, David Merritt, Samuel Myrrick, James 
Raymond, Azor B. Crane, Daniel D. Travis, Joseph E. M. 
Hobby, Eli Kelley, Jonathan Cole, Benjamin Bailey, Enos 
Hazen, Henry G-. Livingston, Lewis Doane and Harman R. 
Stephens, trustees of an "Association for building and estab- 
lishing a seminary of learning in or near the village of Carmel." 
The site selected for the building is a portion of the old 
James Dickinson farm which was then owned by Elisha Cole, 
who sold to the trustees above named live acres of land, Sep- 



TO WIN- OF CARMEL. 299 

tember 4th, 1848, for $1,000. The work was soon commenced 
and the building was raised October 30th, 1849, upon which 
occasion Rev^. Epenetus Benedict, the well known minister and 
teacher of Patterson, delivered an address. The raising was 
finished November 5th, the last "bent" being elevated in its 
place by the ladies of the village with the help of pulleys. 
Before the building was finished a sad accident occurred. 
Theodore Howes, a young man of 25, fell from a scaffold and 
was killed September 10th, 1850. The cost of the edifice was 
much larger than was expected, and there being some diffi- 
culty in procuring sufficient funds, the trustees procured the 
passage of a special Act of Legislature, April 10th, 1850, by 
which the controller was authorized to loan to the county of 
Putnam the sum of $6,000, and the Board of Supervisors were 
• authorized at their discretion to loan that sum to the Carmel 
Collegiate Institute, upon receiving sufficient security. The 
supervisors, at a meeting held in May, 1850, declined to accept 
the loan and incur the responsibility, and this source of assist- 
ance failed. The amount necessary to complete the work was 
furnished by Mr. James Raymond, and the institute was opened 
September 16th, 1851, with Rev. S. G. Manwarring, as prin- 
cipal. By his untimely death, which occurred in 1852, the in- 
stitution met with a severe loss. By an informal agreement be- 
tween the stockholders it was resolved that the whole establish- 
ment should be transferred to Mr. Raymond upon his supply- 
ing the means to finish the building. No deed was given, and 
after the death of Mr. Raymond, which occurred March 23d, 

1854, a suit was begun which resulted in a sheriff's deed being 
given for the premises to Mrs. Julia Raymond, December 4th, 

1855, and it was transferred by her to her daughters, Ada 
Weeks, Sarah R. Livingston and Mary E. Drake, October 1st, 
1858. 

These parties sold the institute to Daniel Drew, May 4th, 
ISOO, for $25,000. This was the first step in a great educational 
enterprise contemplated at that time by Mr. Drew in his native 
town, viz., the founding and endowment of a seminary for both 
sexes, with a collegiate department for ladies and also of a 
theological seminary, the latter being afterward located at 
Madison, N. J. 

Mr. Drew immediately placed Prof. George Crosby Smith in 
charge of the institute, with instructions to make such changes 



300 



IIISTOEl' OF PUTXAM COUNTY. 



and improvements as might be desirable. The buildings were 
thoroughly repaired, fitted for steam and gas, and refurnished 
throughout, and supplied with maps, charts, globes, philo- 
sophical and chemical apparatus, and a very choice library of 
3,000 volumes. The grounds, which are ample, were beautified 
and means procured for supplying an abundance of pure water 
from the lake. The school was opened September 20th, 1866, 
under the title' of the Drew Ladies' Seminary, with a full board 




DREW LADIES" SEMINARY.— FRONT VIEW. 



of teachers, and with thorough courses of study, elementary, 
academic and collegiate, and with well equipped departments 
of art and music. 

An Act "To incorporate the Drew Seminary and Female 
College " was passed April 23d, 1866, by which Daniel Drew and 
others were constituted a body corporate with full powers to 
establish the college. This corporation was organized March 13th, 



TOWN OF CARMEL. 301 

1S67, by the election of Bishop Edmund S. Janes, president; 
Ambrose Ryder, secretary; Henry J. Baker, treasurer; and an 
executive committee; but, owing to the incompleteness of Mr. 
Drew's plans the institution did not then, and has not since, 
come under their supervision and control. 

Subsequently, however, it was conveyed in trust to Mr. Daniel 
D. Chamberlain to hold for the purposes of the school, and 
under an obligation to deed it "in fee " to the board of corpo- 
rators when they were ready to receive it, and in this condition 
it remains at the present time, and is in charge of Prof. Smith, 
who has had the entire administration of its affairs from the 
beginning. 

The buildings are located on an eminence overlooking the 
village, and commanding a fine prospect in all directions. 





DRE^\ L.A.DIES SEMI> ART .—REAR VIEW. 

and are justly deemed the pride and ornament of the vil- 
lage. 

As an institution of learning the seminary holds an honorable 
position among the female colleges of the State, and under its 
present principal it exerts 'a wide spread influence for good. 
For beauty and healthfulness of location it is unsurpassed and 
presents every attraction that can render an educational home 
delightful. 

In 1S72 preparations for erecting a new building for the 
" Drew Seminary and Female College " were made on a very 
extensive scale. The editice, which was to be "400 feet in 
length and surmounted by a tower one hundred and thirty-five 
high," was intended to replace the building now in existence. 



302 HISTORY OF PrjTNAM COUNTY. 

On the 1st of October, 1872, the ground was broken "by- 
Master Henry D. Clapp in the name of his grandfather," the 
ceremony being accompanied with suitable religious exercises, 
and public expectation was raised to the highest point in an- 
ticipation of the speedy completion of an institution which 
would be monumental in character and of lasting benefit to 
the entire community. The foundations of the building (which 
was to be located south of the present seminary) were scarcely 
laid when the financial reverses which overtook its generous 
founder put a stop to all further proceedings and the enter- 
prise was never, carried to completion. Some of the stones 
prejiared for the building were used for the new county clerk's 
office. 

Cakmel Literaey Union.— In 1868 the want of a public 
library was felt in the village of Carmel, and steps were taken 
to supply it. The Carmel Library Association was formed, to 
which nearly all the families of the vicinity subscribed. The 
president of the association was Rev. AVilliam S. Clapp, pastor 
of the Baptist church; James D. Little was the secretary; Gil- 
bert T. Ludington, treasurer; Herman Best, librarian; and G. 
Mortimer Belden, William S. Clapp, Ambrose Ryder, Jonathan 
Cole, Byron E. Hazen, Noble P. Barnes, James D. Little and 
J. Addison Fowler, directors. A library of over nine hundred 
volumes was formed and put into circulation, many of the books 
having been contributed by members who took more than an 
ordinary interest in its success. Among the chief donors were 
Daniel D. Chamberlain and G. Mortimer Belden. The payment 
of five dollars to the treasurer constituted a life membership, 
which was taxed at the rate of one dollar per year; and persons 
not members of the association could obtain its privileges, in the 
discretion of the librarian, upon making payments to him at 
the rate of one dollar per quarter. The association established 
a reading room at the residence of the librarian, which was open 
every day except Sundays and holidays, and for a time was 
well patronized. After the first year, however, interest waned, 
the receipts failed to meet expenditures, a debt of some size 
accumulated, and no attempt to perpetuate it was made. The 
books of the library were I'emoved to the vestibule of the Bap- 
tist church, where they were under the charge of no particular 
officer, and as no one was responsible for them a large propor- 
tion became scattered amongst the members of the society, and 



TOWy OF CARMEL. 303 

were lost or destroyed. After a few years the remnant of them 
was again removed to the residence of Rev. W. S. Clapp. 

In 1881, they were transferred by Mr. Clapp and his son to 
the Literary Union, of Carrael, New York, a society of young 
people, and through their care and efforts a public library has 
been re-established. 

The Literary Union, a literary and social organization, was 
formed by a party of young ladies and gentlemen at the resi- 
dence of Rev. W. S. Clapp, February 23d, ISSl. The original 
members were Rev. Matthew A. Bailey, Rev. J. M. Yeager, 
Rev. D. D. Sahler, Frank H. Greene, William H. Foster, Henry 
D. Clapp, Gilbert R. Livingston, Edward J. Wilson, Professor 
S. O. Spencer, Emma J. Wood, Emma J. Foster, Marilla C. 
Foster, Bessie C. Foster, Ida A. Turner, Carrie A. Trowbridge, 
Georo-iaE. Ludington, EmmaC. Miller and Anna C. Little, and to 
this list many other names were soon added. The Rev. Matthew 
A. Bailey, formerly of the town of Kent, now of St. Johnland, 
L. I., was the first president of the society, and his successors 
have been Clayton Ryder, Emma J. Foster, Professor S. O. 
Spencer, Frank H. Greene, Emma J. Wood, James A. Foshay, 
Edward. J. Wilson, Ottis H. Cole, Henry D. Clapp and Edwin 
H. Abrams. 

In March, 1SS2, the society was incorporated under the laws 
of the State, and has since continued to flourish. 

Railroad.— Previous to the building of the New York and 
Northern Railroad, the principal mode of communication with 
the outside world was by stages which ran from Carmel to 
Croton Falls where they connected with the Harlem Railroad. 

The project of a more direct communication by means of a 
railroad was long agitated, and in 1870 the scheme seemed likely 
to be fulfilled. The 13th of February was a great day for Car- 
mel, for on that day ground was broken for the new railroad. 
This ceremony was performed by the Rev. William S. Clapp, 
who threw the first shovel full of earth. A large concourse of 
people were present and the usual speeches were delivered. But 
Carmel had to wait many years before the road was completed 
for the work was hindered by constant delays. The first train 
from Carmel was on December 23d, 1880, and six passengers 
and thii-ty-nine cans of milk were the first freight. The road 
was finished to Brewster in February, 1881. The bridge over 
the railroad, at the Carmel depot, was built in October, 1871, 



304 JIISTORy OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

many years before the road was completed. The road does a 
large business and is under the able management of Frank S. 
Gannon, general superintendent. 

PuTiN'AM County National Bank. — The Putnam County 
National Bank, located at Carrael, N. Y., was organized March 
14th, 1S65, being the nine hundred and seventy sixth bank to 
organize under the National Banking Act, the controller of 
the currency writing: "I have doubted the expediency of sanc- 
tioning the organization of another bank in New York (State) 
but have concluded on the papers furnished to make your ap- 
plication an exception." 

The Bank of Commerce, then doing business at^Carmel, was 
entitled to organize under the national system, to the exclusion 
of any other bank in the same place. Through successful ne- 
gotiations, this privilege was transferred to the new bank. 

The establishment of the bank was mainly due to the enter- 
prise of George Ludington, who was appointed its cashier and 
directed its management till his death. 

The capital stock was fixed at $100,000 and has remained 
unchanged. A surplus of §20,000 has been added from the 
earnings, while the dividends paid have more than equaled the 
capital and surplus, and the bank is now steadily paying its 
stockholders six per cent, per annum. 

The first presidennt was G. Mortimer Belden, who was suc- 
ceeded, January 12th, 1869, by Sylvester Mabie, who held the 
ofiice till his death, January 1st, 1SS6, and was succeeded by the 
present incumbent, Ambrose Ryder. Prominent among the of- 
ficers were Joseph W. Travis, who held the office of vice president, 
from January, 1874, until his death, August 12th, 1881, and 
Gilbert T. Ludington, who held the ofiice of assistant cashier 
during the first eleven years of the bank's existence. 

Ambrose Ryder succeeded George Ludington as cashier, and 
was in turn succeed by Hillyer "Ryder, the present occupant of 
the ofiice. The bank is owned by forty-five shareholders, of 
whom many are farmers. 

It has never failed to meet its obligations, though during the 
panic of 1837, it had an amount ou deposit greater than half its 
capital with the Fourth National Bank, of New York, which 
remained a number of days with closed doors. The present 
vice president is Anthony A. Akin, of Patterson. The directory 
consists of seven members as follows: Ambrose Rvder, A. A. 



TOWN OF CAR.MEL. 305 

Akin, David Kent, Henry Mabie, Coleman R. Barrett, S. Palmer 
and Henry F. Miller. 

George Ludington, son of Frederick and great-grandson of 
Col. Henry Liidington of Revolutionary fame, was born at Lud- 
ingtonville, in Kent, June 11th, 1S14. He commenced business 
as a merchant with his father at Ludingtonville. In 1856 he as- 
sisted in organizing the Bank of Kent of which he became cashier. 
In 1865 he removed to Carrael and organized the Putnam County 
National Bank. He was for a time commissioner of loans. He 
died April 11th, 1874. He was married, October 10th, 1843, to 
Emeline C. Travis of Carmel. Seven children were born to them 
of whom four are living: Gilbert T., of Carmel, who was for 
eleven years assistant cashier of Putnam County National 
Bank; Emma F., married to Rev. Walter Chadwick; T. Edward, 
of St. Paiil, Minn.; and Georgia E., living at home. 

PuTNAX Cou:^TY CouP.iER. — According to the " Gazetteer of 
New York," a newspaper was published in Carmel in 1814, but 
of this we have no further evidence. The name was the " Put- 
nam Republican" and it was printed by Thomas Smith. 

The "Putnam Democrat" was established by William H. 
Sloat, in 1841. It afterward passed into the hands of Elijah 
Yerks. James D. Little became editor subsequently. In Octo- 
ber, 1849, the name was changed to "Democrat Courier." 

January 10th, 1852, James D. Little purchased the paper and 
changed the name to "Putnam County Courier." Mr. Little 
sold the paper to Charles Benedict, in 1860. He transferred it 
to B. F. Armstrong, and in 1864, it came back into the posses- 
sion of Mr. Little, who sold it to J. J. McNally, in 1876. It 
was again in possession of Mr. Little, in 1879, and he remained 
the editor and proprietor till the time of his death in 1883. From 
that time until May 1st, 1885, it was edited by Miss Annie C. 
Little, his daughter. 

Mrs. J. D. Little has continued to edit it since her daughter's 
retirement. Mrs. Little is a sister of Hon. George M. Beebe, of 
Sullivan county, ex-governor of Kansas, ex-member of Congress 
and judge of Court of Claims of New York. 

PuTNAJt County Republican. — This Republican journal 
was founded by William J. Blake, June 12th, 1858, in the vil- 
lage of Caimel. It has always been a Rei^ublican organ of the 
party, and was the first Republican paper printed and published 
in Putnam county. When founded in 1858, its title was " Put- 

21) 



306 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

nam Free Press," and it was continued under that name until 
October, 1S6S, when its editor, publisher and proprietor sold it 
to Mr. A. J. Hicks, who changed its name to "The Gleneida 
Monitor,'* andsubsequenty to " The Putnam County Monitor," 
by which name he continued to publish it until February 14th, 
1880, when it was purchased by Miss Ida M. Blake, who changed 
the name to " Putnam County Kepublican," by which name it 
has since been published. 

Its first editor, publisher and proprietor, William J. Blake, 
since February, 1S80, has been its senior editor, and his oldest 
daughter, Ida M., from the above date has been its publisher, 
proprietor and junior editor. 

The Gilead Church. — The Presbyterian church in Carmel 
is the direct descendant and successor of the old Congregational 
church established at the time of the earliest settlement, and 
WHS, together with the church in Southeast, under the pastoral 
care of Rev. Elisha Kent. The two societies were distinguished 
as the " Eastern and Western Societies in Philipse Precinct." 
The Eastern Society built a log church about a mile east of 
Dykeman's Station, the exact location of which is fully de- 
scribed in the sketches of Southeast Church. The two societies 
were generally known in the olden time as the "Church at 
Philippi." The AVestern Society also built a log church at the 
northwest corner of what was afterward Lot 9 of the Philipse 
Patent. This meeting house stood on land now belonging to 
Elijah Fowler, very near the line between the towns of Carmel 
and Southeast, and on the west side of the road directly opi)o- 
site the old burying ground. The exact location of this is also 
fully described in the sketch of the town of Southeast. The 
exact date when this church was built is unknown. The first 
mention of it is in the survey of the Philipse Patent in 1754, 
in which it is mentioned as "An old meeting house." The 
probabilities are that it was built as early as 1745. 

Rev. Elisha Kent, who came to Southeast in 1743, was the 
pastor for some years of both these churches. The relation 
which existed between them is shown most conclusively by an 
entry in the minutes of the Fairfield Association of Connecticut. 
In January, 1749, " Mr. Joseph Crane appeared before the 
Association and applied in behalf of the Eastern Society of 
Philipse Precinct for a resolve as to what portion of time the 
Rev. Mr. Kent should be advised to preach among them, and 



TOWX OF CAiniEL. 307 

offering some reasons in behaif of said Eastern Society wliy 
tliey should enjoy his labors two thirds of the time. But tlie 
Association not having an opportunity to hear what Reasons 
ye Western Society of ye Precinct may have to offer to ye con- 
trary, do therefore advise that for the present Mr. Kent's labors 
for the Sabbaths be equally divided, considering also that ye 
said Eastern Society may enjoy the benefit of more frequent 
lectures.'' 

It will be seen from this that Mr. Kent had preached on alter- 
nate Sabbaths at each church, but as the Eastern Society was 
far the larger it is probable that this was the reason urged for 
claiming a larger portion of the time. We may remark here 
that Mr. John Spragg, who lived where Le Grand Hughson now 
lives, and very near the site of the ancient log church, was one 
of the commissioners who applied to the Eastern Association of 
Fairfield, Connecticut, for a minister in 1742, which resulted in 
the settlement of Mr. Kent in Southeast in 1743. 

This relationship between the two societies continued till 
about 1749 and shortly after this Rev. John Davenport came to 
Carmel. The history of this man would make a volume of 
itself. His great-grandfather was the first minister of New 
Haven, his father was pastor of Stamford, and his son was also 
a minister. He espoused thegreat religious movement of Whit- 
field and went to the utmost bounds of fanaticism. In Boston 
he made.great disturbance in the churches and in Connecticut 
he was put outside the State for his irregular proceedings. In 
fact his career was marked by a course of action which was 
half religion and half insanity. He finally came to himself, 
repented of his former actions, and his evident contrition caused 
him to be again received into the churches, and he was sent by 
the Synod as a missionary to Virginia in 1749. His labors in 
Carmel began in 1750 and while here he assisted in organizing 
the church at South Salem. He remained here till 1754. ' Shortly 
after this he died and was buried at Pennington, New Jersey, 
where his toml) bears the following lines : 

' It seems tliat in lTo3 the church at "West Philippi (Carmel) was bearing one- 
tliird of tlie salary of Rev. Mr. Davenport, probably in connection with Red Mills 
and at Patterson, although the last is doubtful and was more likely some church 
in "Westchester county. At that time he writes " That his stay at Philippi is 
doubtful as the Philippi Church would not continue to pay the third of his salary 
as thev wanted a minister of their own." 



308 HISTORY OF PUTXAM COUNTY. 

" O Davenport a Seraph once in clay 
A brighter Seraph now in heavenly day, 
How glowed thy heart with sacred love and zeal, 
How like to that thy kindred angels feel. 
Clothed in humility thy virtues shone 
In every eye illustrious but thine own, 
How like thy Master, on whose friendly breast 
Thou oft hast leaned and shall forever rest." 

The third pastor was Rev. Ebenezer Knibloe, a yonng Scotch- 
man who possessed in a marked degree the national peculiari- 
ties, and was a man of strongly pronounced opinions. He 
graduated from the University of Edinburgh, came to this 
country in 1752 and went to New Haven. It is supposed that 
he came to Carmel through the influence of Mr. Kent. When 
he came to America he brought with him a copy of the first 
edition of King James' Bible, which is still in possession of his 
descendants. The call to Mr. Knibloe was brief and to the 
point. 

"We the inhabitants of the Western Society of Philippi do 
unite and call Mr. Ebenezer Knibloe preacher of ye Gospel to 
take the pastoral care of us." 

This call was signed by Eleazar Hamblin, Shubael Rowley, 
Richard Cooms, John Sprague, Thomas Kelly, Cornelius Fuller, 
Thomas Colwell, Edward G-annung, Jacob Finch, Isaac Finch, 
Noah Burbank, Seth Dean. John Hains, Matthew Rowlee, Shu- 
bael Rowlee, John Paddock, James Colwell, Samuel Latham, 
Isaac Smith, Thomas Crosby, Francis Baker, Josej^h- Bangs, 
Thomas Frost, Joseph Hopkins, Hugh Bayley, David Honiwel, 
John Frost, Russell Gregory, Isaac Lyden, John Gannung, 
Edward Carver, Tho. Hinkley, jr., John Myrrick, Benj. How- 
land, Isacher Robinson, James Sears, Joseph Gregory, Isaac 
Chase, Elkanah Hinkley, Lazarus Griffith, Jacob Ellis, Jacob 
Ellis, jr., Simeon Ellis, Jabez Chase, John Finch, Seth Myrrick, 
Amos Fuller, John White, Daniel Townsend, John Barber, 
Matthew Burgess, Caleb Hazen, John Langdon, John Kelly, 
Jesse Smith, Joshua Hamblin, and Elisha Kellogg. 

The council for ordaining and installing Mr. Knibloe met at 
the house of Thomas Crosby, February ISth, 1756. There was 
a literary and theological examination in the morning and pub- 
lic service in the afternoon in the meetinghouse. The ministers 
present were Revs. James Beebe, Elisha Kent, Mr. Sill and Mr. 
Sacket. The first act of his ministry was the marriage of 



TOWN OF CAiniEL. ^'^-^ 

Ebenezer Robinson and Anne Stone, which took place the same 
evenin- Mr. Knibloe remained three years. He complained 
to the council that -The church had not fulfilled their engage- 
ments in re"-ard to temporals " and a committee promised _ An 
effort so that no complaint of the kind should be made again. 
He asked for a dismission and the society "Agreed to pay him 
a ce'rtain sum for his temporal interest in said place and so part 
in peace " The relation was dissolved July llth, 17o9. Mr. 
Knibloe went to Amenia, in Dutchess county, and there died. 
His descendants are now living in that place. Some of he 
papers of Mr. Knibloe are yet in existence, among them a list 
of marriages and baptisms during his ministry. From a few 
entries of a business nature it is learned that while in Carmel 
he lived with Thomas Crosby', and that his board was 26 shill- 

inss a month. " . ,. -r,, -t 

"' \ Register of Marriages in the West Society of Philipse 
Patent • Feb 18, 1756, Ebenezer Robinson, Anne Stone; March 
S 1756," Hezekiah Keeler, Kenturah Lynor of Danbury: June 
7' 1756 Eliiah White, Mercy Hopkins of East Society, Sept 16 
1756 John Barber, Thankful Hamblin; Nov. 3, 1756, Michael 
Evans, Hepsibah Sprague; Nov. 16, 1756, Wheaton Robinson, 
Phebe Crosby; Jan. 20, 1757, Joseph Gannung Elizabetli 
Kelloo-c.- Feb. 3, 1757. Daniel Gregory, Mary Comb; March 9, 

1758, Peter Mabie, Susannah Sunderlin; March 23, l/fS, Bar- 
zillai Kin-Lidia Hinkley ; March 23, 1758, Joseph Parnsh, Rutk 
Hinkley; June 15, 1758, John Langdon, Mary Purdy; Feb. IS, 

1759, Peter Hartwick, Jean Langdon.' ^ ^,.,- 

■ "A Reo-i.ter of Baptisms in the West Society of Philipse 
Patent since the Reverend Mr. Ebenezer Knibloe -as ordained 
minister of the Gospel there: March 8, A. D 1^56 Daniel 
Cranes' son Nathan; April 11, Eleazor Sprag-ue s son Reuben, 
andShubael Rowlees daughter Patience; May 9> /^mes Co - 
well's son Joshua; June 27, Seth Merrick s daughter Ruth, 
July 11, John Hain's twins Martha and Sybil, and David Hone- 
well's d'uio-hter Asenath; Jan. 2, 1757, Matthew Rowlee s son 
Eliiah- Feb U, The Worthy Mr. Moses-daughter Martha; 
MWi'l3 1757 Caleb Fowler was baptised and likewise on said 
d-iy his daughter Elizabeth; April 10, Hackaliah Brown's son 
Nathan and daughter, Wm. Stone s son Oliver, and Heman 

'Thomas Crosby lived south of the SeRunary iu Carmel. His farm iiicluded 
the Gilead burying grouud. 



310 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

King's son Stephen; April 17, Joseph Hopkins' daughter Han- 
nah; May 1, Caleb Fowler's daughter Sarah; May 8, Joshua 
Hamblin's daughter Sarah, Robert Fuller's son John, and 
Isaac Chase's sons Thomas, Josiah, Joel and Solomon and ye 
daughters Sarah, Elizabeth; May 22, Widow Huldah Eobin- 
son's son Issacher; June 5, Ebenezer Robinson's daughter Ann; 
July 10, Jonathan Hopkins' son Jonathan; July 24, Lazarus 
Griffin's daughter Phebe; July 31, Jacob Burges' son Dennis; 
Aug. 7, David E. Smith's son Samuel; Oct. 9, Joseph Gregory's 
son Reuben." 

The exact time when the old log meeting house ceased to be 
used, and a new church erected, is unknown. The first direct 
mention of the meeting house at Gilead which has been found, 
is in the survey of Lot 8 in 1762. It was standing then and 
Rev. Elnathan Gregory held as tenant a large farm south of it 
which extended south to what was then Dean's Pond, but now 
Lake Gilead. But there can be no doubt that it was standing 
at the time when Mr. Knibloe was installed, in 1756. This 
church remained till within the remembrance of the present 
generation. It was a plain building about fifty feet square and 
stood on the west end of the old burying ground at Gilead and 
some distance north of the road. A door on the south side 
opened directly in front of the pulpit and stairs led to the 
galleries. Around the walls were square pews for families, 
while nearer the pulpit were straight backed benches. The 
pulpit was "goblet shaped," elevated as was the custom in 
those times, and winding stairs led up to it. The building was 
repaired in 1802, and the modern stove was introduced in 1815. 
This stood near the center, and a straight stove pipe led up to 
the peak of the roof. This meeting house, which was in its day 
the only church for many miles around, stood till 1839. It 
was then torn down and the material sold to Peter S. Kent and 
carried to his farm in Patterson where it was used for out- 
buildings, which may now be seen on the homestead of Edison 
Smith in the town of Patterson. The pews sold in 1803 
for $202, and in 1806 for §154. The minister's salary in 1824 
was §200. The first deacons of the church were Eleazar Hamb- 
lin and Thomas Crosby. The former is said to have returned 
to Massachusetts at the beginning of the Revolution; the latter 
died at the beginning of this century at the age of 92. 

The next pastor was Rev. Elnathan Gregory, who, unlike his 



TOWN OF C ARM EL. 311 

predecessor, was intensely American, edncared in the school of 
Edwards and Belamy, and a natural orator. It is said that the 
church adoi:»ted its name from a sermon which he preached 
from the text " Is there no balm in Gilead?" His pastorate 
lasted about thirteen years, when he retired, but continued to 
live in Carrael. During his ministry the neighborhood was 
known as "Gregory's Parrish." Like most ministers of his 
time Mr. Gregory carried on a farm in connection with his more 
sacred calling. His farm was leased from the Philipse family 
and was situated south of the church and extended to Lake 
Gilead. He is said to have died in Carmel in 1S16, at ihe age 
of 82. He was a strong whig noted for his patriotism, and dur- 
ing the Eevolution a price was set on his head. The next min- 
ister was Rev. David Close, who was called in 1774. His charge 
embraced both Carmel and Patterson, but he is said to have 
been in the former place two years before coming to Carmel. 
He was a graduate of Yale College and took a deep interest in 
the Dutchess County Presbytery. His ministry lasted during 
the Revolution and he died in Patterson in 1783.' He married 
a Miss Comstock, but left no children. 

His successor was Rev. Mr. Burritt and the Presbytery met 
at his house in Carmel, December 1st, 1783. The war had 
caused great suffering and made many changes. He had been 
so greatly reduced in circumstances that the Presbytery com- 
mended him by official letter to the benevolence of the Christian 
public. 

In 1774 the church, which had previously been Congregational, 
became Presbyterian. A letter from Mr. Kent to Dr. Belamy, 
written during the pastorate of Mr. Gregory, states that the 
" Separatists and Sandemanians were disturbing the congrega- 
tion with their errors:" The former urged higher sanctity and 
claimed it for themselves; the latter were the followers of Rev. 
John Sandeman, who died in Danbury in 1771, and who taught 
that an intellectual faith was sufficient for salvation without a 
change of heart. 

For some years after the Revolution tlie church seems to have 
been broken up and disorganized, but it was reorganized in 
1792. 

" Frederickstown, Aug. 9. 1792. 

'• We the subscribers, members of ditferent churches and of 

'Soe Sketch of Presbyterian Cluirch, Patterson. 



312 HISTOEY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

the former church in this place, now dissolved, living in the 
vicinity commonly known as Gregory's Parrish, considering it 
the duty of Christians to join together and form churches 
wherever God in his Providence may cast their lot and finding 
ourselves under such circumstances and no church in this 
parish which we may join * * have after mature delibera- 
tion judged that we ought to unite in covenant as a visible 
church and Messrs. Ichabod Lewis, Jehu Minor, Amzi Lewis 
and Silas Constant, Ministers of the Gospel having by our re- 
quest convened in order to assist us we have therefore adopted 
and publicly received the following articles and covenant." 
Then follow the usual articles of faith, and the covenant is 
signed by John Ambler, Matthew Beale, Philetus Phillips, 
Zebulon Phillips, John Merrick, John McLean, Jabez Truesdale, 
Kebecca Hopkins, Mary Hopkins, Desire Stone, Mary Haines, 
Lucy Cullen,' Bethice Truesdell, Esther Phillips and Elizabeth 
Merrick. Rev. Ichabod Lewis is said to have preached here 
from 1792 till the time of his death in 1793, and at the same 
time was pastor of the church in Southeast. 

Rev. James Hickox was licensed in 1793 and preached at 
Gilead and Red Mills until 1803. He was succeeded by Rev. 
Stephen Dodd who came in June, 1803, and also had charge of 
the church at Red Mills. He removed to Salem, July 15th, 
1810. 

Rev. Herman Dagget came to this place from Northampton, 
Mass., and was pastor both here and at Red Mills. The two 
churches gave a very meagre support. He remained two years 
and then became principal of an academy at North Salem, and 
was subsequenth' in charge of a foreign mission school for 
educating heathen youth at Cornwall, Conn. 

Rev. Allen Blair, the next pastor, was a native of Ireland 
and was apprenticed to a weaver. He obtained a good English 
education and taught school at Red Mills. After studying 
under Rev. Amzi Lewis he was licensed to preach in 1795. He 
became pastor here in 1812 and remained till 1815. He was stated 
supply at Red Mills for many years. He died in 1829, 
aged 72. 

Rev. James N. Austin was born at Red Mills and was pastor 
here from 1815 to 1818. Since that time the pastors have been: 

' Lucy Cullen was the daughter of Rev. Elisha Kent and the widow of Charles 
Cullen. 



TOWX OF CARilEL. 313 

Rev. Abner Bnindage, 181S-21; Isaac Allerton, two years; 
Asaliel Brunson preached here and at Yorktown 3 years; Benaiah 
Y. Morse preached here and at Red Mills 6 years; George T. 
Todd, 1836; Henry G. Livingston, 1845-49'; Rutgers Van Brunt, 
1850-53; Henry G. Livingston was supply till 1856; Samuel W. 
Crittenden, 1857; Henry G. SmuUer, 1858-63; Saurian E. Lane, 
1863-68; Israel W. Cochrane, 1869; Daniel D. Sahler, 1870-82; 
A. W. Colver, stated supply; RoUin A. Sawyer, present pastor. 

Rev. Daniel Du Bois Sahler, who was for twelve years 
pastor of the Gilead Presbyterian Church of Carmel, was born 
in Kingston, Ulster county, N. Y., in 1829. His parents, Abra- 
ham Du Bois and Eliza (Hasbrouck) Sahler, were both residents 
of that place and were representatives of old families of the 
couniy. 

Mr. Sahler" s early education was obtained at the schools in 
Kingston and after finishing a preparatory course he entered 
college at Princeton, N. J., where he graduated. He then en- 
tered Princeton Theological Seminary, and at the conclusion of 
his course of study in that institution he was ordained and in- 
stalled pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Red Bank, N. J. 
In this place he remained several years, his labors being much 
blessed and his church membership increased. He then accepted 
a call to the Congregational Church of Sheffield, Mass., his 
pastorate lasting five years, and in 1870 he received an invita- 
tion to become the pastor of the Gilead Presbyterian Church of 
Carmel, N. Y,, and was installed May 2d, 1871. 

The pastorate thus begun continued till the time of his death 
whicli occurred November 11th, 1882. His mortal remains were 
laid to rest in Woodlawn Cemetery. He died in the midst of 

'Rev. Henry G. Livingston, son of Rev. Gilbert Livingston, D.D., was born at 
Coxsackie, N. Y., February 3d, 1821, graduated from Williams College in 1840, 
and November 1st of same year became principal of Clinton Academy, East- 
hampton, L. I. He entered the Theological Seminary in 1842, and preached 
his first sermon at Easthampton, L. I., September 29th, 1844. On October 2Tth 
of that year he first preached at Carmel and remained as pastor till November 
8th, 1849, when he resigned to take charge of the Third Reformed Church of 
Philadelphia. He remained there till 18.)3 when failing health compelled him to 
resign, and he returned to Carmel and took charge of Raymond Collegiate Insti- 
tute. Under his care the institution was very prosperous, but his earthly career 
was cut short by untimely death January 27th, 1855, at the age of 34. Mr. Liv- 
ingston married Sarah, daughter of James Raymond. Their children are Gilbert 
R. and Julia R.. now living in Carmel. Mr. Livingston was a descendant in the 
fifth generation from Rev. Elisha Kent, the first minister of Southeast. 



314 HISTORY OF putna:m COU>'Tr. 

his work, and in the full energy of Christian manhood, and his 
untimely departure was lamented by a large circle of devoted 
friends. The memorial service in his honor was attended by 
the largest congregation that had ever attended the church 
where he labored so faithfully and so well. 

Mr. Sahler was a truly consecrated minister of Jesus Christ. 
His one idea of preaching was to win souls. All his sermons 
were carefully prepared with this end in view, and so were plain, 
practical and thoroughly scriptural, and his labors were rich 
with results for the world to come, and his pastorate was not 
only the longest since the days of Gregory, but the most 
fruitful. 

He was a pastor in the real sense of that term and the truth 
he preached on the Sabbath was illustrated and enforced by his 
life, conversation and personal efforts during the week, and as 
one who knew him well remarked, " a large part of his i^reach- 
ing was done outside the pulpit.'" 

His social temperament and genial disiDOsition made him ever 
a welcome guest not only in the homes of his own people but 
in the homes of all who had the pleasure of his acquaintance. 
In times of sorrow his qtiick, sympathetic nature made him ever 
ready to administer consolation, and many a heart bowed down 
w-ith grief has been cheered and comforted by his tender loving 
words. 

He was a man of broad culture, and always kept himself 
abreast with the wants of the times. While giving self-sacri- 
ficing attention to every interest associated with the Church of 
the Lord Jesus, he was always at the front in all reforms for the 
good of mankind, and thus he endeared himself not only to his 
immediate congregation but to the entire community. Fitted 
by education and taste for the most varied associations he gave 
himself wholl^^ to his church and its neighborhood. His powers 
of adaptation made him successful with all. He was an evan- 
gelist in the remoter districts of the county. He was the helper 
of the friends of purity and temperance. In the intellectual 
development of young people he was enthusiastic and untiring. 
In the association of ministers of Putnam county and vicinity 
he was active and efficient. Thoroughly Presbyterian in his be- 
liefs and methods, he yet respected the beliefs of others and in 
all the great varieties of Christian service he found a congenial 




c^~^$^^^iluj 



cr 



TOWN OF CAK.MEL. 315 

sphere for his great heart to lavish its sympathy and his busy 
brain to kindle its brightest thought. 

His death in the vigor of his years made vacancies to be long 
deplored. The religious history of Putnam county would be 
incomplete without giving large place to him whose name is 
tenderly cherished in so many of its homes. 

He married the eldest daughter of Benjamin W. Merriam of 
New York, who, with three daughters, survives him. 

Parsonage and Church Lots.— As stated before. Rev. Elna- 
than Gregory during his life was tenant of a large farm near 
his church. July 10th, 1818, Amos Belden sold to Enoch Cros- 
by, Joel Frost, Elisha Smith, David Travis and Joseph Crane, 
trustees of the church, thirty acres of land bounded south by 
Dean's Pond and north by the Horse Pound road. This farm 
the trustees sold to Rev. Benaiah Y. Morse, March 5th, 1835. 
He sold two thirds of an acre next the road to Floyd T. Frost 
and the remainder to William Watts April 7th of the same 
year. The house and part of the land opposite the burying 
ground now belong to Lyman Craft, the house being the old 
parsonage built before the Revolution. The present church in 
Carmel was built in 1836. The church lot was sold to the trus- 
tees by Lewis Ludington, James Raymond and Benjamin Bel- 
den, June 30th, 1835. This is apart of a tract of 16 acres which 
was sold to them by Elisha Cole July 7th, 1834. The north line 
of this church lot is the original north bounds of the farm leased 
in perpetuity by Philip Philipse to James Dickinson in 1766, 
and which afterward passed into the hands of Elisha Cole. The 
present parsonage was purchased from Chauncey R. Weeks in 
1856. 

The Gilead Burying Ground.— This place, situated about a 
mile southeast of the village of Carmel and the location of the old 
Gilead Church, is a part of the farm which, in 1756, was in pos- 
sesion of Thomas Crosby and was leased to James Dickinson 
in 1766 and sold to Elisha Cole by Frederick Philipse in 1828. 
It is probable that the first burials here were soon after the 
building of the Gilead Church. The oldest inscription is in 
memory of Sarah, wifeof Jesse Smith, who died November 17th, 
1766. This burial ground is the last resting place of the earliest 
settlers and the representatives of the older families of the town. 
The old Gilead meeting house stood on the west end of the 
ground and a little way north of the road. 



316 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

The following names and dates are from the Gilead Burying 
Ground.— James Colwell, died July 4, 1837, age 76; David Myr- 
rick, May 8, 1800, 69; Hannah, wife, Feb. 24, 1807, 77; Lois w'ife 
of Matthew Beale, July 1, 1785, 27; Elizabeth, widow of Tho. 
Crosby, Aug. 6, 1801, 92; Sarah, wife of George Beale, Jan. 1, 
1790, 37; Sarah, wife of Mr. Jesse Smith, Nov. 17, 1766, 62; 
Daniel Baily, May 24, 1861, 61; Caleb Fowler, Aug. 6, 1805, 72; 
Eliza wife, June 8, 1807, 80; John Wood, Dec. 17, 1808, 34; John 
Myrrick, May 14, 1812, 42; Rev. Ebenezer Phillips, Feb. 15, 
1834, 48; Mary, wife, Oct. 15, 1846, 46; Reuben Hopkins, July 
22, 1798, 31; Capt. Solomon Hopkins, Sept. 22, 1792, 54; Eliza- 
beth, wife, Jan. 6, 1804, 62; Eleanor, wife of Thatcher Hopkins, 
Mar. 2, 1786, 80; Col. Caleb Hazen, March 31, 1806, 56; Ruth, 
-wife, Dec. 18, 1828, 77; Capt. Eleazor Hazen, Sept. 20, 1793, 37; 
Enoch Crosby, June 26, 1835, 85; Sarah, wife, Sept. 4, 1811, 56; 
Joel Myer, Mar. 25, 1807, 72: Seth Foster, Sept. 15, 1837, 76; 
Huldah, wife, Oct. 29, 1797, 40; Elizabeth, wife, Jan. 28, 1848, 
86; Tho. Foster, Sept. 22, 1840, 45; Laura A. Foster, Nov. 30, 
1847, 43; Tilly Foster, Apr. 4, 1847, 49; Sally, wife, Apr. 8, 
1836, 40; Abigail, wife, James Sloat, May 15, 1825, 69; Eli Gan- 
nung, Feb. 8, 1827, 40; Reuben Gannung, Dec. 29, 1836, 79; 
Samuel Kniflfen, Oct. 9, 1791, 74; Alvah Trowbridge, June 10, 
1856, 76; Sally, wife, April 6, 1833, 52; James Garrison, Jan. 
18, 1881, 80; Zebulon Washburn, Nov. 17, 1833, 86; Jeremiah 
Hughson, Apr. 12, 1812, 63; Rebecca, wife, Apr. 7, 1812, 61; 
Abijah Baker, Oct. 1805, 80; Tho. Wilson, Oct. 7, 1805, 80; John 
Frost. Mar. 21, 1831, 91; Huldah, wife, Oct. 13, 1802, 60; Mehit- 
able Frost, June 6, 1856, 73; Wm. Colwell, Sept. 13, 1825, 81; 
Phebe, wife, Mar. 25, 1818, 80; Solomon Fowler, Oct. 21, 1828, 
61; Hannah, wife, July 1, 1849, 73; Jacob Gannng, Dec. 22, 
1834, 86; Hannah, wife. May 22, 1845, 92; Joseph Gannng, May 
24, 1836, 6S; Susannah, wife, Aug. 19, 1848, 69; Hon. Joel Frost, 
Sept. 11, 1827, 62; Martha, wife, Oct. 21, 1860, 88; Jonathan 
Fowler, Oct. 26, 1848, 79; Mary, wife, Apr. 16, 1835, 59; Philip 
Smith, Jan. 1, 1828, 73; Elizabeth, wife, Jan. 30, 1829, 69; Capt. 
Samuel Kniffen, Mar. 9, 1828, 77; Jane, wife, Feb. 21, 1844, 86; 
Susannah Fowler, Oct. 1, 1847, 80; Phebe Fowler, Sept. 28, 1847, 
88; Ampelias Yeomans, Feb. 22, 1853, 74; Abagail, wife, March 
10, 1848, 63; Salome, wife Josiah Baker, Dec. 26, 1845, 71 ; John 
Frost, May 11, 1862, 88; Cornelia, wife, Apr. 11, 1844, 62; William 
Seeley, Mar. 11, 1828, 53; Joel Murger, Mar. 25, 1807, 72; Lewis 



TO UN OF CA K.MEL. 317 

Crosby, April 30, 1S36, 40; Cornelia, wife, Dec. 3, 1S57, 64; 
Hannah Crosby, wife Philips Rundle, Apr. 16, 1871, 71; Gilbert 
Travis, Sept. 6, 1814, 74; Joseph Travis, Mar. 1, 1841, 75; Deb- 
orah, wife, June 12, 1845, 77; Amos Belden, May 4, 1830, 66; 
Elizabeth, wife, Dec. 27, 1851, 82; Jeremiah Hopkins, Oct. 17, 
1829, 67; Thankful, wife, Apr. 18, 1833, 70; Jonathan Travis, 
Feb. 1, 1845, 85; Elizabeth, wife, Feb. 28, 1840, 88; Richard 
Travis, Oct. 25, 1844, oG. 

James Raymond Avas born in Albany county, N. Y., March 
loth, 1795. His parents were originally from Southeast Town- 
ship, Putnam county, in which they were old settlers. He re- 
ceived a common school education, learned the harness-making 
trade, and opened a shop in Carmel village. About 1826 he en- 
gaged in the menagerie business in a small way, which busi- 
ness he gradually increased and extended until he was known 
as one of the foremost and successful showmen in the United 
States. He founded the firm of Raymond, Ogden & Co., sub- 
sequently changed to Raymond, Waring & Co. He was one of 
the founders of Raymond Seminary, now known as Drew Semi- 
nary. September 26th, 1818, he married Julia Smith, a native 
of Putnam county, now living at an advanced age, and the 
oldest living member of the Gilead Presbyterian Church. Car- 
mel. Mr. Raymond's death occurred March 23d, 1854, and he 
is buried in the cemetery at Carmel, which bears his name. 

He laid out the Raymond Cemetery in 1845, and the same 
year gave a deed of the land to the trustees of the Gilead 
Church, and it is now under their control. 

Mount Cakmel Baptist Church.— The family of Elisha 
Cole are supposed to have been the first Baptists settled here 
and his descendants have ever been identified with the church 
of that denomination. The society is supposed to have been 
organized about 1770, but for many years there was no 
meeting house in this vicinity. In the summer time meetings 
were held in the open air and Elder Elisha Cole preached to 
n ambers gathered from all the country round, while in winter 
the meetings were held in jDrivate houses. Sometime between 
1780 and 1785, a building was bought and moved to a place on 
the west side of the street in Carmel, where the house of the 
late Lewis Ballard now stands, next south of the horse sheds 
belonging to tlie church. Tliis was used till 1806, when a second 
church was built. This meeting house stood on the small lot 



318 HISTORY OF PUTXAM COUXTT. 

south of the present church and on land leased from Frederick 
Philipse. In the survey of Lot 6 in ISIO the first church is 
spoken of as having been " sold and converted into a barn." 

June 29th, 1821, Frederick Philipse gave to the trustees of the 
church "in consideration of his respect for the religious es- 
tablishment whose temporal concerns are under their care and 
supervision," the piece of land now owned by the church, 
lying on the west side of the road and including the old burying 
ground, and also the small lot south of the present church on 
which the second meeting house was then standing. 
The church was incorporated February 16th, 1807, the 
-trustees being Barnabas Carver, Joseph Cole and Henry 
Nichols, and " the Society then agreed that their house and 
society be called by the name of Mount Carmel." The third 
church was erected in 1836 on land bought of Eli Kelley, Kov- 
veraber 25th, 1835, and remained till 1869. 

The first preacher of this society was Elisha Cole, the first 
settler of the name, and he was succeeded by his son, Elder 
Nathan Cole, who was identified with the church during his 
entire life. His salary in 1791 was $12. About 1792 a division 
arose in the church and Elder Cole, with quite a number of the 
members, withdi'ew because the church neglected to support 
their poor. In 1794 the matter was referred to a council which 
censured the church for not maintaining their indigent mem- 
bers and counseled the disaffected members to unite in love 
and labor together for the good of Zion. This advice was com- 
plied with and the church again acted in unity. In 1795 
Brother Joseph Arnold was licensed to preach. In 1796 a rup- 
ture again occurred and Elder Cole with a large number with- 
drew from the church on account of the " superfluous dress, 
and the holding of posts of civil and military office in earthly 
states by certain members." Notwithstanding this the church 
increased, and it was "Resolved that our dissenting brethren 
who withdrew from the church on account of fashionable dress 
and the holding of i30sts of honor both civil and military be 
allowed the privilege of occupying the meeting house one half 
the time." 

Thus matters continued, both the church and the disaffected 
mem1)ers receiving members until July 1st, 1797. when the 
church withdrew the hand of fellowship from all dissenting 
brethren and sisters for covenant breaking. November 22d'^ 



TOWN OF CARJtEL. 319 

1798, Daniel Cole was ordained deacon and during 1799 and 1S02 
the church was supplied with preaching by Elder Ebenezer Cole 
and Jonathan Sturdevant at the stipulated rate of SS5 a year. 
A list was taken of members willing to contribute to the sup- 
port of the gospel and for a part of the time meetings were held 
in private houses " to accommodate the lame, the halt and the 
blind." In December, 1802, some of the members were put 
under admonition for joining the Masons. Elder Ebenezer Cole 
became sole pastor in 1802 at a salary of $30. In 1809 Lewis 
Evans was licensed to preach and Elisha Booth in the year fol- 
lowing. 

About this time the church met with a severe loss by the 
death of Elder Cole, whose tombstone in the old burying ground 
bears the following: 

" IN MEMORY OF ELDER NATHAN COLE WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE FEB. 6, 1805, IN 
THE 59th YEAR OF HIS AGE. 

" A dying preacher I have been 
Christ and his cross has been my theme. 
Laboring for souls for thirty years 
Often warning tliem with tears. 
\ Today ye come my grave to view 

In silence now I speak to you 
Your fleeting time rolls fast away, 
Prepare to meet thy God to-day." 

Elder Ebenezer Cole died August 18th, 1815, at the age of 61, 
and Deacon Daniel Cole December 10th, 1831, aged 8o. These 
three brothers, the pillars of the early Baptist church, together 
await the resurrection. 

Elder Daniel Wildnian came in 1817-and a great revival took 
place in 1818, and many were added to the church. 

July 9th, 1820, Elder John Warren preached his first sermon 
in this church and this was the beginning of a pastorate of 
twenty- one years, during which time he baptized between three 
and four hundred. His father was a soldier in the Revolution 
and a prisoner on board the prison ship in New York, from 
which he escaped and came to Carrael. He was licensed to 
preach June 2oth, 1791. and was afterward ordained at Dan- 
bury, Conn. 

Elder John Warren was born in Carmel but in early life went 
with his father's family to Worcester, Otsego county, K. Y. 
He began to preach in 1811 and was pastor at Roxbury, N. Y. 
In 1818 he came to Patterson in this county. Hismiuistrv alter- 



320 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

nated between the latter place and Carmel, where he was pastor 
for twenty years, closing his labors in 1842. After a long life 
of usefulness and devotion to his labor, Elder AVarren died at 
Danbury, Conn., July 21st, 1868, aged 83 years, one month and 
two days. He was buried in an obscure part of the old burying 
ground in Carmel, but in June, 1871, his remains were removed 
to a more fitting place in front of the present church, and a 




BAPTIST CHURCH, C.UIMEL VILLAGE. 



neat monument was erected by his relatives and friends. The 
Baptist church had no truer representative and there was no 
firmer defender of the "Faith once delivered to the Saints" 
than Elder John "Warren. 

The strictness of discipline in early days appears in many 
instances. A resolution of May 17th, 1828, states, "That it 
should be considered a church discipline that a member of the 



TOWX OF CARMEL. . 321 

church should visit a Free Mason Lodge," and in 1829 a com- 
plaint was raised against one of the members " for walking 
uncharitably in playinrj the violin, to the grief of the brethren 
and sisters, and he was put under admonitions therefor." 

The next pastor was Rev. C. H. Underhill who entered upon 
his labors March 1st, 1842. He remained till April 1st, and 
was sncceeded by Kev. Aaron Perkins. The succeeding pastors 
were: Rev. J. M. Coley, August, 2, 1846, to April 1st, 1849; C, B. 
Keyes, June 1st. 1849, to April 1st, 1851; John Seage, April 1st, 
1851-53; D. T. Hill, April 1st, 1853-58: William S. Clapp, 1859 
to November, 1859; A. Perkins, January 1st, 1860, to May 1st; ' 
William S. Clapp, May 1st, 1860, to October. 1865; Otis Saxton' 
October 1st, 1865, to April 1st, 1866. 

• In 1867 Rev. William S. Clapp again took charge of the 
church and has remained its pastor till the present time. 
■ The present church was built in 1869 and dedicated March 
10th, 1870. The old church was sold to Leonard Yeamans for 
8405. The pulpit and seats were used for the present Baptist 
church at Boyd's Reservoir. 

The nevr church which was built at a cost of 833,000, will seat 
600 persons and is an elegant and imposing edifice. 

Rev. William S. Clapp, who has for many years been the 
pastor of Carmel Baptist Church, was born at Ballston, Sara- 
toga county, N. Y., November 2d, 1822. His parents, Chester 
and Eleanor Stilwell Clapp, are yet residents of Ballston, the 
former at the advanced age of ninety-three, and the latter aged 
eighty-eight. - 

They were the parents of six children: Marcella, wife of Dr. 
C. T. Harris, of Syracuse; Russell P., William S., Edward L., 
John A., and Harmon W. The last two are deceased; the 
former of whom was one of the earliest emigrants to California 
in 1849, the latter was killed during the Civil War. 

The early life of Mr. Clapp was passed in his native place 
under the care of his parents, and on reaching the age of 
seventeen, he left home to attend school at Stillwater Academy. 
After completing his preparatory studies, he entered Madison 
University in the Sophomore year, and graduated in July, 1846. 
Previous to his graduation Mr. Clapp accepted an invitation to 
become pastor of the First Baptist Church in Albany, and was 
ordained March 10th, 1846. In this charge he remained rill 
May, 1849, when a call was extended from a Baptist Church in 



322 HISTORY OF PCJTXAM COUNTY. 

New York city which was accepted. Here he remained three 
years, when his health, which had been shattered by an attack 
of cholera, compelled him to relinquish his charge. 

Mr. Clapp then removed to Danbury, Conn., where he became 
pastor of the church, and remained there till 1S57. In Febru- 
ary, 1868, he commenced a pastorate in the village of Carmel, 
which has continued to the present time, to the mutual satisfac- 
tion of pastor and people. 

Daring this lengthy service of twenty-eight years, an entire 
generation has grown up under his care, and been blessed by 
his example and instructions. 

Throughout the county his influence among the churches of 
the Baptist denomination is widely known and fully recognized, 
and in the councils of the various pastors, his advice and opin- 
ions are received with the respect which is most justly deserved. 
In 1864 Mr. Clapp went to Europe where he remained fifteen 
months, during which time he made extensive journeys through- 
out the continent. 

His influence and well merited popularity among all classes 
of people, led to his receiving, in 1872, the nomination for mem- 
ber of Legislature on an independent ticket, and the nomina- 
tion was confirmed by the people by a very large majority. 

Upon taking his seat in the Legislature, Mr. Clapp was ap- 
pointed upon the committees on Education, Charitable and Re- 
ligious Bodies, and Exj^enditures. 

One of the most important services in which Mr. Clapp was 
engaged, was conducting the memorial services held in honor of 
the memory of Hon. William H. Seward, who had passed to 
his rest after a life devoted to the best interests of his country. 
With the slight interruptions occasioned by his travels and 
legislative service, Mr. Clapp has been the settled pastor of 
the church of Carmel for a longer period than any of his 
predecessors; a service which we trust will long continue, and 
be in the future, as it has been in the past, blessed with re- 
sults for good. 

He married Miss Jane Maria Mesick of Albany, May 18th, 
1846. 

The surviving cliildren of this marriage are Chester S. and 
Susie M., wife of Dr. R. S. Moore of New York. 
After the decease of Mrs. Clapp at Danbury, November 12th, 




y /C^L^- /^/-^^^^^^^^ y^ 






7/ 



/ 



'A 



TOWX OF CARMEL. 323 

ISoo, he married Mrs. Catharine D. Kelley, daughter of Daniel 
Drew, June 11th, 1857. 

They had one son, Hon. Henry D. Clapp of Carmel. 

As a natural result of his long pastorate Mr. Clapp has become 
fully identified with the social and religious life of the town 
and county. In many families he has officiated at the baptism, 
marriage and funerals of their members, and shared with them 
in sympathy the joys and sorrows of their lives. The literary 
taste of the community has been greatly advanced by a large 
and well selected library of the choicest literature, a very 
large portion of which has been donated by Mr. Clapp and his 
son, and its elevating influence has not failed to be felt. 

Mr. Clapp was one of the directors of the New York, Boston 
& Montreal Railroad, now the New York and Northern, at the 
time of its building, and represented the interests of the town 
in that enterprise, a position which required no small degree 
of business capacity. 

From his long continued ministry, ripe scholarship, sound 
judgment and ability, Mr. Clapp is justly placed at the head 
of the Baptist denomination in the county, and the "Faith 
once delivered to the Saints" finds in him an able exponent 
and a valiant chamj^ion. 

Dates from the old burying ground, Carmel: — Hozea Town- 
send, died June 24, 1833, age 48: Ivah, wife, April 10, 1838, 49; 
James Hughson, Dec. 22, 1834, 55; Abigail, wife, March S, 1848, 
59; Christina Roberts, April 24, 1848, 86; Dea. Daniel Cole, Dec. 

10, 1831, 85; Susannah, wife, Nov. 3,1857, 102, 4m.8d.; Joseph 
Hopkins, Jan. 31, 1833, 81; Elizabeth, wife, Dec. 16, 1837, 82; 
Gen. James Townsend, Mar. 13, 1832, 76; Priscilla, wife, June 

11, 1839, 83; Elder Eben. Cole, Aug. 18, 1815, 61; Mary, wife, 
Aug. 30,1806, 44; NathajiJ2TOsby,iMJLJ^S,J72; JEkinice^wi^^ 

^Jan;_17^_1821^73; Tracy Ballard", Jan. 1, 1829, 72; Mercy, wife, 
IPebTs, 1820, 69; James Mead, April 5, 1830, 58; Lewis Robin- 
son, killed by lightning, May 27, 1810, 53; Mary, wife. May 8, 
1S3S, 81; David "Frost, Jan. 8, 1818, 51: Lydia, wife, Dec. 11, 
1816, 47; Nathan Fuller, Dec. 12, 1811, 44: Joseph Tillot, April 
24, 1818, 52; Elijah Fuller, June 9, 1821. 77; Martha, wife. May 
14, 1818, 76; John Kelley, jr., June 27, 1818, 54; Rachel, widow 
of John Kelley, jr., and widow of Epenetus Yeomans. Mar. 4, 
1850, 72: John Griffin. Jnlv 3. 1S42, 69; Mary, wife. Feb. 12, 



324 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

1859. 88; Doct. Robert Weeks, May 14, 1816, 44; Berry Cole, 
May 29, 1835, 66; Hannah, wife, Dec. 23, 1824, 47; John North- 
rap' Aug. 30, 1829, 57; Judah Kelley, Sept. 17, 1837, SO; Lydia, 
wife, May 28, 1818, 58: Polly, wife of Joseph Northrup, Jan. 9, 
1835, 93; David Dean, April 24, 1860, 92; Deborah, wife. May 
22, 1827, 58; Abraham Mabie, Aug. 7, 1817, 90; Sarah, wife, 
Aug. 12, 1816, 87; Abraham Hill, May 11, 1817, 70; Hannah, 
wife, July 5, 1SL8, 70; Gilbert Merritfc, March 4, 1821, 70; Charles 
Agor, Dec. 7, 1819, 95; Cornelius Organs, Dec. 3, 1818, 52; 
Eachel, wife, Sept. 18, 1836, 73; David. Frost, April 8, 1847, 82. 
From burying. ground by Baptist Church, Carmel: — Epenetus 
Yeomans, died Aug. 19, 1850, age 75; Ebenezer Oay, Feb. 19, 
1868, 79; James Kniffen, Jan. 3, 1853, 73;-Uriah Townsend, Feb. 
1, 1864, 80; Sally, Mfe, Sept.. 14, 1843, 57; Abijah' Townsend, 
Nov. 5, 1838, 78; Samuel Wilson, ; Jan. .16, 1844; ' 87; Daniel 
Brown, March 6, 1813, 43; Phebe, wife, Feb.- 2,- 1848, 83; David 
Merrick, Nov. 22, 1863, 95; Enoch Crosby, SeptM,il862, SO; Jane, 
wife, Nov. 10, 1867, -83; Wm. Ray inond,- April 18, 1833,57; 
Hannah, wife, Jan. 9,- 1841, 66. ...'.,• ' ■ 

The Methodist. Episcopal Chu,rch of Carmel'.— In 1788 
Freeborn Garrettson .'and his : assistant preachers introduced 
Methodism up the Hudson River region, and it very rapidly 
spread out in all directions. The preachers found many houses 
open to them and as early as 1789, Lieutenant Governor Yan 
Cortlandt, near Croton River, became the ardent friend of the 
Methodist preachers, and in honor of him, the. early field of 
work throughout this region was, for more than sixty years, 
known as the Cortlandt circuit. 

For many years the worship was conducted in private houses, 
and later in the Court House. The Methodist Episcopal Society 
of Carmel was incorporated July 15th, 1834, with the Rev. 
David Holmes, as pastor of the circuit, and for trustees the fol- 
io wino-, viz.: Harry Hanford, Ezra Bronson, Harvey Lounsbury, 
David Kelley and William .Barnes. An eligible building lot 
was deeded to the society August 29th, 1834, by Allen Newman 
and Amos W. Brown, it being the southern portion of the 
property on which the church now stands. The lirst church 
edifice was built the same year. It was a wooden structure and 
plain in style, but it taxed the resources of the slender society 
and left them with an encumbrance. 

'This sketch was furnished by Rev. J. W. A. Dodge. 



TOWN OF CAR.MEL. 



325 



The first Sunday school connected with this church was or- 
ganized in lSr)2. 

This first edifice was quite largely repaired and improved, 
and was re-dedicated in February, 1853. 

In 1862 Carmel was made a separate station, with the chapel 
at Drewville connected with it. A house and lot just north of 
the church were purchased of Ambrose Ryder for a parsonage, 
and Rev. Thomas B. Smith was appointed pastor. The next 
year a subscription was started for a new church and about 
$10,000 secured. In April, 1864, Rev. D. L. Marks succeeded 
to the pastorate and the project of building moved on; the par- 




METHODIST CHURCH, CARMEL VILLACiE. 



sonage lot was taken to enlarge the church lot and the present 
parsonage and lot were bought of Hannah Rundle; the old church 
was removed and is now occupied in part by the Putnam County 
National Bank. The contract for the present stone church was 
let to Caleb Wright and work was begun in the summer of 1S64; 
the contract called for a church edifice 43i by 70 feet, with spire 
100 feet high, and the chapel 30 by 40 feet, with 17 feet ceiling. 
The chaj^el was completed and opened for worship January 
1st, 1S65. The church was dedicated on October 10th, 1865, free 
of debt, by Bishop Simpson. The seats are free. 



326 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

The church property, organ, bell, parsonage and furnishing 
cost nearly $40,000, of which Daniel Drew contributed a large 
portion, and the stone tablet over the door still bears the name, 
"Daniel Drew M. E.. Church." 

The elegant pipe organ now in the church was the gift of D. 
D. Chamberlain and cost $3,500. Mr. W. F. Jewell has been 
for some years the organist and Prof. S. 0. Spencer the 
precentor. 

The church property, including site, buildings, parsonage, 
etc., is one of the most beautiful in the country. The member- 
ship is a little over one hundred, with about half that number 
in the Sunday school. 

The presence of the " Drew Ladies' Seminary," another of 
Daniel Drew's benefactions, has been quite a help to the Sab- 
bath congregations, and the faculty of the seminary have been 
most faithful supporters of the church in her varied interests, 
especially Profs. George Crosby Smith and Stephen Olin 
Spencer. 



CHAPTER XX. 

TOWN OF CARMEL (Continued.) 

Lake Mahopac— Hotels and Boarding Houses.— Lake Mahopac Improvement 
Company.— Mahopac Land Company.— Putnam Land Company.— Tlie Islands 
of Lake Mahopac— Lake Mahopac Methodist Church.— Protestant Episcopal 
Church.— Roman Catholic Church.— Union Valley Cemetery and Chapel.— 
Mount Hope Methodist Chapel.-Red Mills.— Mahopac Iron Ore Company.— 
Red Mills Baptist Church.- Red Mills Presbyterian Church.— Rev. Hams 
Rogers Schenck.— Putnam County Seminary Association.— Western Part of 
Carmel.— Supervisors. 



L 



AKE MAHOPAC, the pride of Putnam county, has been 
. ^ associated in modern times with all that is beautiful and 
romantic in rural scenery, all that is gay and extravagant in 
fashionable life, and with the most reckless of land speculations. 
This beautiful sheet of water, covering an area of 603 acres, and 
elevated 6.06 feet above the level of the sea, is one of the greatest 
attractions of the country. Tn early times it was generally 
known simplv as the "Big pond," but on Erskine's military map 
it is noted as' " Mahopac Pond," the Indum name which is thus 
perpetuated being probably the equivalent of "Great Lake,^' 
a name which, in comparison with the others in the county, it 
justly deserves. It was also known as "Hughson's pond" 
from Robert Hughson, who lived on the north side of the lake 
at the time of the Revolution. 

After the confiscation of the property of Roger Morns and 
his wife, the land around the lake was sold in large farms. A 
larse tract of 314 acres, which included the land on the north- 
west side of the lake, and extended west to Kirk Lake and in- 
cluded its outlet, and also the famous "Red Mills," and the 
large island, was sold to William Smith. The land lying at 
the' southwest corner of Lake Mahopac and on the north side of 
the outlet was sold to John Le Clare. This embraced 89 aci'es 



328 HISTORY OF PUT.VAM COUNTY. 

OQ the south side of this outlet, and extending for some dis- 
tance along the south side of the lake was a farm of 132 acres 
sold to Abigail Clark. The "Dean House " stands on this tract. 
Next to the above farm, extending along the lake to a point 
east of Ganung's Island, was the farm of Joseph Gregory, 
which included 130 acres. Next to this, including the lake 
shore to a point above the "Thompson House," was the farm 
of John Drake, which extended far to the east and embraced 262 
acres. Next north of this was a farm sold to Peter Mabie. This 
was a tract of lOo acres and began on the lake shore at a point 
nearly west from the Methodist church, and ran east to the 
brook which is the outlet of the Mud Pond, then down the 
same for some distance, and then extended east to the original 
east line pi Lot 5 of Philipse Patent, then south along this line 
.six chains, and then westerly to the lake. It included nearly 
all the shore of the lake between the Methodist church and a 
point a short distance south of the Carpenter House. 

Previous to the Revolution one "Dr. Hamilton" is marked 
on Erskine's military map as living at the south end of the 
point'of land that projects into the lake and forms so important 
a portion of its contour. 

The original farms thus sold by the commissioners of for- 
ieiture, were soon transferred to other parties, and were after- 
ward divided among many owners. Fifty-two acres of land at 
■the northeast corner of the Joseph Gregory farm were sold to 
Abel Smith, April 24th, 1801, by Solomon Kirkham and wife 
Hannah; This tract lay directly opposite what is known as 
"Ganungs Island" and Abel, Smith had his house on it. 
March 15th, 1794, Abel Smith bought of Paul Secord a small 
tract "Beginniugat the northwest corner of land now or late 
belonging to the widow of Samuel Crane, then along the same 
• southerly to the highway, then west by the highway to an old 
coal kiln near a place called the Indian Cove; from thence north 
to a large pond, and then by said pond to the place of begin- 
ning, be the same more or less." This last tract is now owned by 
.Stephen Smith. It is probable tliat what is now known as 
" Hoguet's Point " was originally a part of the Drake farm, 
and it was bought by Abel Smith at the beginning of the present 
century. After his death it fell to his son, Ahijah Smith, who 
sold it to Antliony Hoguet September 15th, 1854, who owned it 
till the time of his death, January 2d, 1875, and it has ever since 



TOWX OF CARMEL. 329 

borne his name. It was surveyed and divided into lots, and an 
elegant map liled in the office of the county clerk, but the dream 
of its purchaser, to see it the site of beautiful villas, was never 
realized. To the west of Ganungs Island is a lot of two acres 
which was sold by Ahijah Smith to Peter D. Christie, Sep- 
tember 20th, 1859, and left by him in his wilh to Marion De 
Lavarre, a lady of somewhat romantic history. Upon this she 
built a beautiful cottage, which is one of the ornaments of the 
place. She sold the premises to Lewis H. Gregory and Thad- 
deus R. Ganung in 1870; the latter transferred his share to Mr. 
Gregory and it was sold by mortgage sale to Mr. Thaddeus R. 
Ganung, its present owner. 

Up to 1S34, the lake was scarcely known to the outside world 
world, except by the reports of a few tourists who had seen its 
romantic beauty. In that year Stephen Monk, a native of Con- 
necticut, purchased from Stephen Thompson one acre of land 
adjoining the lake; this acre was a part of the Peter Mabiefarm 
and was given by Mr. Mabie to his son-in-law, Edward Termil- 
yea. He sold it to William Wright, who conveyed it to 
Stephen Thompson in 1822, and it was purchased from him' bj- 
Stephen Monk, December 26th, 1834; this lot lies on the south 
side of the road leading from the railroad station to the lake 
and is the same site on which the famous Gregory House after- 
ward stood. Here Mr. Monk erected the first hotel and board- 
ing house at Lake Mahopac. The house stood at the corner of 
the lot and close to the road which runs south along the lake. 
His hotel soon became the resort of tourists, and he had a 
liberal amount of patronage, although the only means of ac- 
cess was by stages from Peekskill. 

Mr. Monk, though a popular landlord, did not become wealtliy 
here. Business troubles soon began toiinnoyhim and in the 
newspaper of that day there appeared the following advertise- 
ment, the forerunner of many similar ones in after times: 

" For Sale. — Valuable real estate. Will be sold on the 1st 
day of October next at 10 o'clock A. M., at auction at the resi- 
dence of S. Monk, that well known and popular resort, the 
MahojDac Hotel in the town of Carmel, together with about 
one acre of land on which the said Hotel is situated. The 
undersigned consider tliat this property is so well known and 
highly appi'eciated it is unnecessary to give a further descrip- 
tion here. 



330 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

" About 20 acres of excellent woodland at the head of the 
lake and five acres in the vicinity of the premises first men- 
tioned will be sold at the same time. 

" September 14. 1882. '" 

At the above sale the hotel and the acre of land on which it 
stood were sold to Charles W. Schaflfer and George W. Shields 
for $3,560. The premises were conveyed by them to Huldah 
Gregory in September, 1844. The piece of land lying directly 
opposite the west end of the road which runs to the railroad 
station, and which was bounded on the west by the lake, was a 
part of the old Mabie farm, which was purchased by Daniel 
Baldwin. This piece, containing about an acre with a dwelling 
house, was sold to William Nelson by the administrators of 
Daniel Baldwin in September, 1842, and he transferred it to 
Huldah Gregory, and both pieces, with the buildings, were 
conveyed by her to her son. Dr. Lewis H. Gregory, January 
26th, 1853. Notwithstanding these various sales Stephen Monk 
continued to conduct the hotel, holding the premises as a ten- 
ant and making the owners some trouble to get possession. He 
died March 15th, 1859, and the following characteristic notice 
appeared in the newspapers of that day. 

'•Death of Stephen l/o/zA-.— This somewhat remarkable habi- 
tue of Carmel, died in New York city on Tuesday the 15th inst. 
Mr. Monk was born in Massachusetts in 1803. Many members 
of his family still reside in that State and hold a position in 
the highest circles of society. Mr. Monk, or " Old Bolivar," 
as he was familiarly styled, came to Putnam county in the 
fall of 1826, and a short time after commenced the boot and 
shoe business at Lake Mahopac. Prior to this period, he had 
been leader of the band in several of the principal travelling 
exhibitions of the country. 

'• He was married in the autum of 1829 to Miss Clorinda Crane, 
daughter of John Crane, jr., and sister of the late Elijah Crane. 
Shortly after his marriage, he started a hotel at Lake Mahopac, 
and may be regarded as the father of that beautiful summer 
resort. Most of the town business was transacted at his house, 
and "Old Bolivar" was instrumental in bringing about many 
important improvements, and, indeed deserves the credit of 
establishinu- the Lake in the hearts of the pleasure seekers and 



TOWN OF CAKMEL. 331 

tourists of the metropolis. He kept the principal Hotel at 
Mahopac until the year 1854, when circumstances with which 
the public are familiar, induced him to relinquish the pro- 
l^rietorship. 

"He was fifty-six years old whan he died, and leaves a wife 
and seven children. He had been sick about five weeks. He 
was a man of much versatile talent, and some genius. At one 
period of his life he was considered the first clarionette player 
in the United States. He was entirely a self-taught man; and 
his mechanical dexterity in some respects was marvellous. Poor 
Bolivar! We remember well when he came to us with tears in 
his eyes, and related in his slow, broken accents the loss of his 
favorite violin at the burning of the Crystal Palace;— a genuine 
Cremona, a century and a half old, which he valued as priceless, 
and for which he had refused a thousand dollars. His face had 
been singularly handsome in his youth, and in his somewhat 
premature age retained many traces of its former beauty. He 
had a large heart, and no man ever went from his door hungry; 
and when at last he had no settled home, his heart and purse 
were always open for the destitute. Had he been less liberal 
he might have left a richer legacy to his heirs. Everybody 
liked him, and all will regret his decease. His remains were in- 
terred in the Crane burying ground." 

From the time of his purchase till the day of his death Dr. 
Lewis H. Gregory was identified with the progress of the hotel 
business at Lake Mahopac. In addition to the original hotel 
built by Monk, he enlarged the dwelling which stood nearly op- 
posite, and it was generally known as the Mansion House. This 
building took fire and was destroyed January ISth, 1857, being 
the first boarding house burned at the lake. Dr. Gregory en- 
larged his premises by the purchase of seventeen acres on the 
south, from the heirs of Ebenezer Horton, and a smaller piece 
from Pierre Humbert. The old Monk house was moved to it 
and a large boarding house was erected in its place and was the 
most extensive building of the kind in the neighborhood, and 
known as the Gregory House. 

All of the original Mabie farm, with the exception of the acre 
which came into the possession of Stephen Monk, was sold by 
the heirs of Peter Mabie to Daniel Baldwin and to Sutton and 
Samuel Vail. The latter sold their part to Mr. Baldwin, who 
by other purchases became one of the largest land owners 



332 HISTORY OF PUT'STAM COUNTT. 

around the lake, and some of the property still remains in the 
hands of his descendants. In the spring of 1853 Reuben D. 
Baldwin built a large boarding house on the north side of the 
road and oi:)posite the Gregory House; this was blown down 
while in process of erection by a furious gale which occurred 
March 25th. In 1S5S John W. Carpenter came to this place and 
built the house which bears his name, and it was conducted by 
him as a lirst-class boarding house till 1868 when it was sold to 
Alvah Hyatt, but soon came back to its former owner. 

About 1849 the Harlem Railroad was completed as far as 
Croton Falls. The tide of travel, which up to that time had been 
from Peekskill, turned at once to the former place. During 
the height of the boarding season there was a constant travel 
up the highway leading from Croton Falls to the lake, and by 
an act of Legislature in 1859, commissioners were employed to 
straighten and improve this road and under their management 
it became one of the best highways in the county', and on the 
arrival of trains on the Harlem Road, coaches belonging to the 
various boarding houses, drawn by four, six and even ten horse 
teams, urged on by drivers who strived to emulate Jehu of old, 
made remarkably quick time in reaching their destination. 

Among the well known citizens of the place in the days before 
boarders and boarding houses were thought of, was Stephen 
Thompson, who came from Connecticut and set up the business 
of hat making at the lake. Nathan L. Thompson, his son, also 
came from Connecticut and bought a lot of four or five acres by 
the lake'. Here he established the business of hat making which 
he continued for many years. The following advertisement ap- 
pears in the local paper: 

" Nathan L. Thompson has opened a Shop on the south shore 
of the celebrated Lake Mahopac where he offers for sale ready 
made hats of his own manufacturing, cheap for cash. 

"Wanted. — The subscriber wants an apprentice to the HAT 
making business; a lad of 16 or 17 years of age, of steady habits, 
and one who can come well recommended, enquire of 

"N. L. THO.\tPSO>'. 
"Lake Mahopac, Sept. 9th, 1846.'' 

' The old road ran a short distance north of the present one for some distance, 
and near the lionse of Judge Edward Wright. 

■Tlie Th(jmpson House stands on the original Drake farm. This part of it was 
owned in the early part of this century by Elias Mabie and afterward by Henry 
S. Baldwin, wlu) sold to Thompson. 



TOWN OF CARMJiL. 333 

About ISol Mr. Thompson began to entertain boarders, com- 
mencing in a small way and gradually enlarging his accommo- 
dations till he could entertain three hundred guests. This hotel 
was burned July 6th, 1869, and was at once rebuilt on a much 
larger scale and it is safe to say that the Thompson House 
has been the most permanently profitable of any of its kind. 

October 5th, 1869, the Baldwin House, which stood north of 
the Gregory House, was burned, and it has never been rebuilt. 
The curiously shaped building now on the premises, which 
attracts the attention of travellers, was originally the carriage 
house and barn of the hotel. The loss by this tire is said to 
have been 850,000, and the lot was sold to several persons by the 
assignees of Eeuben D. Baldwin. 

South of the Carpenter House is the " Kaufman Place." This 
was a farm of 99 acres which had once been a portion of 
the original Drake farm and had been purchased by Daniel 
Baldwin. In 1867 it was sold by Henry S. Baldwin to Samuel 
Kaufman for 830,000. At that time there was a comfortable 
farm house on the premises, which was the Baldwin homestead. 
Kaufman is said to have expended $150,000 on the place. • It was 
the oft repeated story of heavy mortgages with the usual result, 
and it is now. held by the Nevada Bank. 

The old Hnghson farm at the north end of the lake remained 
in a state of primeval simplicity till a comparatively recent date. 
It was sold by the Hughson family to Stephen Dingee and by 
him to Benjamin Ballard, whose heirs conveyed it to his brother, 
Selah Ballard, and it was sold by him to Lewis B. Griffin', March 

'Lewis B. Griffin came from New York where lie had made a comfortable for- 
tune by building docks. He died about 1860, leaving no children. Near the 
middle of this farm is a small bur_ving ground where rest some of the early set- 
tlers of this neighborliood. The following dates are from tombsto'i^es: 

Mr. Samuel Wixom, died April 11th, 1803. Age, 64. '' 
Benjamin Griffin, born 1747, died May 26, 182.5 " • - 



Phebe, wife of Benj 
■ ■ John Griffin 
Michael Sloat 
Elisha Baldwin 
Elizabetli, wife of 


, Griffin, " Dec. 11. 1849 " 92. 
" April 16, 18.55 '■ 67. 
" Aug. 4, 1815 '• ,58. 
" Oct. 19, 1816 " 65. 
" June 3. 1831 " 70. 




Ja'xy 24 
J.B. 

DIKD AGED 70 
1780. 


(Tills last inscription is supposei 
cestor ot the Baldwin family). 


I to mark the grave of James Bale 


JIary. wife of Shubael 'Wixoni, 2d Feb. G, 1801. age 31. 


Elijah Wright, November 11, 1827 '• 4.-,. 



334 HISTORY OF PfJTlSrAM COUNTY. 

27th, 1841, for §12,500. It remained in his possession till the 
time of his death, with the exception of two small pieces, one 
of 24 acres, which was sold by him August 12th, 1S56, to Wil- 
liam Tilden, and another of 11 acres, sold in 1855 to Elias H. 
Herrick. 

After the death of Mr. Griffin the remainder of the farm, 
with some additional land, was sold under a partition suit by 
Odle Close, Referee, to Isabel Saportas, wife of Edward 
Saportas, July 1st, 1863. The extreme south end of the Hugh- 
son farm on the east side of the lake was bought by John Crane, 
who owned a large farm to the east of this. The part bought 
by him included the land where the Lake House now stands 
and some distance to the north and east. John Crane gave this 
with a large farm besides to his son, Nathaniel Crane, Sep- 
tember 2d. 1826. Nathaniel Crane sold the lot where the 
Methodist church now stands to the trustees of the church. The 
small white house standing on the east side of the road, nearly 
opposite the east end of the boulevard was built by Nathaniel 
Crane, for his son-in-law. Amnion Fowler, but was sold by him 
to Lewis B. Griffin, together with 80 acres of land adjoining. 
May 3d, 1846, and lie sold the house with the land around it to 
Elias H. Herrick and it now belongs to his widow. 

Shortly after his purchase, William Tilden erected the elegant 
stone mansion which stands on the jiorth shore overlooking 
the lake, and it is still in possession of his family. On the 
southwest corner of the lake, at the outlet, was the original 
Abigail Clark farm. A large part of this was afterward owned 
by Devoe Bailey, who by various purchases became one of the 
largest land owners in the county, his lands extending from 
the lake to the Westchester line This tract he left to his son, 
William, who sold it to James Seeley, and in 1852 it was sold to 
Amzi L. Dean. Upon it he built a boarding house, beginning 
on a small scale, and gradually enlarging till it became an ex- 
tensive business, which has descended to his sons. 

The "Summit House," a hotel built about 1856 by Amzi 
Slawson, on the south side of the road, about sixty rods west 
of the Dean House, was burned January 1st, 1865, and never 
rebuilt. 

When the various boarding houses around the lake were 
filled to their full capacity the place presented an appearance 
of gaiety and fashionable life equal to any of the famous Avater- 



TOWN OF CARMEL. 335 

ing places of the country, and Lake Mahopac was mentioned in 
the same category with Newport and Saratoga. 

In the spring of 1871 the prospect of extending the New 
York City & Northern Eailroad to Carmel seemed favorable, 
and to get in advance of this enterprise the Harlem Railroad 
Company planned a road from Golden' s Bridge to Lake Ma- 
hopac. Articles of incorporation were speedily executed for 
the " New York and Mahopac Railroad " and the work of sur- 
vey and building began at once, and was so rapidly carried on 
that the first train ran through to the lake on July 4th, 1871. 
Upon this occasion there was a grand celebration, and Lake 
Mahopac was in the height of its glory. 

About this time was organized a company whose career is a 
very important chapter in the history of this section of country. 
The "Lake Mahopac Improvement Company" was incorporated 
March 8th, 1871, its object being "The erection of buildings 
and laying out and subdivisions of lands with building lots or 
villa plots at Lake Mahopac." 

The capital stock of the company was $1,000,000 and the 
trustees were Joseph Seligman, Demas Barnes, Henry Knicker- 
bocker, Uranus H. Crosby, Alfred B. Darling, William Moller, 
Andrew McKenney and John H. Cheever. The company pur- 
chased several tracts of land, paying for them extravagant 
sums, making partial payments and giving mortgages as se- 
curity for the remainder. 

A very prominent character in this enterprise was Uranus H. 
Crosby, who obtained some property and more celebrity by 
drawing the opera house in Chicago in a lottery. He bought 
many pieces of land here and sold them at a large advance to 
the Improvement Company. 

The Gregory House, which stood near the site of Stephen 
Monk's Hotel, and was built by Dr. Lewis H. Gregory, was sold 
by him to Andrew McKenney in April, 1871. In part i^ayment 
he took a farm in Connecticut where he made his home for a 
short time. McKenney transferred the property to the Mahopac 
Improvement Company the same year. The premises, being 
heavily mortgaged, were sold by John G. Miller, referee, to Dr. 
Gregory, in May, 1875, and he again took charge of the hotel 
which had not been very prosperous during the iiiterval. The 
incumbrances on the estate were such that on Ai:)ril 26th, 1877, 
it was again sold by Walter Edwards, referee, to Edwin A. 



336 IIISTOKY OF PUTNAM COUXTY. 

McAlpine, who took possession. On the 2d of October. 1S7S, 
occnrred an event which will be long remembered, and which 
was thus described in a local newspaper. 

'•The well known Gregory House, at Lake Mahopac, was en- 
tirely consumed by fire on Tuesday morning last. It had been 
closed for the season, and at the time of the fire was occupied 
by Mr. Perry and his family only. On Monday Mr. Gregory 
had removed his horses and wagons, and his live stock, to his 
place in Connecticut, and was there when the fire occurred. It 
commenced at the north end, and in a very short time the im- 
mense structure was reduced to ashes, together with its furni- 
ture. Mr. Perry, who has been connected with the house the 
present season, occupied the southern end and the most of his 
furniture was saved. What was known as "Monk House," a 
small building in the rear of the main house, was also destroyed. 
Conjecture is rife as to the fire, but nothing definite has been 
ascertained. The insurance amounts to 892,000, divided be-, 
tween twenty or twenty-five companies, which will cover the 
loss. Mr. McAlpine, the owner of the property, is in Europe. 
The furniture Avas mostly owned by Mr. Gregory, and Mr. T. 
R. Ganung,of-.the Lake, had an interest in it also. 

" The destruction of this popular summer resort will prove a 
severe blow to the prosperity of Lake Mahopac, and we fear it 
will be a long time before an establishment equal to the Gregory, 
will be built in that locality." 

The original hotel of Stephen Monk had been removed to a 
short distance from the main building and thus perished the 
oldest and largest of the hotels of Lake Mahopac. It was never 
rebuilt. The vacant lot is still owned by McAlpine. 

•The Improvement Company, after their purchase, began to 
plan improvements on an extensive scale. The first was the 
laying out and opening the Boulevard on the north and west 
sides of the lake; thus making a magnificent drive around the 
whole circumference. July 4th, 1S71, there was a grand cele- 
bration, the event being the opening of the Boulevard, which 
had been in progress for some time under a large force of en- 
gineers, mechanics and laborers. Upon this occasion the corner 
stone of the '-National Museum of Natural History," was 
laid. 

It would lie a difficult matter to find this corner stone at the 
present time, but the place where it was laid was a little west 



TOWN OF CARMEL. 337 

of the old GrifBn House, now occupied by Mr. Badeau. Tliere 
wasa^rand cavalcade, and the day closed with a fancy dress ball 
at which all the beauty and chivalry of the place were present. 
In a local paper occurs this statement: " The Land Improve- 
ment Company are preparing a large map under the direction 
of Gen. Viele. It shows an area of four miles square. It is a 
big thing on paper and may possibly be the fact in the future. 
If so Lake Mahopac will be the Arcadia of America, and will 
eclipse all other watering places in the country." 

When the Griffin farm was bought by Isabel Saportas, lier 
husband erected a house on the border of the lake, which he 
occujjied for a time. It was situated on the west side of the 
outlet of Wixsom Pond and as a stroke of business the com- 
pany sold this place to Peter B. Sweeney, of New York, for 
■S47,000, it being generally understood that the true object was 
to induce others of the notorious "Tweed Ring" to take a fancy 
to the real estate around Lake Mahopac, and to expend upon it 
some of the boundless wealth stolen from the city of New 
York; this attempt however was frustrated by the collapse of 
the noted combination which followed the downfall of its 
leader. 

Among the many projects it was proposed in 1872 to erect a 
" Musical and Art College" at the lake. This establishment 
was to be 430 feet in length, 300 feet wide, with a tower 230 feet 
high. It was to contain 400 suites of rooms, and a music hall to 
seat 2,500 persons. It is needless to state that this "Castle in 
the air " never had a more substantial existence. The following 
extracts from the local papers show the fate of this company: 

" May 1, 1875.— A few years ago a number of gentlemen, 
many of whom were interested in our new railroad, combined 
and formed an cn-ganization known as the Lake Mahopac Im- 
jjrovement Company. They purchased a large amount of real 
estate at and in the vicinity of the Lake, inch;ding several hotels 
and other valuable properties. The prices paid at the time were 
regarded by many of our most careful citizens as beyond the 
real value, and naturally enough had a tendency to inflate real 
estate valuations in that vicinity. The result was that property 
soon reached a i^oint where only the wealthy could purchase, 
and there it has remained until tlie present time, a sort of white 
elephant in the hands of its owners, with little prospect of speedy 
realization therefrom. 

22 



338 iiisToin' OF pctxam county. 

"The plans of the company on the start were well laid and in 
ordinary times, not altogether lacking in financial sagacity. It 
was intended to utilize the matchless natural advantages of Lake 
Mahopac, by converting the grounds in the vicinity into a sort 
of Arcadia, and causing to be erected thereon an endless chain 
of beautiful villas, for the summer homes of wealth, fashionand 
culture. Our chief regret is that a combination of circumstances, 
beyond the control of human forethought, has prevented a reali- 
zation of the hopes of the originators of the project. The hard 
times have reached them as well as every other business inter- 
est, and we find the wolf barking at their door, and in such loud 
tones as to create well grounded apprehension as to the ultimate 
success of the improvement enterprise. 

"A portion of the property owned by the Company — that 
known as the Saportas or Griffin Farm — has alreadj^ passed 
under the hammer, and this week we have four more foreclosure 
sales advertised. They will take place at the Thompson House, 
Lake Mahopac, on the 10th of June. The first on the list is the 
Carpenter property', which is foreclosed by Mr. Alvah Hyatt, 
under a third mortgage of $2,000. There is a $20,000 mortgage 
ahead of his. Next is the James D. Ganung farm, situate east 
of the Lake. The mortgage is foreclosed by Mrs. Mary Ganung. 
The sum claimed is $11,500. The third is the Lake House, 
known as the Slawson property, and occupied by J. G. Cole. 
It is sold under a mortgage held by Mr. Seeley Slawson for 
$5,000. The fourth and last on the list is the Isaac D. Barrett 
farm, situate at the outlet of Lake Mahopac. The mortgage is 
foreclosed by Mr. Thaddeus R. Ganung, under a claim of $.5,000. 
Thus is gradually fading out, under time and circumstances, 
the once promising and supposed powerful Lake Mahopac Im- 
provement Company.'' 

" Foreclosure sales at Mahopac, May 12, 1S75.— On Thursday 
last several important foreclosure sales took place at Lake Ma- 
hopac, of land belonging to the Improvement Company. The 
first sold was the Skwson House or Ballard property. It was 
struck off to C. H. Dewing, of New York, for $5,705. Mr. D. 
had a judgment against the Company for $100,000 which is a 
first lien on all the property after the mortgages are satisfied. 
The next parcel was the Barrett property, west of the 
Lake, which was foreclosed by Mr. T. R. Ganung. It was pur- 
chased by Mr. Dewing for $5,935, subject to a mortgage of 



TOWX OF CA U.MEL. 339 

§6,400. Tlie Gaming farm, consisting of 63 acres together 
with a five acre wood lot west of the Like, was next knocked 
down to the same party at §11,471, reserving right of way for 
railroad. The fourth and last sold was the J. W. Carpen- 
ter property, which was also purchased by the same party, for 
§1,700 subject to two mortgages, one for §13,000, and the other 
for §3,500. The sale was in the interest of Mr. Alvah Hyatt. 
Mr. Dewing, who purchased all the property, is supposed t^ be 
one of a number of members of the Company who propose to 
eat up all the little fish, and then reorganize the Company on a 
stronger basis.'' 

" Mahopac Improvement Company, Jan., 1879. — An applica- 
tion was made 'to Judge Barrett in the Supreme Court, Cham- 
bers, on Saturday the 25th inst., by a majority of the Trustees 
of the Lake Mahopac Improvement Company for the dissolu- 
tion of that corporation. The applicants were Messrs. A. Y. 
Stout, Joseph Seligman, John H. Cheever, William H. Griiion, 
Christopher Myer, John Q. Hoyt, and Andrew McKinney. The 
company was incorporated in March, 1S71, to exist for 30 years, 
with a nominal capital of $1,000,000 divided into 10,000 shares 
of §100 each. Of the entire number of shares, 2,500 were is- 
sued for cash. The remaining 7,500 were issued in payment for 
land acquired by the corporation on the borders of Lake Ma- 
hopac. Altogether the company obtained control of 714 acres 
of land, which it began to lay out into villa plots, and to im- 
prove otherwise. Before the work of improvement was com- 
pleted the financial crisis of 1S73 affected the operations and de- 
preciated the value of the company's jjropery. Being unable 
to sell any of the land the company mortgaged it heavily, and 
then having no ready money, borrowed more money lo pay 
taxes and the interest upon the mortgages. When no more 
money could be borrowed the mortgages were foreclosed, and 
all but 35 acres of land was sold out. These 35 acres, say the 
petitioners, are still in the possession of the company, but the 
mortgages and judgments against the land more than cover its 
value. The corporation has been insolvent for two years and 
has done no business for over a year. Judge Barrett referred 
the petition to ex-Judge L. Fancher, with instructions to ob- 
tain the views of the creditors of the ^corporation with respect 
to its dissolution, and also to ascertain its exact financial condi- 
tion." 



340 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

Upon the ruins of "The Mahopac Improvement ^Company " 
sprang up the "Mahopac Land Company," which was organ- 
ized November 1st, lS7o, the object beiag the "laying out and 
subdivision of land into building lots and villa plots at Lake 
Mahopac." The capital was $200,000 and the trustees were John 
H. Cheever, John Q. Hoyt, William H. Guion, Henry Knicker- 
bocker, Andrew McKinney, E. R. Wiggins and James Johnson. 
This company purchased, through Charles H. Dewing, several 
tracts which were sold under mortgage against the former com- 
pany and came to a similar end. 

The " Putnam Land Company," the successor of the preced- 
ing, was organized April 11th, 1878, with the same object^ and 
with a capital of $49,000. The trustees were Joseph Seligman. 
William H. Breeden, Andrew V. Stout, John R. Ford and 
Christopher xMyer. This company still has existence, and owns 
much land on the north side of the lake. The persons who en- 
gaged in a legitimate boarding house business all did well and 
were pecuniarily successful, but the speculators all came to 
grief and made a wretched failure. 

The three islands in Lake Mahopac form a very conspicuous 
feature of the landscape and claim an especial notice. The 
largest, or Grand Island as it is called, was sold by the commis- 
sioners of forfeiture to William Smith, May 16th, 1781, the 
deed describing it as " the large island in the large pond called 
Hustin's Pond." It was sold by him to Robert Johnson, pre- 
vious to 1800, and remained in his possession till the time of 
his death, June 19th, 1823, when it descended to his son, Wil- 
liam H. Johnson, who died January 28th, 1828, and by the 
terms of his will his executors were authorized to sell his real 
estate. The island was sold by Ward B. Howard and others, 
executors of William H. Jolinson, to Silas Slawson, December 
24th, 1828, for SooO. He sold it to Samuel Myrrick, who mort- 
gaged it to the Westchester County Bank, and it finally came 
into the possession of that institution. The president and 
officers of the bank sold it to Lewis H. Gregory, July 18th, 
1870, for $6,000. By foreclosure of mortgage it was sold by 
George Anderson, referee, to Elias B. Brown and Richard 
George, October 1st, 1879, and they remain its owners. A valu- 
able mine of iron ore exists on the island, which is now being 
worked by them. In the days of the glory of the Mahopac 
Improvement Company, it was proposed to build a large hotel 



Tow^i OF carmf:l. 341 

on the island, and run a steam ferry to the mainland, a project 
which was never realized. A cove on the shore, opposite the 
island, has ever borne the name of Indian Cove, and an emi- 
nence back of it is known as Indian Hill. The lake and its 
shore seem to have been a favorite resort of the aborigines. 

Tradition states that upon this island was held the last coun- 
cil of the Indian tribe that once ruled all the land around. 
This council was held for the purpose of considering the propo- 
sition to remove with other tribes to the far West. Canopus, 
the aged Sachem of the tribe, urged his followers to reject the 
proposal, and to rally to the defense of their empire and the 
graves of their ancestors; and his impassioned eloquence de- 
termined the council against the proposed removal. This le- 
gend has been written in elegant verse by John W. Lee, Esq., 
of New York. 

■' Once the airy curtain lifted, and tlie shadows rolling back, 
Shadows of the years that hover o'er the lake of Mahopac, 
Showed me Indian wariors gathered in the wooded island dell 
Which the rocks all M-om and moss-clad, and the waters guarded well. 

" Then upon the ledge above them, rose an aged, yet stalwart form, 
Like some monarch of the forest bending never to the storm: 
Rose the Chieftain of the Island with that bearing of a King 
Which the pride of birth may strive for, but the soul alone can Bring. 

" Turned his eagle gaze upon them, and with voice as clarion clear 
Waked the dreamers, and the waiting, wearied maiden sleeping near, 

' Rouse Mahicans, sons of heroes! keep your ancient honor bright, 
I have seen you in the battle — ye were lions in the fight. 

" 'I have seen you in the council, when the watch-fire lit the glen, 
And the clouds of war hung o'er us, ye were all undaunted then, 
When the faggots blazed around you, all defiant in your pain: 
I have heard you chant your death song. Chieftains now be men again. 

" 'Snake or traitor hissed that whisper, sell your forest there is rest, 
On the banks of the Mississippi, on the praries of the West 
Who the craven counsel utters? Let him in the fire-light stand 
Nay he dares not, crouching coward, palsied be thy trembling hand. 

" 'When the pale face, rushing on thee, grasps thy hatchet and thy bow 
Hark, the Spirit, Stand, Mahicans: guard your forest, meet the foe 
By the memory of our empire: by the mounds along the bank, 
Where our fathers hear the moaning of the river Kichtawanc. 

" 'Brothers, gird you for the struggle; breast to breast and eye to eye, 
Let us swear the oath of glory — one to conquer one tci die, 
Sound once more your ancient war cry: sound it from the mountains steep. 
Where the eagle hath her eyrie, and the rocks their vigds keep. 



342 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

" 'Twice ten thousand shouts shall answer from the river to the sea. 
Dare nor falter! Fear is failure! Craven hearted, will ye flee ? 
Go! yet on the darkening future, read the sentence of your doom 
As in letters of the lightning, traced upon a scroll of gloom. 

" 'Go! the western tribes shall meet you, ye will be an handful then. 
And shall perish in your weakness— perish from the minds of men 
Like your rushing highland river, in its mountains wild and free 
In the ocean lost forever. Thus shall be your destiny.' "' 

The next smaller island in the lake, called Petra Island, 
was sold by the commissioners of forfeiture to James Cock, 
January 10th, 1782, "Being all that island in the great pond 
called Hueston's pond, known and distinguished by the name 
of Hueston's island estimated to be six acres more or less." The 
price paid was three pounds. James Cock is supposed to have 
sold it to Peter Mabie who owned.it at the beginning of the 
century and was generally known as "Mabie's island." After 
his death it was sold by his son, Levi Mabie, to Sutton and 
Samuel Yail, September 5th, 1818. They mortgaged it with 
other property to Henry Strang and it came into his possession. 
It was sold by Washington Strang and others, executors of 
Henry Strang, to Pierre Humbert, a native of France, May 3d, 
1862, for 81,500, and he sold it to Dr. Lewis H. Gregory Sep- 
tember 29th, 1866. It remained in his possession till September 
15th, 1879, when it was sold by George Anderson, referee, to 
Judge Ambrose Ryder, and it was conveyed by him to Edwin 
McAlpine, in whose possession it now remains. It is a small 
rocky island and its intrinsic value would be difBcult to 
state. 

The smallest of the three islands is known as Ganung s island. 
This was probably sold by the commissioners of forfeiture to 
William Falconer. April 1st, 1823, William Falconer sold to 
Henry Slote, " All those certain parcels of land beginning at 
the northeast corner of Wm. Bailey's land by the Big Pond; 
then running around the big pond to a chesnut tree near 
Nicholas Remain's shop; then running west 8 chains, 44 links, 
to the corner of land formerly owned by Josiah Falconer and 
Wm. Bailey's land; then running north to the pond, the x^lace 
of beginning, containing about seven acres. 

"Also another piece called an island at south end of the 
Great Pond, and commonly called Little Island, estimated to be 
fifteen or sixteen rods north from Abel Smith's house, and about 



TOWN OF CAKMEL. 343 

the same distance west from Levi Bailey's land, containing one 
acre and fifteen perches, deemed to have become forfeited to 
the people of this State by the attainder of Roger Morris." 

The price for the two parcels was $100 "good and lawful 
money." Henry Slote sold the same premises to Aaron Carman, 
February Sth, 1828, offering to sell the seven acr^s for 8500, but 
demanded ten dollars extra for the island. After some dispute 
this was paid. Dr. Carman sold the island to Marian Ganung, 
December 31st, 1859, for 81,000, and it is still owned by her. 
This little island, greatly beautified and adorned, is one of the 
gems of the Lake Mahopac, and seems almost a portion of Fairy 
Land and well deserves its name of " Fairy Isle." 

Lake Maiiopac Methodist Church.— In the year 1822. and 
for some years previous, " Carmel Big Pond" was one of the 
preaching stations of the old Cortlandt Circuit which embraced 
a large section of country. The society in this place was duly 
incorporated, and at a meeting held July I4th. 1822, "at the 
house of Benjamin Townsend [west of the residence of Judge 
Edward Wright] the place where they statedly attended for 
divine worship," the members elected Leonard D. Cliff, Aaron 
Picker and Piatt P. Smith, trustees of the church. 

A piece of land was given to the society by Nathaniel Crane, 
which included the present church lot and extended to the 
shore of the lake, including the premises where the Lake House 
now stands. The church was built about 1826, and an additional 
piece of land was given by Nathaniel Crane, December 9th, 
1830. This last piece was one-fourth of an acre on the east side 
of the churchyard. The old road to Carmel ran on the west 
side of the church, and near where the Lake House now stands 
was the house of John Drawyer, who was one of the active 
members of the church, and bought the land next the lake from 
the trustees of the society in 1840. 

In the burying ground by the church are buried some of the 
older residents of the vicinity, and the following dates are from 
the tomb stones: 

James Smith, Aug. 24, 1871, age 60; Hester, widow of Jonathan 
Smith, Dec. 1, 1861, 78; Abel Smith, Oct. 12. 1829, 61; Barslieba, 
wife; Feb. 17, 1850, 79; Martin Shear, Xov. 12, 1863, 82; Letitia, 
wife, April 3, 1854, 63; Caleb Wright, Aug. 19, 1853, 81; Mary 
A., wife, Sept. 20, 185S, 86; Jolm Wixom, Sept. 19, 1870, 75; 
Betsey, wife, Jan. 7, 1880, SO; Daniel Baldwin, Jan. 24, 1842, ^h-); 



344 HISTORY OF PUTXAM COr>"Ty. 

Hannah, wife, Marcli 13, 1865, 86; William Hunt, Nov. 23, 1860, 
77; Marian, wife, June lo, 1838, 49; John Croft, Feb. 11, 1879, 
71; Hannah, wife, Sept. 30, 1868, 63; Elizabeth, wife of Reuben 
Gaming, Oct. 26, 1841, 80; John Ganung, March 10, 1840, 81; 
Anne, wife, Sept. 12, 1S27, 70; Robert Wright, April 5, 1883, 
87; John A'ail, Jan. 15, 1871, 73; Wm. Wright, Nov. 10, 1858, 
77; Margaret, wife, Jan. 19, 1841, 62; Robert Wright, April 19, 
1852, 78; Mary, wife, Feb. 16, 1830, 57; Daniel Gregory, Dec. 
17, 1868, 86; Adah, wife, Dec. 4, 1875, 87; Eleazar Baldwin, 
Aug. 27, 1868, 84. 

The parsonage of this church was bought of William Pincknej^ 
April 7th, 1866. It is situated on what was the old Croton Falls 
road, a short distance north of the present one. The west 
boundary of tliis parsonage lot is the original line between Lots 
5 and 6 of Philipse Patent. 

The Protestant Episcopal Church of Lake Mahopac was 
organized August 26th, 1860, by the election of Selah Van Duzer 
and G. Mortimer Belden, wardens, and William Perry, Lewis 
Ballard, Archibald S. Van Duzer, James A. Patterson, Reuben 
D. Baldwin, Benjamin T. Camp, George A. Crissey and Augustus 
Reed, vestrymen. 

Rev. Phineas Manning was the officiating minister and pre- 
siding officer. The usual place of meeting was in the "Horton 
Cottage" south of the Gregory House, then standing. The 
church lot was purchased of Marian Ganung, January 7th, 1884, 
and the church edifice built and dedicated. It was named The 
Church of the Redeemer. 

Tjik Rojiax Catholic Church was established by Rev. 
John Osnejo, and a lot was given for the edifice by Reuben D. 
Baldwin December 5th, 1866. The building was erected and 
dedicated August 15th, 1869. For several years this church was 
under the same pastor with the churches at Brewster and Car- 
mel. The parish was divided in 1882 and it was connected with 
the church at Croton Falls. The church edifice is a neat and 
convenient building and the service is well attended. 

Uxiox Valley Cemetery and Chapel. — This chapel is a 
branch of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Lake Mahopac. 
The cemetery association was organized February 28th, 1S60, at 
a meeting held at the house of James B. Ganung at which were 
present, Oscar Ganung, Samuel W. Travis, Stephen Yores, El- 
bei't Ganuuii-. Bailev Ganung, Charles Sloat, Gilbert Wright, Ben- 



TOWN OF OAR.MEr.. 345 

jamin McCulkiin, Erastus G-regory and Edwin C. Ganung. The 
land was sold to the association by Gilbert Wright March 22d, 
ISGO. It is described in the deed as "at an angle made by two 
pul)lic roads, one leading from Lyman Bailey's to Croton Falls, 
the other from Oscar Ganung's, intersecting the highway from 
Lynian Bailey's a few rods west of the residence of Gilbert 
Wright." The chapel was bnilt to accommodate people living 
at a distance, and was dedicated in 1860. 

TiiK Mount Hope Methodist Episcopal Chapel is situated 
at German Flats, north of Lake Mahopac, and is also a branch 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church at that place. The 
society was organized March 4th, 1876, at a meeting held in the 
school house in District 'No. 3, where they "statedly assembled 
for divine worship." The first trustees were Robert Barker, 
Darius Hopkins, Andrew J. Smith, James Sprague and George 
W. Potts. ■; '. :, 

Red Mills.— The outlet of Lake Mahopac, combined with 
that of Kirk Lake, furnishes a water iDower unequaled in the 
county. It was used at a very early date, and here were doubt- 
less located "Kirkhanrs Mills" mentioned in the laying out of 
roads in 1745. These were probably a small affair and were soon 
replaced by a much larger and more durable building which 
lasted more than a century. This mill, which is remembered by 
the present generation, was built-in 1756. It was built with 
massive timbers and covered with cedar, and from' the color 
which it was painted it was known to all the country round as 
"Red Mills." 

On Erskine's military map they are put down as "Robin- 
son's Mills." Although they were located on Lot 5 of Philipse 
Patent owned by Roger Morris, yet in the deed given by the 
commissioners of forfeitures they are mentioned as having 
"become forfeited by the attainder of Roger Morris and Beverly 
Robinson;" from which it is probable they were built by these 
men in partnersliip, and it must have been a very expensive 
building in its day. 

Like all the rest of the property of Roger Morris these mills 
with the hind around them were confiscated. On the 16th of 
May, 1781, Samuel Dodge, Jolm Hathorn and Daniel Graham, 
commissioners of forfeiture, sold to William Smith " All that 
certain tract or parcel of land called the Mill Farms, containing 
188 acres more or less. Together with all and sinu'ular the ad- 



34G 



HISTORY OF PUT^^\:^[ county. 



vantages and privileges heretobefore derived to the mills on 
tVie farm by the water issuing out of the two ponds with their 
outlets and several streams thereof, and including the large is- 
land in the large pond called Hustins Pond." The price was 
§2,750. The deed to John Le Clare conveys to him 89 acres, 
"excepting the waters with their courses as they run from the 
great pond through this farm for the use of William Smith's 
saw and grist mills."' Another still larger tract was also sold to 
William Smith lying between Mahopac and Kirk Lakes. 

The mills and the lands adjoining were sold by William 
Smith to Robert Johnston, about 1799. In the "Country 




OLD RED SnLLS. 



Jonrnal and Poughkeepsie Advertiser," January 9th, 1788, ap- 
peared the following advertisement: 

" William M. Smith No 7 Old Slip, New York, has for sale 
exceeding cheap, his Capital Mills, now let at §200 per year, 
with several farms near the same, in Fredericksburg Precinct." 

It seem? that the original deed to William Smith had been 
destroyed by fire and on the 28th of March, 1800, the Legislature 
passed an act for the " Relief of Ri^bert Johnston," by which 
the abstract on record in the clerk's office of Dutchess county 
should be held as legal evidence of the existence of the deed. 
Judge Robert Johnston remained in possession of the mills till 
the time of his death, when they descended to his son, William 



TOWN OF CARMEL. 347 

H. Johnston, who died in 1823, leaving ca will by which he 
authorized his executors, Ward B. Howard, Abraham Smith and 
Theodorus Van Wyck to sell his real estate. In accordance 
with this they conveyed to Cornelius J. Tompkins, May 1st, 
1829, one hundred and twenty- two acres of land " together with 
all the water privileges of the great and little ponds as heretofore 
belonged to Robert Johnston, deceased." January 1st, 1835, 
Cornelius Tompkins sold the same to John Haflf and Ira Dean 
for $12,000. October 4th, 1837, they were sold by John Haff 
and his assignees to Amzi L. Dean and Isaac Lounsbury. 
Lounsbury bought the share of Amzi Dean in 1840 and he sold 
the mills to Amzi Slawson March 31st, 1855. 

Amzi Slawson kept the mill property till October 1st, 1858, 
when he sold it to Seeley Slawson, and he conveyed it to William 
and Charles Theill April 28th, 1862. William Theill sold his 
share to Charles Theill August 30th, 1864, and he conveyed it 
to George Juengst of New York Febrnary 1st, 1865. He pur- 
chased it for the manufacturing firm of Thomas J. McArthur 
and others to whom he gave a deed January 2d, 1866. McArther 
and his associates organized the " Empire Sewing Machine Com- 
pany " and the premises were sold to this company May 1st, 
1866. It was intended by this company to establish a large 
manufactory at this place, an intention which was frustrated by 
subsequent events, and the entire premises and water rights 
were sold to the " Mahopac Manufacturing Company," Janu- 
ary 10th, 1869. This company had already established a large 
manufactory on the Muscoot River, in Westchester county. In 
September, 1870, the Board of Water Commissioners of the 
city of New York took possession of the water privileges and 
from that time the occupation of the famous "Red Mills," 
like Othello's, was "gone." For several years the city paid an 
annual rent for the privilege of drawing water from the lakes 
but under the act of 1879 for enlarging the powers of the commis- 
sioners the premises were taken for the use of the city, and on 
June 14th, 1881, Hubert O. Thompson, chief of the Department 
of Public W'orks, offered for sale at auction the "superstruc- 
ture wood work and machinery of the Red Mills," and they 
were purchased by Lewis Baker for S227. 

Tlie buildings were torn down and the ponderous beams and 
timber with the cedar covering, sold in small parcels, and the place 
tluit had known it for a century and a quarter knew it no more 



348 HISTORY OF PUTXAlt COU>'TY. 

forever. The site of this building was on the north side of the 
road and on the east side of the outlet of the two lakes. Kirk 
Lake, which is the "little pond" mentioned in the deed to . 
William Smith, is 591 feet above the sea and covers 101 acres. 
From Lake Mahopac to the Red Mills there is a fall of 126 feet 
and from the water flowing over the dam at the mill the locality 
gained the name of Mahopac Falls. The removal of the dam 
when the old mill was destroyed has rendered this name no 
longer significant. In addition to the grist mill, which did a 
large business for the early times, there were also saw mills and 
a fulling mill. It is said that the first carding mill in the coun- 
try was brought here by an Englishman named Ellinworth 
about 1800. He first set it up in Peekskill where it remained 
two years and he then brought it up to the Red Mills. 

Previous to the Revolution it is stated that Col. Roger Morris 
had a log mansion near the mill, to which he and his wife, as 
lord and lady of the manor, came, during the summer months, 
to visit their highland estate and their tenants. The residence 
of Mrs. Augustus Odell, a short distance west of the old mill 
site, encloses a portion of the original log house thus occupied 
by the former owners of all this section of country. The story 
that Major Andre stopped at this house while being taken to 
the Robinson House after his capture has no foundation in 
fact. 

The Mahopac Iron Ore Company was incorporated Sep- 
tember 23d, 1879, with the following ofiicers : W. F. Buckley, 
president; H. M. Braem, treasurer; H. N. Brinsmade, secretary; 
W. H. Case, superintendent. The New York office of the com- 
pany is at 69 Wall street. About 150 men are employed in 
working the mine, which is situated on that fjortion of the Hill 
farm sold by Solomon Hill to Asahel AV. Humphrey, December 
24th, 1870. It was first opened by Arthur F. Wendt, of New 
York city. The completion of tlie Mahopac Falls Railway, 
which connects the mine with the New York City & Northern, 
afl'ords a convenient outlet and greatly facilitates the transpor- 
tation of the ores to the Pennsylvania furnaces. 

The Rkd Mills Baptist Church was organized in 1832 by 
Elder John Warren, sen., who was at that time pastor of the 
Carmel church. In August of that year a number of members, 
twenty-five in all, met at the house of Isaac Barrett and ap- 
pointed delegates to the churches of which they were members. 



TOWN OF CAiniEL. 



349 



requesting letters of dismission that they might be organized 
into a society to be known as the Red Mills Baptist Churcli. 

The church was constituted September 26th, 1832, by a 
council at which Elders John Warren, Mitchell, Nathaniel 
Robinson and Moses Barrett were present and officiated. 

At tirst there was no regular pastor, but Elder Warren fre- 
quently preached. It is said that in the summer time the meet- 




B.VPTIST CHURCH, JIAHOPAC FA 



ings were held in Mr. Barrett's orchard. December 22d, 1832, 
Brother Enos II. Ballard was licensed to preach and in May, 
1834, the church called for his ordination. He remained the 
pastor for one year and during this time seventy were added to 
the church. Tlie failure of his health caused a termination of 
his services. In January, 1836, Elder Higby became pastor and 



350 HISTOKY OF PUTNAM COUNXr. 

remained till March, 1838. The pulpit was then supplied for a 
time by Elder Gill but in 1840 there was some discord in the 
church. In this year Elder Ballard again took charge and re- 
mained till 1845 and eighty members were baptized. At this 
time Brothers Henry Hazen and David Taylor were licensed to 
preach. In 1845, Elder C. Brinkerhoff was called to the pas- 
torate and remained till November 12th, 1847. In that year 
Brother C. C. Norton was licensed to preach the Gospel. Dur- 
ing 1S4S-9 the pulpit was supplied by various persons and in 
1850 Brother Ballard again became pastor and remained till 
185S. In October of that year, Elder David Sampson became 
pastor but the period of his service was cut short by death. 

In 1860 the church called Brother J. Timberman who remained 
two years. In 1862 Brother J. Allen was pastor. He was suc- 
ceeded by Rev. H. Alley, who was ordained in 1864 and re- 
mained till August 21st, 1869. Rev. Jabez Marshall was pastor 
in 1871. Rev. J. W. Holman was called August 1st, 1873, and 
remained till March, 1875. He was succeeded by Rev. H. B. 
Warring, who resigned March 1st, 1879. Rev. J. G. Shrive was 
called to the pastorate in that year and he remained till April, 
1881, when he resigned. 

The church lot" was sold to Isaac Barrett, Alvah Colwell and 
Cornelius J. Tompkins, trustees of the church, by Isaac Bar- 
rett August 17th, 1832. It was described as being "on the west 
side of the Peekskill road and at the northeast corner of John 
Beyea's, jr., lot and on the southeast corner of Isaac Barrett's 
orchard near his house and running along the road 1 chain and 
containing 1 rood, 22 rods." A lot on the east side of the road 
"nearly opposite the dwelling house of John Beyea, Jr.," was 
sold to the trustees by Cornelius J. Tompkins on the same day. 
The church was built shortly after. In 1868 the edifice was re- 
modelled in modern style at a cost of §13,000, and was re- 
dedicated January 23d, 1869. 

In the burying ground adjoining the church rest many of the 
early members of the society.- The following dates are taken 
from the tombstones:- 

"James Carver, died July 2, 1837, age 55; Sarah, wife, Dec. 
18, 1844, 06; Hosea Carver, "^ Apr. 25, 1854, 41; Cornelius Hill, 
Nov. 22, 1833, 44; Samuel Horton, April 11, 1866, 77; Sarah, 
wife, Aug. 12, 1845, 55; Gilbert Travis, April 27, 1839, 71; 
Nicholas Agor, Jan. 12, 1839, 68; Marv, wife, March 10, 1837, 



TOWN OF CARMEL. 3.^1 

T2\ Rachel, wife of John Simpkins, Jan. 4, 1844, 95; Zophar 
Kirkham. Oct. 20, 1S46, 63: Susan, wife, April 6, 1842, 63; An- 
thony Hill, Feb. 22, 1867, 74; Dorothy, wife, July 2, 1872, 81; 
Wm. W. Hill, July 24, 1863, 33; Sarah, wife of Noah Hill, 
May 13, 1846, 70; Daniel Wright, Feb. 23, 1865, 70; John Beyea, 
Sept. 12, 1848, S.i; Sally, wife, Nov. 24, 1833, 66; John Beyea, 
Dec. 19, 1864, 74; Peter Beyea. Nov. 17, 1873, 79; James Wix- 
om, Feb. 18, 1849, 76; Elizabeth, wife, July 21, 1839, 72; Cor- 
nelius F. Williams, Aug. 27, 1854, 68; Leeta, wife, April 12, 
1857, 75; David Hazleton, March 24, 1848, 57; Abraham Cronk, 
April 26, 1871, 76; Robert Wixom. Sept. 19, 1861, 79; Laban 
Cole, May 2,' 1848, 49; Esther, wife, Sept. 10, 1833, 35; Levi H. 
Cole, Oct. 17, 1860, 69; William Agor, Nov. 16, 1848, 75; Eliza- 
beth Cole, wife of Wm; Agor, Feb. 15, 1841, 66." 

Two of the former pastors of this church are buried here and 
the following inscriptions are on their monuments: 

" Rev. Daniel Sampson, died Aug. 8, 1859 aged 60 yrs. 2 mos. 
and 2 days.'.' 

"Rev. Enos H. Ballard, nearly 20 years pastor of Red Mills 
Baptist Church, Departed to be with Christ Oct. 25, 1861. 
Aged 53." 

Red Mills PitESByTERiAisr Church. —This church is offici- 
ally styled the ''First Presbyterian Church of the town of 
Carmel," not because it is the oldest but from the fact that it 
was the first incorporated. As far as learned, preaching ser- 
vices were held in this i)lace as early as 1761, and the first min- 
ister who labored here is supposed to have been Rev. Samuel 
Sackett, who was at that time pastor of Hanover or Yorktown 
Church. It is probable, however, that Rev. James Davenport 
may have ministered both here and in Carmel at an earlier date. 
The first building erected for church services was dedicated 
in 1784. It stood upon the site of the present church edifice, 
upon land owned by Mr. Peter Badeau, who died in 1816, aged 
88 years. The cemetery adjoining was deeded in trust by 
Mr. Job. C. Austin, in 1862. The following is the description 
of the original building, as given by Dr. AYallace: "It 
was at the close of the Revolutionary War that the land was 
donated, and preparations made to build. As yet there was no 
organization l)ut the congregation deemed it best to secure a 
permanent shelter. The people made contributions of labor 
and timlier and other material so that but a small amount of 



352 



IIISTOKY OF PUTXAM COUNTY. 



money was required. It was very plain in appearance, without 
cupola or steeple, was nearly square and the gables stood east 
and west. The entrance was on the south side and opened into 
the audience room. Originally there was also an east and west 
door. It had a gallery extending across the south side and the 
two ends of the house, the open stairs leading to it being located 
in the south corners. It was mainly occupied by the singers. 
For a long time the bass and alto occupied the south gallery 
facing the minister, the treble being in the east and the tenor 
in the west galleries, facing each other. The pulpit was on the 




PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, MAHOPAC FALLS. 



north side and was octagon shaped after the wine glass pattern 
and was very high up, entered by a winding staircase; above it 
was a sounding board; below it was the reading desk, by the 
-side of which the deacons sat in what was called the Deacons' 
Pew. Around the house was one row of square high backed 
pews and in the center were plain board benches known as the 
Free Seats. For thirty-five years there was no fire in the build- 
ing to heat it. Many of the families brought foot stoves; but 
worse than this, they sat in the unwarmed church and heard two 



TOWN OF fAK.AEEL. 353 

sermons with only a short intermission between tliem in win- 
ter's cold and storm, after coming lono: distances. 

" In 1S19, the house vvas repaired and received a coat of yel- 
low paint on tlie outside. At this date a plain box stove was 
brought in, which was a marked innovation upon the customs 
of the past. It stood nearly in the center of the house, and the 
pipe passed directly up through the ceiling. At this day such 
a building w^ould seem uncomfortable and unsightly; "^but in 
those primitive times, it was deemed a goodly house and served 
the purposes of a generation who were accustomed to plainness 
and hardship." 

About 1880 the church was considered so unsafe that it was 
decided to erect a new building. This building was dedicated 
in 1S33. It continued in use until 1S76, when it was remodelled 
into the pi-esent attractive edifice. About all that remains of 
the second building is " Embraced within the iron pillars of the 
present structure." The latter will comfortably seat about 300, 
and is one of the most cheerful and attractive country churches 
in the Presbytery of Westchester. 

The following is a list of the ministers who have preached 
here either as pastors or as stated supplies. The first one 
known to have held service here, was the Rev. Samuel Sackett 
who seems to have made this one of his stated preaching places 
from 17H1 until 178i. He was succeeded in 1785 by the Rev. 
Silas Constant, pastor of the Yorktown church. Durin"- his 
pastorate at Yorktown, the Lord's Supper was foi; the first°time 
celebrated at Mahopac Falls, then called Red Mills. This was 
on February 5th, 1789. In 1790 a distinct church was oi'ganized 
and incorporated. In 1792 the Rev. Ichabod Lewis supplied 
the church. Following him came Mr. John Hickox, who was 
succeeded in 1803 by Mr. Stephen Dodd. His successor was 
the Rev. Herman Daggett who came in 1810. Xext came the 
Rev. John Townley, and in 1812 the Rev. Allan Blair com- 
menced his ministry here, remaining fifteen years. '-He was 
stated supply during all this time, and remained in char.o-e the 
longest of all the ministers who have ever labored here.'" In 
1828, when the church became connected with the Second 
Presbytery of A'ew York, it was supplied for a short time by 
the Rev. Joseph McElroy, D.D., who was followed in 1829 h'v 
tlie Rev. Robert Thomi)son, the latter remaining only a feu- 
weeks. His successor was the Rev. Jonathan Huntington, wlio 

'23 



354 HISTORY OF PUTXAH COUNTY. 

remained here during the erection of a second church edifice, 
and preached his dedicatory sermon in January, 1833. Fol- 
lowing him came the Rev. Samuel R. Ely who supplied for 
one year and was then called for pastor. He was ordained and 
installed December 4th, IS34, and was the first minister ever 
regularly settled over the church. Under Mr. Ely's ministry 
wa.s organized the first Sabbath school connected with the 
church. The Rev. Joseph Ninimo was installed in 1837, re- 
maining here until 1840. The Rev. Joshua Betts was ordained 
and installed in 1841, and was succeeded in 1842 by the Rev. 
Samuel Pettigrew, who remained till 1844. In 1845, the Rev. 
James B. Hyndshaw began his ministry here which lasted until 
1850. For three years thereafter, the Rev. John H. Hunter, 
D. D., and the Rev. Alfred P. Botsford were in charge. In 
1854, the Rev. Joseph C. Foster was installed, and after five 
years of labor was compelled by ill health to resign his charge, 
in 1859. The Rev. Richard H. Richardson. D. D., began his 
ministry here in 1860, resigning in 1863, going hence to New- 
bury port, Mass., and from that place to the Fourth Presby- 
terian Church of Trenton, N. J., where he is still settled. The 
Rev. Wm. H. Hodge, now of Columbia Avenue Presbyterian 
Church of Philadelphia, was installed here in 1864, and re- 
signed. in 1868. For two years thereafter the Rev. Carson W. 
Adams, D. D., supplied this church. The Rev. C. C. Wallace, 
D. D., was installed in 1870, and resigned in January, 1881. In 
April of the same year, the present pastor was called, and was 
ordained and installed June 7th. 

During the pastorate of the Rev. Joseph Ninimo, 1837-40, 
there were registei'ed eeventyeight members. During the pas- 
torate of Mr. Wallace, the membership was one hundred and 
thirty-eight. On the first of May, 1884, there were registered 
one hundred and sixty-three names. There are now six elders, 
three deacons and nine trustees. The organization of the church 
also includes a Colporteur, a Ladies' Aid Society, a Ladies' 
Missionary Society and Band and a Sabbath School. 

The present condition of the church is such as to justify 
hopeful expectations of its future continued usefulness. 

The church was incorporated April 7th, 1806, and at that' time 
Dr. Elias Cornelius, Abm. Smith, Charles Heroy, Seward 
Whetin and William Webb were elected "Trustees of the first 
Preslivterian Church of Carinel.'" At this time a formal deed 



TOWN OF CARMEL. 3,=)5 

was given to tlie trustees for the church lot which had been built 
upon long before. By this deed Peter Badeau, sen., and his 
wife, Elizabeth, conveyed to the trustees above named, "For 
and in consideration of the adoration due to the Supreme Beino- 
and for the better maintenance of the Almighty God * * * 
All that certain piece of land which agreeable to a survey made 
in 1787 hath its directions and is bounded as follows: Begin- 
ning at a chestnut, the northwest corner near the school house, 
thence south 13^^ west 4 chains 39 links then S. 17^ east 1 chain 
SO links then N. 41 east 5 chains 60 links to a heap of stones 
and corner of Richard Dean s land then N. 63 west 3 chains 65 
links to the beginning. Containing 1 acre of land." Another 
piece of one-half acre opposite the church was sold bv Isaac 
Badeau July 21st, 183S. 

The Rev. Harris Rogers Schexck, the present pastor, was 
born in Philadelphia, Pa., February 27th, 1856. His father is 
the Rev. AVilliam E. Schenck, D. D., for thirty years secretarv 
of the Presbyterian Board of Publication. His mother was the 
daughter of William Torrey, of Manchester, N. J., and niece 
of Professor Torrey, of Princeton College, later connected with 
the assay office in New York city. On the death of his mother, 
the child, still an infant, was much of the time under the 
care of his grandmother. When about seven years of age, he 
was placed at a boarding school at Elizabeth, N. J. From there 
he went back to Philadelphia, where he attended school until 
sixteen years of age, when he entered Princeton College. After 
his graduation in 1876, he was appointed assistant teacher at the 
Princeton PreparaLory School, then under the charge of the 
Rev. C. J. Collins. While there liis health bi-oke down, neces- 
sitating a trip to Florida and an absence of four months. On 
his return to Princeton in May, 1877, Mr. Schenck spent some 
months in special work, entering Princeton Seminary in the fall. 
After taking a four years' course, he received a call to the Pres- 
byterian Church of Mahopac Falls, N. Y., in the Presbytery of 
Westchester. The call was given on April 6th, 1881. Mr. Schenck 
took charge as supply and pastor-elect May 1st, and was installed 
June 7th, 1881. Under his care the church has been very prosper- 
ous and greatly increased in numbers. As a representative of 
the Presbyterian Church the eneigy and usefulness of Mr. 
Schenck are widely recognized and his intluence is felt among 
his ministerial l)rethren. 



356 HiSTORr OF putnam county. 

Mr. Schenck has been twice married. His first wife was a 
daugliter of David F. Hollister, Esq.. of Bridgeport, Conn. She 
died June 12th, 18S2. He was married in 1SS4 to a daughter of 
David E. Smith, M. D., of Bronxville, N. J. 

The burying ground by the Presbyterian church is the oldest 
in this portion of the town and here ''The rude forefathers of 
the hamlet sleep." The following names and dates are taken 
from the stones: 

Ebenezer Boyd, March 27, 18-48, age 82; Louisa, wife. May 12, 
1841, 81; Isaac Lounsbury, Mar. 16, 1881, 66; Ira Pinckney. 
July 9, 1872, 79; Mary, wife, Nov. 7, 1861, 59; Mary, wife of 
James Seeley, Mar. 3, 1859, 90; Abm. Slawson, May 10, 1829, 
92; Mary, wife, Sept. 3, 1826, 87; Silas Slawson, Jan. 1, 1860, 
78; Clari'issa, wife, Aug. 5, 1856, 70; Joseph Odell, Dec. 22, 1864, 
77; Clarrissa, wife. May 19, 1857, 69; James Vernal, Dec. 16, 
1873, 84; Susan, wife, April 25, 1866, 73; Elijah Dean, Ang. 18, 
1808, 49; Sarah, wife, Dec. 18, 1835, 72; John Tompkins, Oct. 
20, 1839, 55; John Tompkins, Jan. 3, 1842, 65; James Tompkins, 
Mar. 7, 1873, 85; David, son of William and Mary Lewis, Sept. 
1, 1803, 21; Jonathan Miller, Jan. 1, 1815, 68; Mary, wife, Aug. 
3, 1801, 55; Esther, wife, Aug. 24, 1835, 59; Eliphalet Hull, July 
19, 1813, 54; Emma, wife, Jan. 5, 1833, 70; Hezekiah Hull, Nov. 
1, 1823, 69; Sarah, wife, April 23, 1850, 89; Sophia, wife of Philip 
Minthorne, May 8, 1807, 51; Charles Heroy, Dec. 15, 1824, 75; 
Phebe, wife, April 29, 1821. 70; Peter Heroy, Feb. 15, 1795, 39; 
Catharine, wife, July 22, 1836, 76; Dr. Elias Cornelius, June 13, 
1823, 65; Joshua Myrrick, June 19, 1813, 88; Jane, wife. May 27, 
1811, 78; Charles Heroy, Dec. 28, 1785, 66; Benj. Crosby, July 
22, 1797, 53; Rachel, wife, Feb. 25, 1791, 43; Hannah, wife of 
Dr. Robert Weeks and daughter of Benj. Crosby, July 18, 1795, 
29; Willet Travis, Oct. 30, 1869, 94; Michael Yandervoort, 
April 1, 1812, 41; Jonathan Whiting, Jan. 14, 1797, 59; Rachel, 
wife, June 10, 1830, 88; Isaac Austin, Oct. 14, 1813, 67; Ann, 
wife', Dec. 30, 1811, 66; Job Austin. Feb. 7, 1847, 88; Hannah, 
wife, Dec. 13, 1839. 84; Mary, wife, Sept. 18, 1793, 34; John 
Dean, NoV. 23, 1832, 35; Adah, wife, Nov. 2, 1837, 31; Mar- 
garet, daughter of Elias and Margaret Van Arsdale,May 1,1806, 1 ; 
Robert Johnston, Jan. 19, 1823, 89; Elizabeth, wife, Sept. 27, 
1832. 82; Wm. H. Johnston, Jan. 10, 1828, 49; Daniel Travis, 



TOWN OF CARMEL. 357 

Alls'. 7, 1844, 65; Peter Badean, Aug. 9, 1816, 88; Katharine, 
wife, Feb. 1790, 64; Elder Allen B. Smith, April 7, 1834, 37- 
Elizabeth, wife Peter Badean, Oct. 29, 1826, 77; Elizabeth, wife 
John Secor, May 28, 1791. 52; a rude stone bears the following: 
" 1784, April XI E. S. 70 old," a puzzle which we leave to others 
to solve. Isaac Badeau, Sept. 7, 1842, 93; Deborah, wife, April 
5, 1840, 77; Ebenezer Wright, March 6, 1806, 43; Rachel, wife, 
Oct. 27, 1829, 66; Robert Wright, May 19, 1818, 81; Jonathan 
Whiting, Nov. 6, 1869, 87; Eunice, wife, Feb. 29, 1848, 61; 
John Thorp, Dec. 1, 1837, 76; Rath, wife, April 7, 1814, 56; 
Caleb Carpenter, Oct. 4, 1791, 25; Ephraim, son of Billy and 
Rhoda Trowbridge, Mar. 8, 1791, 14; Salome, wife of B. H. 
Miller, Oct. 22, 1809, 54; Henry Dillingham, Mar. 21, 1812, 54; 
Mary, wife. May 10, 1797, 32; Elijah Wright, July 17, 1815, 69; 
William Campbell, Dec. 11, 1864, 63; Charles Pinckney, Oct.' 16,' 
1834, 68; Nathan Lane, Sen., Nov. 28, 1811, 72; Eleanor, wife, 
March 4, 1815, 74; Charity, wife of John Smith, April 29, 1813, 
52; John Crookston, Feb. 6, 1793, 36; Eleanor, wife, April 13, 
1848, 88; Abraham Smith, Oct. 26, 1813, 49. 

The Putnam Coqnty Seminary Association was organized 
in 1857 for the purpose of furnishing facilities for advanced 
education. The first trustees were Joseph C. Foster, Amzi L. 
Dean, Saxton Smith, Amzi Slawson, Isaac Hill," Isaac Louns- 
bury and Ira Pinckney. On the 9th of September 1857, a lot 
was sold to the trustees by Job C. Austin "On the east side of 
the highway leading from the Presbyterian Church to the said 
Austin's house and one chain and sixty links north of a wild 
cherry tree standing in the burying ground and extending east 
to the road from the church to the Red Mills." Uj)on this lot 
a school building was erected, at a cost of §1,000, and a com- 
petent teacher employed, and the institution was started with a 
fine prospect of success. It continued for several years but 
without being as prosperous as its founders expected. The 
building was sold under mortgage foreclosure to Amzi L. Dean, 
who sold it to the Presbyterian church in August, 1870. It 
was moved to a place near the church and is now used as a 
reading room. The successive teachers were Rev. Daniel S. 
Gregory, Rev. Mr. Butler, Mr. Samuel S. Appel and Irvino- 
Wright. 

The Western Part of Carmei..— On the north side of Long 



358 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUXTY. 

Pond was the farm of Timothy Carver", who was a descendant 
of the fifth generation from John Carver, who came over in the 
" Mayflower." He came with his wife to this town from Bridge- 
water, Plymoutli county, Massachusetts, about 1757, and be- 
came a tenant of Roger Morris. He died before the Revolution, 
and his sons, Timothy and Barnabas, continued to live in the 
same locality. After the Revolution (November 16th, 17S2) Tim- 
othy Carver bought a large tract on the north side of Long 
Pond from the commissioners of forfeitures for seventy-one 
pounds. Here he built a log house and began clearing up the 
farm. He lived here till the time of his death, which occurred 
about 1824 at the age of 71. The farm was sold by him to his 
son, James Carver, January 6th, 1817, for §(1,750, and there is a 
peculiar interest connected with this farm from the fact that it 
was the one that John Jacob Astor entered suit for as a test of 
his famous claim. James Carver sold the farm to Ebenezer 
Barrett, April 9, 1833. After the death of Ebenezer Barrett it 
went to his son Isaac and he left it to his son Elias Barrett, 
who died intestate and it was sold to his widow, Mrs. Susan 
Barrett, who is its present owner. The old log house built 
by Timothy Carver stood a short distance northwest of 
the present dwelling. The farm of Judge Barnabas was a tract 
of nearly 300"acres which was a part of Lot 6 of the Philipse 
Patent and adjoined the west line of the lot and extended east 
to the Croton River. The bridge over the Croton on the road 
from Carmel to Long Pond was near the northeast corner of the 
farm and hence bore the name of Carver's bridge. Timothy 
Carver, brother of the judge, fell off this bridge while going 
home one night and was drowned, about 1824. Judge Carver 

'Timothy Carver married Rebecca Washbm-n. Their children were: Rebecca, 
wife of Jeremiah Hughson: Jlehitable, wife of Daniel Pierce; Timothv, born 

October 30th, 1753, drowned about 1824; Thankful, \vife of Abbott; and Judge 

Barnabas, born 1761. died August 29th, 1831. He married Sarah Cole but left no 
children. Timothy Carver, second, married two sisters named Baldwin. His 
children were Elijah, James, Barnabas, Lewis, Eleazar, Henry, Hannah (wife of 
Jeremiah Ganung) Zillah and Sarah. All the sons e.xcept James went to Indiana. 
James Carver was born 1782 and died July 2d, 1837. He was the nominal defend- 
ant in the Astor suit: he married Sarah, daughter of Thomas Townsend. Their 
children were: Marianne, wife of James Ganung; Charlotte, wife of Ramah 
Cole; Rachel: Jane, wife of Stephen Smith: Phebe, wife of Orson Hazen, and 
Hannali. Hosea Barnabas Carver (son of Timothy the second) married Hannah, 
daugliter of James Townsend, and had children: James M., Frederick, and 
Stephen W., who is now living in the to^"n of Carmel. 



TOWX OF CARMEL. 359 

on the corner where the road turns north, about three quarters 
of a mile west of the bridge. The stone chimneys of the house 
bought this farm of Frederick Philipse and his house stood 
are yet standing though the building itself has been recently 
torn down. Judge Carver left no children, and gave his farm 
to his two nephews, Barnabas Carver and Abizar Pierce, son of 
Daniel Pierce. The homestead and 175 acres comprised the 
share of Barnabas who died about 1870, and the place was sold 
by mortgage foreclosure to Eleazar H. Ganong who now owns 
it. The west part of the farm was the share of Abizar Pierce. 
He sold it to James Harvey Reed, who is now living upon it, 
and moved to Auburn, N. Y., about 1835. The original line 
between Lots 5 and 6 is a few rods west of Mr. Reed's house. 
Judge Barnabas Carver was member of Assembly in 1806 and 
one of the judges of Common Pleas for a long number of years, 
and one of the foremost men of the county. He died April 
29th, 1831, aged 70. His wife, Sarah, died December 4th, 1851, 
aged 88. A family burying ground not far from the house con- 
tains their graves and also others from which we take the fol- 
lowing dates: Chloe, wife of William Yeoraans, died April 14, 
1854, age 80; Jeremiah Ganung, jr., Aug. 21, 1863, 84; Hannah^ 
wife, Aug. 30, 1S69, 84; Daniel Pierce, April 16, 1837, 85; Lewis 
Pinckney, July 9, 1831, 70; Timothy Pierce, April 30, 1839, 63. 
Peter Anderson came to this country from Scotland about the 
year 1760, and rented of Roger Morris a farm now in the town 
of Carmel, near the Mahopac Iron Ore Company's mine. When 
this farm was sold by the commissioners of forfeitures in 1782, 
he purchased it, and the greater part of it has been owned by 
the family ever since, it being now owned by Silas A. Anderson, 
a great-grandson of the first owner. 

'Peter Anderson married Mary Curry and they had the follow- 
ing children: John, who married Ann Travis: James, who mar- 
ried Susan Ganong; Elizabeth, who married Cornelius Hill; 
Susan, who married Elijah Xelson; and Eleanor, who raarfied 
John Crookston. 

John Anderson I'emoved to Dutchess county, where his rwo 
sons, John and Peter, with some of their descendants, still 
reside. 

Elizabetli, Susan and Eleanor, with their husbands, lived in 
the vicinity of the homestead, and a number of the descendants 
of Elizabeth still live in tiie neighborhood. 



360 JIISTOKY OF PUTNAM COU:srTi'. 

James retained and lived on the homestead and had the fol- 
lowing children: Sarah, wjio married Green Thorn; Elizabeth, 
who married Samuel Ferris; Mary, who married, 1st, Charles 
Van De Yort, 2d, Ira Pinckney; Susan, who married Alfred 
Lounsbury; Hannah, who married John A. Akin; Peter, who 
married Mary Austin; Mila, who died single; John, who died 
when a small boy. They all lived and died within a few miles 
of the place of their birth, and but few of their descendants 
have ever removed to any considerable distance. 

Peter acquired the title to the homestead and resided on it 
up to the time of his death which occurred in 1SS2. He had 
the following children: James T., who married Annie Louns- 
bury; Mila, who died single; Silas A., who married Mary 
Emigle; George E., who married Eliza Agor. 

James T. owns and lives on a farm in the town of Somers, 
Westchester county. Silas A. lives on the homestead, having 
purchased it, and George E. lives and x^i'actices law at Carmel, 
Putnam county. 

SuPEKVisoKS OF Carmel: Timothy Carver, 1795; Devoe 
Bailey, 1796 to 1797; Barnabas Carver; 1807 to 1814; Daniel 
Thorn, 1815; Joel Frost, 1816-17; Joseph Benedict, 1818; Joel 
Frost, 1819-20; Silas Slawson, 1821; Seth Foster, 1822; Silas 
Slawson, 1823-25; Walker Todd, 1826-28; Silas Slawson, 1829- 
30; Thomas Hazen, 1831-32; Joseph Morehouse, 1833; Silas 
Slawson, 1834-35; Robert Austin, 1836-38; AzorB. Crane, 1839- 
40; Wm. H. Sloat, 1841; Robert Wright, 1842-43; Stephen 
Knapp, 1844; Peter Anderson, 1845-48; Robert Wright, 1849; 
Cornelius Dean, 1850; Peter Anderson, 1851; Robert Wright, 
1852; Wm. Clawson, 1853; Amzi L. Dean. 1854; Israel Pinck- 
ney, 1855; Augustus Hazen, 1856-57; Henry A. Gahn, 1858-60; 
James H. Lee, 1861; Isaac Lounsbury, 1862; Lewis H. Gregory, 
1863-66; Nathan L. Thompson, 1867-69; John Cornish, 1870; 
Alonzo W. Hadden, 1871—72; Charles L. Austin, 1873-77: 
Alunzo W. Hadden, 1878; Augustus Hazen, 1879; Edward C. 
Weeks, ISSO; Nathan A. Stokum, 1881; Ambrose Ryder, 1882; 
Augustus Hazen, 1883-84; Wm. O. Mead, 1885-86. 



3t( 



CHAPTER XXI. 

TOWN OF CARMEL (Concluded). 

The Hill Family.— Thp Crane Family.— The Baldwin Family.— The Barrett Fam- 
ily.— Abram Cronlc— Cornelius Dean.— Alotson Dean. — Lewis Ludiii^jton. — 
Charles Henry Ludiugton. — James Liidington. — Zalmon Liidington. — Deacon 
Aaron Ganong. — Leonard Yeamans.— The Badeau Family.— The Hazen Fam- 
ily.— Jeremiah W. Hazen.— The Gregory Family.— The Austin Family.— 
Lewis Ga Nun.— Thaddeus R. Ganung.— Robert D. Wixsom.— Nathan L. 
Thomijson.— James C. Gulick.— The Miller Family.— Dr. Henry F. Miller.- 
Hon. Henry D. Clapp.— Bryant S. Palmer.— Dr. James H. Merritt.— The 
Foster Family.— William "W. Everett.— The Weeks Family. 

THE Hill Family.— 'J'he ancestor of tliis family was Capt. 
William Hill, who came from England, and was one of 
the early settlers on the Roger Morris Lot in Philipse Patent. 
Cai^tain Hill, who was born in 1726, married Bethiah Smith. 
The children of this marriage were: 

1. Noah, born in 175o, who married Sarah, daughter of Israel 
Pinckney, and had four children: Uriah, Anthony, Chloe, wife 
of David Wright; Esther, wife of Seth Curtis, and after his 
death married Bently H. Wixsom. Noah Hill, the father of 
this family, died January 3d, 1S30, aged 7o years, 9 months 
6 days. 

2. William, born December 14th, 1760, died November 29th, 
1851. He married Nancy, daughter of Israel Pinckney, and 
their children were: Gilbert. -Indrew, Avery. Jacob, Alza, Wil- 
liam, Sarah, wife of Stephen Pinckney, Mary, wife of Jabez 
Zeloph, Rachel, and Bethia, wife of Elijah Depew. 

3. Cornelius, b(jrn in 1764. died November 12th. ISlo. He 
married Elizabeth, daughter of Peter Anderson, and had chil- 
dren: Noah, James, Phebe, wife of John Smith, and Mary, wife 
of Arva M. Pieice. 

4. Solomon, who was a Baptist i)reacher, and went to 
Canada. 



362 HISTORY OF prTXA:\[ county. 

5. Andrew, who was drowned when young. 

6. Abraham, whose descendants are given below. 

7. Charity, wife of Jonathan Stokum. 

8. Chloe, wife of Joseph Crane. 

9. Esther, wife of Charles Heroy. 

10. Jane, wife of Thomas Lounsbnry. 

11. Polly, wife of Isaac Rhodes. 

Abraham Hill, son of Capt. William Hill, was born July 24th, 
1774, and died March 25th, 1813. He married Deborah, daugh- 
ter of Israel Lounsbury. She was born April 18th, 1780. and 
died September 6th, 1849; they were married January 18th, 
1798. The children of this marriage were: Mary, born June 
19th, 1799; Isaac; Addi-son, born May 27th, 1803, died June 5th, 
1863; Solomon; Tamar, born May 31st, 1807, married James W. 
Horton; Thomas, born June 10th, 1809, died April 19th, 1878; 
and Abraham, born May 5th, 1811. 

Isaac Hill, the oldest son of Abraham Hill, was born May 3d, 
1801, and married Mary, daughter of Horace Gregory. Their 
children are: Elizabeth G., Mary D., wife of Elias B. Glen, of 
Wayne county, N. Y.; Sarah F., wife of Irving Wright; InezC, 
and Thomas T., who married Ella F., daughter of Manning- 
Merrill, and has two children, Frederick M. and Alice G. The 
residence of Mr. Isaac Hill is about a mile north of Red Mills 
on a farm that was purchased of William H. Johnston, March 
Sth, 1827, and which is bounded east by Kirk Lake. Mr. Hill 
died March 1st, 1886, at the age of So. This farm, as well as 
that of Solomon Hill adjoining is on the east side of the road 
running north from Red Mills and directly opposite the original 
" Hill Farm " hereafter described. 

Solomon Hill, son of Abraham Hill, was born April 9th, 1S05. 
He married Hannah, daughter of Michael Sloat, and his chil- 
dren are: Allen B., Tamar A. (wife of Leonard Curry of West 
Somers, who has two children, Charles H. and Jennie B.), and 
Charles S., who married Clorinda, daughter of Daniel Squires, 
and has two children, Albert L. and Nellie F. Mr. Solomon 
Hill is now living at the advanced age of 80, on a farm about a 
mile and a half north of Red Mills, and to his retentive memory 
we are indebted for many facts relating to the early history of 
this vicinity. 

James Hill, son of Cornelius, and grandson of Captain Wil- 
liam Hill, married Sarah, dauirhter of Lewis Pincknev, and has 




ISAAC HILL. 




s> - - ---''^-"^ ' ' 



TOWN OF CARMJiL. 363 

children: Cornelias, Lewis, Mary, wife of Smith S. Austin; 
Charlotte A., wife of Robert D. Wixsom; Joseph (deceased); 
Elizabeth, wife of Sturgis Buckley; Caroline, wife of Leon 
Hotchkiss; and William of New York city. Mr. James Hill is 
now living on a portion of the original "Hill Farm." 

Abraham Hill, son of Abraham and grandson of Capt. Wil- 
liam, married Tamar, daughter of Daniel Lounsbury. They 
had two children, Theodore and Hannah J., wife of Peter B. 
Curry, 2d, of Jefferson Yalley. 

The old homestead of the Hill family, which has ever borne 
the name of the " Hill Farm,"' has an especial interest from the 
fact that it was the first piece of land ever sold in Putnam 
county. In the deed of marriage settlement given by Mary 
Philipse and Roger Morris January 14th, ]7o8, the power was 
reserved to sell sufficient land to amount to the sum of £3,000. 
It was in accordance with this reservation that Roger Morris 
and his wife Mary sold to William Hill, September 2otli, 1763, 
the farm which is thus described in the deed : 

"All that certain farm: known as farm Number 36 of Lot No. 
5 of the lands formerly granted by Patent to Adolph Philipse, 
Esq., which said farm begins at a hickory sapling, being the 
north corner to lots No. 35 and 43. and running south six de- 
grees, 45 minutes east, 16 chains 37 links, thence south 9 de- 
grees 29 chains, and 34 links to thecornerof lot 34, thence south 
33 degrees, 30 minutes, west 16 chains 45 links, thence south 33 
degrees, 30 minutes west, 11 chains 27 links to the corner of lot 
number 15, thence south SS degrees west 33 chains to a beech 
tree, being the corner to lots 14, 15 and 37, thence north 7 de- 
grees 30 minutes east 16 chains 59 links to an ash tree, thence 
north IS degrees east 9 chains to a maple tree, thence north 41 
degrees 30 minutes east, 11 chains 72 links to a red oak tree, 
then north 73, east 32 chains, S3 links, to a red oak tree being 
the corner of lot No. 39, thence south 67 degrees, 15 minutes, 
east 4 chains, 39 links, thence north 24 degrees, east 10 chains, 
33 links, to a beech tree: being the corner to lot number 40, 
thence by the same to the place of beginning, containing 245 
acres." 

Tlie price paid for this tract was £750, " current money of the 
Province of New York." The mines and minerals on this farm 
were excepted and reserved. In accordance with the usage in 
those days a lease of the premises "for one whole year" was 



c!b4 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

given to William Hill, and the deed was executed on the follow- 
ing day. This was in accordance with the law " for transferring 
uses into possession," by which a person holding land, by a lease 
for one year was deemed, in actual possession. 

Capt. William Hill divided this farm among four of his sons; 
the south part, containing 98 acres, he gave to Abraham, whose 
heirs sold it to Thomas Hill. At the time when Anthony Hoguet 
and his associates were anxious to buy "Hoguet's Point," in 
Lake Mahopac, of Abijah Smith, he refused to sell unless they 
would bay him this farm in its place. Accordingly the arrange- 
ment was made, and Thomas Hill sold it to Abijah Smith Sep- 
tember loth, 1S54, and he lived on it till the time of his death, 
when it fell to his only child, Sarah, who married Peter B. 
Curry, 2d. Their only surviving child, Sarah A., married Kel- 
sey Agor, and they are now the owners of this part of the origi- 
nal " Hill Farm."' 

The part of the original farm next north of the above was 
given to Solomon Hill, who sold it to his brothers, Abraham and 
Cornelius, and it is now owned by Cornelius Hill, the grandson 
of the Cornelius above. This part was 20 acres, and next north 
was 42 acres, which was given to Noah Hill, who sold it to 
Thomas Lounsbury. He conveyed it to James Hill, son of Cor- 
nelius, and it was sold by his assignees to Cornelius, son of 
James Hill, who now owns it. 

To the north of this was a tract of 27 acres given to William 
Hill. He sold it to Abraham, his brother, who left it to his chil- 
dren. It was purchased by Solomon and Isaac Hill from the other 
heirs, and they sold to theii' brother, Thomas, who re-sold it to 
Solomon, and it was sold by him to Asahel H. Humphieys, De- 
cember 24th, 1879, and it now belongs to the Mahopac Iron 
Company, and the "Hill Mine" is located on it. 

At the north end of the original farm was a piece of 10 acres 
given to Noah Hill to make his part as good as the rest. He 
conveyed it to his brother, Abraham, who left it to his children, 
and it was bought by Solomon from the rest of the heirs and 
sold by him to Anthony Stokum, and it was sold by his ad- 
ministrators to AVilliam Agor, its present owner. 

The old house in which Capt. William Hill resided, stood 
just north of the family burying ground. It was torn down 
about 1843. 



tow:n of carmel. 365 

In the family burying ground on this farm are the graves of 
several generations. 

Capt. William Hill, the ancestor of the family, died in August, 
1790, aged 70. His wife, Bethia, died in August, 1798, at the 
age of 60. 

The dates of the deaths of the other members of the family 
are given above. An elegant monument marks the resting 
place of the wife of Charles S. Hill, Gloriana, who died January 
oth, 1S84, at the age of forty-four. 

The Crane Family. — The ancestor of this family was John 
Crane, who came from Suffolk, England, and settled in Massa- 
chusetts about 107o. He was a soldier in the Indian war of 
1720, and present at the attack on Deerfield. Fortunately es- 
caping from the battle he afterward settled at AVindham, Con- 
necticut. He is said to have had two sons, Jonathan and 
Joseph, the latter settling in New Jersey. 

Jonathan Crane had one son, Joseph, who was born May 
17th, 1869, and removed to the Oblong about 1740, and settled 
on the bank of the Croton River. Here he built "Crane's 
Mills," which were frequently mentioned as a landmark in the 
early records. These mills are on the premises now owned by 
Stephen C. Barnum, Esq., about three quarters of a mile below 
Milltown, but the site once so famous in our local history will 
doubtless soon be obliterated by the building of the new reser- 
voir. 

Joseph Crane died August 20th, 1781, at the age of 85, leav- 
ing children: Zebulon, born January 25th, 1721, died January 
24th, 1789; Joseph, 2d, born September 13th, 1722, died October 
14th, 1800; Mary, born May 30th, 1726. died March 17th, 1805; 
Thaddeus, born March 28th, 1728, died in September, 1803; 
Abijah, born April 3d, 1730, died 1806; Anna, born April 12th, 
1732, died March 25th, 1814; and Adah, born October 25th, 1736, 
married James Baldwin. 

Joseph Crane, the father of this family, married Mary, 
daughter of Samuel Conch. She was born December 15th, 1695. 
Zebula Ciane, the oldest son, married Sarah, daughter of Wil- 
liam Belden. The children of this marriage were: Capt. John, 
born November 24th, 1742, died June 7th, 1827; William, born 
1744; Zebulas, born August 7th, 1746, died December 31st, 1814; 
Elijah, born April 1st, 1748; Sarah, born July 12th, 1750; Mary, 



366 HISTORY OF PUT.YAM COUNTY. 

born October 8th, 1752; BelcTen, born November 31st. 1754; 
Samuel, born April 11th, 1757; Abijah, born May 26th, 1759; 
Stephen, born April 11th, 1761; Anna, born August 3d, 1763; 
and Seth, born in 1766. Mrs. Sarah Crane and five of her chil- 
dren, namely, Mary, Belden, Stephen, Seth and Anna, died in 
1769, while the family was living in Litchfield, Connecticut. 

Capt. John Crane, the oldest son, married Tamar, daughter 
of John and Hannah Carpenter. They vvere married March 1st, 
1764, by Rev. Eliphalet Ball, the first settled minister of Balls- 
ton, Saratoga county, N. Y. The children of this marriage 
were: Jose^^h, born June 3d, 1766, died December 25th, 1835; 
Adah, born June 6th, 1768, married Moses Fowler; Stephen, 
born November 1st; 1770, died September 9th, 1826, moved to 
New York; John, born June 6th, 1773, died June 1st, 1825; 
Elijah, born October 3d, 1775, married Abraham Knox; Nathaniel, 
born February 2Sth, 1778, died September 27th, 1855; Sarah, 
born June 27th, 1780, married Alvah Trowbridge; Arabella, 
born December 25th, 1784, married William Waters; Clorinda, 
born October 2d, 1787, married James Reed. 

Joseph Crane, the oldest son, married Chloe Hill. Their 
children were: Ira, who went to Yates county; Noah, who died 
unmarried; Judge Azor B.; Ada, wife of James Baldwin; 
Emeline, wife of Reynolds Piatt; Cornelia, wife of Lewis 
Crosby; Betsey, wife of Thomas Foster; Zillah, wife of Gilbert 
Travis. 

John Crane (the fourth son), married Hannah, daughter of 
Daniel Gregory, and had children : Samuel; Eliza, wife of 
Stephen Knapp; Sally, wife of Gilbert Ganung; Elijah; Clo- 
rinda, wife of Stephen Monk; Nancy, wife of Elias Newman; 
Nancy, wife of AVilliam Monk; Harriett, wife of Isaac New- 
man; Annis, wife of John Monk; Ada, wife of Benjamin Mead; 
Alsas; Rosalinda, wife of Henry A. Gahn; and Susan, wife of 
Lewis Hutchings. 

Nathaniel Crane married Martha, daughter of Benjamin 
Tovvnsend. Their children were: John, who died in childhood; 
Tamar; Caroline, wife of Pierce Pinckney; Charlotte, wife of 
Amnion N. Fowler; Joseph, left no descendants: Nathaniel M., 
now living at Mahopac; Elizabeth, wife of Thomas Wright; 
Augusta S., wife of Reuben W. Kirkham, and Benjamin T. 

Benjamin T. Crane, born January 24th, 1824, is now living on 
tlie old homestead of his grandfather, Captain John Crane. 




>^ ^ .6, 



TOWN OF C ARM EL. 367 

This was a laige farm wiien sold to Capt. Crane by the com- 
missioners of forfeiture, and he added to it very lar^elv by 
various purchases, and as his sons grew up and were married, 
he gave them farms. His oldest son, Joseph, had the farm 
where his grandson, Ira Crane, now lives. Stephen had a farm 
two miles south of LakeMahopac, and now owned by Cornelius 
Dean. John had a farm of ]30 acres on the east side of the 
road, and opposite the old homestead. To Nathaniel he left 
the homestead, and it descended to Mr. Benjamin T. Crane, the 
present owner, who also owns the greater part of the farm given 
to John Crane. 

The original house which was the home of Capt. John Crane, 
and where he kept a tavern for fifty years, was an old fashioned, 
long, low one-story building, an excellent style of the dwelling- 
built before the Revolution. It was torn down in 1S78, having 
stood more than a century. The present elegant residence was 
built three years previous to the destruction of the old one. 

Mr. Benjamin T. Crane passed the early part of his life on 
the old homestead. At the age of eighteen he commenced 
business as a cattle drover, and followed it for fifteen years. 
He then settled on the farm, and made agriculture his principal 
business. To the original tract he added by purchase the farm 
formerly owned by his uncle, John Crane, and the old Baldwin 
farm formerly the homestead of Elisha Baldwin, the ancestor of 
that family, so that his real estate now exceeds 300 acres. Mr. 
Crane married Emma A., daughter of Samuel AYashburn, of 
Carmel, January 11th, ISGO. She died December 21st, 1SS3. 
The children are Anrelia, Samuel B., Gertrude, Nathaniel M., 
and Benjamin T., all of whom are now living at home. Mr. 
Crane held the office of justice of the peace for sixteen years, 
besides other positions of public trust. He is a director of the 
Putnam County National Bank. For many years he has been 
a trustee of the Gilead Presbyterian Church, and is closely con- 
nected with its interests. 

Capt. John Crane was a brave and gallant officer in the Pev- 
olution and a highly respected and influential citizen in civil 
life. He was one of the judges of the Common Pleas in 
Dutchess county, and also of Putnam, after its establishment. 
Many anecdotes are related of his shrewdness and eccentrici- 
ties. . Joseph Ciane was also one of the judges of Common 
Pleas in 1S13. 



368 HISTORY OF PUT]S'AM COUNTY. 

Judge Azor B. Crane was born May 25tli, 1801, and died 
October 14th, 1864. He married Aurelia, daughter of Demas 
Doane. She was born February 21st, 1814, and died October 
22d, 1859. Their children were: Benjamin D., born September 
6ih, 1832, living in Carmel; Ira, born August 13th, 1834; Azor 
B., born May 15th, 1838, died September 9th, 1841; George T., 
born February 28th, 1840, died March 2d, 1841; George B., 
born August 3d, 1845, died June 19th, 1848; Joseph H., born 
December 12th, 1850, and now living at Mt. Kisco. 

Judge Azor B. Crane was born on the homestead of his father, 
Joseph Crane. This place, which is one of the oldest home- 
steads in the county, was the original home of Deacun Eleazar 
Hamblin, who settled here in 1740. It was afterward in pos- 
session of John Carpenter, whose daughter, Taraar, married 
Capt. John Crane, and it was purchased from the heirs of John 
Carpenter by Joseph Crane. The old house built by Deacon 
Hamblin stood just north of the present residence of Ira Crane, 
and on " Fish Brook," the outlet of Long Pond, and on the 
south end of the original farm Deacon Hamblin had his saw 
mill, which is mentioned in the survey of Lot 6 in 1762. 

Judge Azor B. Crane was, during his whole life, one of the 
principal citizens of Putnam county. In 1843, he was appointed 
judge of the Court of Common Pleas. 

He was the first county judge and surrogate elected under 
the new constitution in 1847. He held offices of honor and 
trust in the county for many years. 

The farm which descended to him from his father, is situated 
verv nearly in the center of the town of Carmel, the east bound- 
ary being the original line between Lots 5 and 6, in the Philipse 
Patent. 

In private life the judge was a man of great benevolence and 
kindly feeling, which made him popular among all classes of 
people, and the poor and afflicted found in him a ready and 
efficient friend. In public afl:"airs he was noted for his integ- 
rity and good business capacity, and his opinions and discus- 
sions were always received with the respect they most justly 
deserved. 

Ira Crane, son of Judge Azor B., inlierited the old homestead 
which has now been in possession of the family for three gen- 
erations. Upon this he has passed his days as an ngriculturist. 
For several years he has been connected with town affairs as 




^.4^/^r^ /^ 




^<?-r^^ 



^^c 



e;2^^^5^2^ 



TOWN OF CAUMEL. 369 

overseer of the poor and commissioner of highways. The farm, 
as stated before, is on the west side of the Roger Morris lot. 
The north boundary extends from the east line of this lot west 
to Long Pond. Its original south boundary toward the east 
side was "Fish Brook where Deacon Hamblin in the olden 
time had his saw mill." 

Mr. Crane married Louisa E., daughter of Martin Strang of 

Yorktown. They have one son, Agor B., born October Sth, 1S84. 

The residence of Mr. Crane was built by John Carj^tenter, 

shortly after the Revolution. It has been greatly enlarged and 

improved by Joseph Crane and his son, the Judge. 

Joseph Crane, 2d, lived on the old homestead in Southeast, 
on the Oblong, and died there leaving a family of thirteen chil- 
dren: Colonel Jonathan, born April 27th, 1747, died August 27th, 
1S84; Dr. Joseph, born 1749, died Xovember 21st, 1825; Solomon, 
born December 26th, 1750; Isaac, born January 26th, 1753; 
Eunice, born November 20th, 1754, married Comfort Sears; 
Esther, born December 26th, 1756; Josiah, born July 11th, 1759; 
Ira, born August 14t]i, 1761; Daniel, born September 17th, 1763; 
Nathan, born August 1st, 1765; Molly, born May 21st, 1767; 
Josiah N., born June 10th, 1770; Arza, born September 29th, 
1772. 

Colonel Jonathan Crane married Bethia Baldwin, and his 
children were Deborali, Josiah, Isaac, Anson, Jonathan, Esther, 
and Orvin B. Nearly all of these are buried in the cemetery at 
Milltown. 

The homestead of Col. Jonathan Crane viras on Crane's Ridge, 
in the town of Southeast. This farm contained 118 acres and 
was sold to him by the commissioners of forfeiture after the 
Revolution. It was left to his son, Anson Crane, by whose heirs 
it was sold, and passed out of the possession of the family. It 
is now the property of Charles C. Fitzhugh, Esq. For several 
years previous to the purchase by its present owner, it was 
owned by John T. Kennedy, Esq., of New York, who gave it 
the name of " Fairview Manor," by which it is now known. 
This farm was bounded on the east by the Oblong line. 

Dr. Joseph Crane was a member of the Provincial Congress 
in 1776 and member of Assembly 1778-79 and 1796. 

Col. Jonathan was one of the foremost men of the county 
during the Revolution, and was esteemed as a brave and prudent 
ofiicer. 



370 HISTORY 01' PUTNAM COUNTY. 

The Baldwin Family'. — The ancestors of this family were 
four brothers, George, John, Henry and James, who came to 
America about 1740, and settled in Connecticut. 

James, the youngest, came to Carmel about 1750, and was the 
ancestor of all the families of that name in Putnam county. 
He had five sons: Elisha, Henry, Ephraim, James and Pearce; 
and four daughters: Phebe, Jatharine, Charity and Hannah. 

Elisha Baldwin was an early resident near Lake Mahopac, his 
homestead being a farm now owned by Benjamin T. Crane. He 
married Elizabeth Cromwell, and they were the parents of seven 
children: Elisha, Daniel, James, Mary, wife of James Sutton; 
Elizabeth, wife of James Youngs; Zilphia, wife of Solomon 
Wright; and Laetitia, wife of Martin Shears. Of the sons, 
Elisha, the eldest, settled in Dutchess county; James, the young- 
est, married Adah, daughter of Joseph Crane, and had sons: 
Noah and James E. of Peekskill. 

Daniel Baldwin was born in 1777, and died January 24:th, 1842. 
By various i)urchases he became one of the most extensive land 
owners around Lake Mahopac, and built the "Baldwin House," 
which was an extensive and well patronized hotel, and was 
burned about ISoo. He married Hannah Strang, one of a family of 
thirteen children, twelve of whom lived to the average age of 88 
years. Hannah Strang was a daughter of Henry Strang, of York- 
town, who was a captain in the Revolution, and a gallant officer. 
Their children were: Elisha, Hazzard, Henry S., Elizabeth, wife 
of Samuel Berry, and Gertrude, wife of Robert Smith. 

Henry S. Baldwin was born November 13th, 1801, and his 
earliest years were passed on the old homestead. When ten 
years of age he came with his parents to reside on the old Maoie 
farm, which his father had bought, the house standing on the 
shore of the lake. This was torn down and a new dwelling 
erected on the same site in 1826, which was burned as stated 
above. Li 1827 Mr. Baldwin married Eliza, daughter of Eleazar 
Baldwin, and began life for himself, settling on a farm of 100 
acres, which belonged to his father. On this farm he built the 
mansion now known as the Carpenter House at Lake Mahopac, 
in 1827. At one time he owned here 225 acres of land. Of this 
he sold 125 acres to Ebenezer Horton, on which the " Horton 
Cottage" was built, and in 1868 he sold 100 acres to Samuel 
Kaufman for !?30.000. Mr. Kaufman proceeded to make great 
iuii)i-i)venient3 upon the premises, and erected the '-Kaufman 




w:.. 



-^^ y^L/^- i-^ 



"zM--^^ 



TOWN OF CARJIEL. 371 

House " at a large expense. About 1840 Mr. Baldwin purchased 
the farm where he now resides, of William Bailey. This farm 
was formerly a portion of the estate of Devoe Bailey, and the 
location, which is on the east side of the road, about half a mile 
south of the lake, was in early times known as " Kenicofs Hill," 
probably from an early occupant. Here he built his present resi- 
dence in 18GS, and has made agriculture his occupation for the 
greater part of his life. 

Mr. Baldwin has two sons, James M. and Henry K. The 
former is now living in Kansas, where he is the owner of sev- 
eral thousands of acres of land, and is very extensively engaged 
in stock raising. The latter has a very extensive farm in York- 
town, Westchester county, on which he now resides. Mrs. Eliza 
Baldwin died December 22d, 1884, at the age of 76. Mr. Bald- 
win, now in his 84th year, but as vigorous as many a man twenty 
years younger, still takes a lively interest in the affairs of the 
county and town. 

A few words concerning other branches of the Baldwin family 
may not be amiss. Elisha Baldwin, as stated above, had four 
brothers, Pierce, James, Ephraim and Henry. 

The last married Mary Lounsbury, and had children: Henry, 
James, Eleazar, John, Isaac. Lydia, wife of Obed Cole, Sarah, 
wife of Stephen Hitchcock, and Hannah. Of these Eleazar was 
born in 1784 and died in 1868. He married Hannah, daughter 
of Reuben Cole, and had two children, Reuben D. and Eliza, 
wife of Henry S. Baldwin. 

Reuben D. Baldwin owned a farm at Baldwin's Place Station 
on the New York City & Northern Railroad, and gave the 
land for the depot on condition it should be called by that 
name. 

James Baldwin, brother of Eleazar, was born in 1759. He 
removed from Carmel to Southeast, where he had a large farm 
on Starr's Ridge. He exchanged this for a farm near Luding- 
tonville about 1827, where he passed the rest of his days. He 
married Susannah Yail in 1780. Their children were: Daniel, 
born 1781, died 1874, married Betsy Field; Fanny, wife of Peter 
Dykeman; Henry, born 1787, died 1863, married Mary Smitli; 
Polly, wife of James Townsend; Aaron, born 1791, died unmar- 
ried 1812; James, born 1793, died 1865, married Cornelia Lud- 
ington; Betsy, wife of Allen Light, born 1799, died 1833; Dorcas, 
wife (jf Peter Whitney; Nathan C, born 1800, died March 2d, 



372 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

1SS4, married Eliza Smith; Susan, wife of David Russell; Han- 
nah J., wife of Jacob Sunderlin. She was murdered at her 
residence in Patterson in March, 1883. 

Nathan C. Baldwin, the ninth child, was at the time of his 
death, not only the last of his father's family, but the last of a 
whole generation. At one time he had 93 brothers, sisters and 
cousins, on his father's and mother's side, and outlived them 
all. He died at the residence of his son, Peter W. Baldwin, of 
Pawling, March 2d, 1884. 

Another son, W. R. Baldwin, is a lawyer in Brooklyn, N. Y. 

The Bakrett Family.— In the list of taxpayers of Fredricks- 
buro- in 1777 appear the names of Isaac, James, John, Justus 
W. and Marcus Barrett. What relation they were to each 
other cannot be traced with certainty. 

Isaac Barrett married Jemima Lockwood, and their children 
were: Mary, wife of Marcus Barrett; John, born about 1775, and 
died in December, 1861; Ebenezer; Abigail, wife of Joseph 
Haight; and Isaac, born January 23d, 1788, died November 
13th, 1869. 

Isaac married Rachel, daughter of John Beyea, who was born 
in 1792. and died December 26th, 1871. They were married 
March 10th, 1813, and the children of this marriage were: Sarah, 
born July 5th, 1816, married Theodore B. Wilson; and Peter 
Beyea, born September 26th, 1829. 

Mr. Peter B. Barrett, married Mary A., daughter of Enos 
Hazen, who was born August 17th, 1829. They were married 
June 4th, 1851, and have four children; Isaac L., Thomas E., 
Sarah J., and Emma J. (deceased). 

The farm upon which his home is situated was originally 
Farm No. 15, of the Morris Lot, and was sold after the Revolu- 
tion to Stephen Whitney, who sold it to his son-in-law, Michael 
Vandervoort, who kept a tavern there in the olden times. This 
house stood a short distance north of Mr. Barrett's residence, 
and was sold to his father, Isaac Barrett, by William and Sarah 
A'andervoort April 9th, 1829. The old house was torn down in 
1859, and on the site Mr. Barrett erected a dwelling house which 
he now owns. The farm extended north to the famous " Hill 
Farm," and south to a point below the Baptist church. 

The residence of Mr. Bai'i-ett is on a portion of the original 
farm, and was bought and owned by Richard Dean in 1794. He 




J>iL\J^ Sii\.yJh 



TOWN OF OARMEL. .^76 

is said to have sold two acres of it to the Presbyterian church, 
and a parsona,ge was built on it. This house and lot having 
been given by the church to one of the ministers, Eev. Stephen 
Dodd, he is reported to have sold it, and after some transfers it 
was purchased by Mr. Isaac Barrett about 1826. The parsonage 
house, a plain old-fashioned building, was torn down, and the 
j)resent elegant residence erected in 1873. 

The old orchard south of the house was the place where the 
first meetings of the Baptist society were held, and the church 
lot was donated by Mr. Isaac Barrett, who, with his family, was 
closely identified with the advancement and welfare of the so- 
ciety. 

The place descended to Mr. Peter B. Barrett at the decease of 
his father, which occured in 1869. Mr. Barrett has made agri- 
culture the business of his life, and in addition to the original 
Vandervoort farm he has purchased a portion of the old "Mill 
farm," formerly owned b\^ Judge Robert Johnston. 

Mr. Barrett has been connected with town affairs as commis- 
sioner of highways, and overseer of poor. For many years 
he has been deacon of the Baptist Church his father helped to 
build. In politics he has ever been a strong supporter of the 
republican party. 

Isaac Barrett, the grandfather, was a soldier in the Revolution, 
and one of the guards stationed at Red Mills. 

The original home of the family is in the locality known as 
Barrett Hill, in the northwest part of the town of Carniel. 

Isaac Barrett left the old homestead to his heirs, audit was 
eventually purchased by John Barrett who bought the shares of 
the rest. On this place he lived and died, and the place de- 
scended to his son, Allen, whose heirs sold it to John Parker, 
the present owner. 

John Barrett, the eldest son of Isaac Barrett, was born about 
1775 and died in December, 1861. He married Sarah, daughter 
of Isaac Drew, .and their children were: Ferris, who married 
Laura, daughter of Elder Moseman Barrett, and had two chil- 
dren, Absalom, and Sarles; Jemima, wife of Samuel Barrett; 
Allen, who nuirried Sarah, daughter of James Drew, and had 
two children, James W. and Charity, wife of Chauncey Smith; 
Sarah, wife of Nathaniel Wixsom; John, who married Marga- 
ret, daughter of JNlichael Mead, and is now living at Fishkill; 
Fanny, wife of Hiram Cole; Simeon, who married Emily, 



374 HISTORY OF PUTNAM C0U:NTT. 

daughter of Jacob Clawson, and is living in Catarangiis county; 
Annis, wife of Moses Mead; Moseman, who married Margaret 
Gay, and after her decease married Cornelia, daughter of Fred • 
erick Ludington (He has a son George D., who lives at Red 
Mills); Isaac D. ; Wright, who married Rebecca, daughter of 
Jacob Clawson, and is living in Dutchess county (He has two 
sons, Oscar and John J.); and Amanda, who died young 

Isaac D. Barrett, the tenth child named above, was born at 
the old homestead on Barrett Hill, October 27th, 1829. At this 
place he remained till the time of his marriage, and then began 
housekeeping on a portion of the original farm. Here he stayed 
two years, and then removed to a farm which his father bought 
in Peekskill Hollow, and now owned by Sarles Drew. He after- 
ward purchased a farm of George Tompkins, south of Red Mills, 
and lived on it nine years. He then purchased a farm on the 
west side of Lake Mahopac of Abram Cronk, which he sold, and 
it became a fjart of the lands of the Lake Mahopac Improve- 
ment Company. 

In 1872, Mr. Barrett purchased his present residence from the 
heirs of Selah Ballard. This place, which is on the east side of 
the road, a short distance south of the Red Mills Presbyterian 
Church, has been greatly improved by him, and is an elegant 
and convenient home. 

Mr. Barrett has made agriculture his principal business, and 
has held the office of assessor for several years. As a member 
of the Baptist church, his interest in its welfare has never 
ceased. For twenty-five years he has been deacon in the church, 
and it is a remarkable fact that all of his brothers have held the 
same office in this or other churches. He is also superintendent 
of the Sabbath school and treasurer of the society. 

Mr. Barrett married Tamar, daughter of Abram Cronk, Feb- 
ruary 14tli, 1852. They were the parents of one daughter, who 
died December 11th, 1879, at the early age of 22. 

This young lady was a general favorite in the community, 
and a bright and shining ornament in the Baptist church of 
which she was a loved member. Her loss was deeply felr and 
greatly mourned. The following notice, which appeared in the 
papers, expressed the feelings of all who knew her : 

"Bakkett— At Mahopac Falls, N. Y., Dec. 11th, 1879. Miss 
Ida E., only daughter of Deacon Isaac D. and Tamar A. Bar- 
rett, in her 23d rear. 




^_Je^^^c,u:34^^ Q:^ ^^(Xe<-^^^x^^^-'><.^^^ 



TOWN OF CARMEL. 375 

'' Her life from childhood was devoted to Christ. She was 
baptized into the fellowship of the Mahopac Falls Baptist 
church in the 14th year of her age, and her spotless character 
and pleasant manner won the admiration and love of all. Dur- 
ing her sickness of nearly five years her suffering was at times 
intense, and she had many fears' that she would fail to gain 
heaven, but she never murmured. Her constant prayer was 
that Jesus might be with her, and Jesus indeed was. Her 
last days were passed in almost angelic serenity and she passed 
trustingly into promised rest." 

Abram Cronk. — The family of this name were among the 
early Dutch settlers of Westchester county, and are probably 
descended from Siebert Cronk, the first of the name which 
appears. 

Abram Cronk was born October 29th, 1799, and died April 26th, 
1S71. He married Billecha, daughter of Kobert Wixson, who 
was born February 20th, 1S05, and died March 1st, 1884. Their 
children were : Joseph A., born October 3d, 1841, and died un- 
married August 14th, 1866; Mary, wife of Henry J. Pierce; 
Tamar, born September 14th, 1831, and married Isaac D. Bar- 
rett; Hannah J., wife of Frederick J. Wardell; and Susan E., 
born July 22d, 1833, and died unmarried February 16th, 
1872. 

Abram Cronk, the father of this family, was a resident of Red 
Mills, and daring a long life was an earnest memlier of the 
church, and known to the community as a good man and useful 
citizen. By his death the Baptist society lost one of its bright- 
est members and one who was foremost in all good works. 

Cornelius Dean.— Richard Dean, who was an early resident 
near Red Mills, was a soldier in the Revolution, and was killed 
at the stormingof Stony Point. His wife was Susan Ward, and 
their only child was Richard, who was born September 10th, 
1771. He married, August 27th, 1794, Althea. daughter of Smith 
Austin, who was born' January 17th, 1777. The children of this 
marriage were: Anne, born August 19tli, 179.), married Uriah 
Hill; John, l)oi-n October 17th. 1797; Mary, born March l.")th, 
1800, married William Alley; Smith A., born March 10th, 1802, 
died in Kane county. 111., 1849; Stephen D., born January 13th, 
1804 (he went in 1849 on an overland journey to California, and 
was never heard from afterward); Ada, born March 28th, 1806; 



376 HISTORY OF PUTXAM COUNTY. 

Ira W., born July 3d, 1SU9, died in Buffalo in 1853; Amzi L., 
born September 5th, 1811; Cornelius, born Januarj^ 13th, 1814; 
Lewis A., born July 9th, 1816, now living in Aurora, 111.; and 
William A., died in 1854. 

Anizi L. Dean was a very prominent citizen of the town. He 
was supervisor in 1854, and ckrk of the board of supervisors for 
many years. He married Catharine, daughter of Joshua Louns- 
bury, June 4th, 1836, and had three sons: Joshua L., Adrian 
H., and William A., who are now living at Lake Mahopac. 

Cornelius Dean was born at Red Mills. January 13th, 1814, 
and received his early education in the public school of the vil- 
lage. He was elected supervisor of Carmel in 1850, and has held 
other town offices. He has always been intimately connected 
with the political affairs of the democratic party. 

The homestead farm on which Mr. Cornelius Dean now lives, 
is situated southeast from Lake Mahopac and not far from the 
Westchester county line. This farm was originally owned by 
Abraham Mabie, who lived on it many years before the Revolu- 
tion, and afterward bought it from the commissioners of for- 
feiture. He sold it to Stephen Crane, who conveyed it to John 
Carpenter, and he sold it to James S. Horton, March 4th, 1816. 
It was sold by Silas Slawson and others, assignees of James S. 
Horton, to Richard Dean in 1825, and from him it descended to 
its present owner. The old house built by Abraham Mabie, stood 
on the west side of the road opposite the present residence. A 
rough stone marked "A. M. 1765," is still preserved from the 
old house, and gives the initials of its owner and the time of its 
erection. The present residence of Mr. Dean was built by John 
Carpenter about the beginning of the present century. 

Mr. Dean was coroner for the period of sixteen years, and 
also held the office of assessor and commissioner of highways. 
He held the rank of lieutenant colonel of militia of the State in 
1838, and he was captain of a company under Governor Marcy. 
For twenty years he has been director of the Farmers' and 
Drovers' Bank of Somers, Westchester county. He is a con- 
tributing member of the Presbyterian church at Red Mills. 

The old house in which Richard Dean lived at Red Mills has 
been toi'u down, within the last few months. It stood on the 
north side of the road at the point where it turns south, and 
immediately north of the store now occupied by M. F. Agor. 
This old house, with its stone chimney, was the last relic of the 




G-^'-^iy^'T-^-^Li 



<c^^ .:2:>£'^L^tL_ 



TOWN OF CARMEL. 377 

past in the neighljorhood. The executors of W. H. Johnston 
sold to Richard Dean, in 1829, a tract of 90 acres, beginning on 
tlie west side of the road from "Red Mills to John Beyea's, thence 
running westerly to Orin Agors line (now W. B. Hazletons), 
then northerly to school house lot, and along the highway to 
the corner of the Mill farm opposite the house of W. H. Sloat 
(near Baptist Parsonage), thence easterly across the meadow to 
first named road. 

Alotso- Dean.— Jotham Dean came from Westchester 
county about the time of the Revolution. He died about 1836 
at the age of So. His children were: William, Amos, Jonathan, 
Kancy, wife of James Welch; Elizabeth, wife of Alexander 
Ganong; Zippa, wife of Robert Powers; and Jemima, wife of 
Stephen Craft. 

Amos Dean died November loth, 1862, aged 92. He married 
Rhoda Mead. Their children were: Julia, wife of Henry Knapp; 
Ada, wife of John Beam; Mary, wife of William Pinckney; 
Eliza and Sylvester. 

Mr. Alotson Dean was born August 11th, 1805, on the old 
homestead on the west shore of Lake Gilead, and from this 
family the lake gained the name of " Dean's Pond "" in olden 
time. His early life was passed on the small farm which his 
father owned. This farm his father exchanged for a farm 
owned by Reuben Ganong; but after a few years the old home- 
stead came back into his hands, and on this place Mr. Dean 
has lived all his life. To the original farm of thirty acres he 
added forty more, and afterward sold the north portion to Ben- 
jamin Bailey for as much as the whole originally cost. The 
summer boarding house of James Wixsom stands upon it. 

By strict economy and superior management. Mi-. Dean has 
accumulated a comfortable fortune, and is regarded as one of 
the most successful business men of the town. Among other 
property he owns the /"Masonic Hall" in Croton FaHs. and 
stores iu the village of Brewster. 

Mr. Dr^an married Marinda, daughter of Nathan Field, Octo- 
ber 21st, 1834. Their children are: Sarah F. H., wife of Ira T. 
Fowler; Anna M., wife of Howard D. Ganong; and Georgianna, 
wife of Winfield S. Harris of Croton Falls. 

The home of Mr. Dean is beautifully situated on the west 
shore of Lake Gilead, which is one of the most beautiful sheets 



378 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

of water in the county. For forty years both he and his wife 
have been active and zealous members of the Carrael Baptist 
Church and supporters of the society. His success in life has 
not depended npon wealth inherited from his ancestors, but has 
been gained by care, economy and skill, with the assistance of 
a wife who had been his able and efficient helpmeet. His father 
began life with the small capital of sixty dollars, and left a 
large fortune, accumulated by care and economy. 

Lewis Ludington. the sixth son and the youngest of the 
twelve children of Col. Henry Ludington, of Revolutionary 
memory, was born June 25th, 1786, in Fredericksburg, Dutch- 
ess (now Putnam) county, N. Y. The name of the township 
was subsequently changed to Kent. The education which he 
received was obtained at the district schools, no other having 
been in existence in that section of the country until the erec- 
tion of the academy in the village of Patterson at a later 
period, for which his father. Col. Ludington, contributed the 
timber. 

On the 6th of May, 1806, in company with his brother, Fred- 
erick, who was four years his senior, he opened a store near 
their father's house, upon the homestead property, and began 
a partnership which continued uninterruptedly for over thirty 
years. 

Lewis was married to Polly, the daughter and oldest child of 
Samuel Townsend, and for several years lived in a small cottage 
adjacput to the homestead of his father in Kent, from whence 
he removed to the village of Carmel, in the spring of 1816, 
where he soon afterward bought the property still owned and 
occupied by some members of the family. In the fall of 1855, 
he completed and removed to the commodious house which is 
yet the family home. The timbei- for this house — selected Nor- 
way pine— also the pine lumber of which -it was constructed 
were cut on the lands of Mr. Ludington, in Wisconsin, sawed 
in his mill in Oconto, and by a singular coincidence were shipped 
to Buffalo on the schooner "Lewis Ludington," and thence on 
a boat of the same name by the Erie Canal and Hudson River, 
to Mott Haven, from whence they were brought by the Harlem 
Railroad to Croton Ealls, in the autumn of 1854. 

Owing to the limited opportunity for business enterprise in 
Putnam county, 'Mr. Ludington, in company with his nephew, 




J^Z^^k^ ^ 



^^m^^.^ 



TOWX OF CAKMEL. 379 

Harrison Lndington, late governor of Wisconsin, and Harvey 
Burchard, a resident of Carmel, started, October 19tli, 1838, for 
Milwaukee, to examine into tlie resources and opportunities for 
business in the young and growing territory. Milwaukee, then 
but a mere village, was showing signs of future jDrominence. 
During the succeeding winter the above-mentioned persons 
made one or more trips on horseback through the interior for 
the purpose of selecting government lands, of which they lo- 
cated and purchased a considerable quantity. 

In 1839 was started at Milwaukee the firm of Ludington, 
Burchard & Co., of which Lewis Ludington was the senior 
partner and Harrison Ludington, the junior. This firm was 
changed a year or so later by the retirement of Harvey Bur- 
chard, and continued under the name of Ludington & Co., 
composed of Lewis and his two nephews, Harrison and his 
younger brother. Nelson, who at a later date became the presi- 
dent of the Fifth National Bank, of Chicago. With little 
change the fii'm remained upon the same spot, one of the 
most prominent locations in the city of Milwaukee, for upwards 
of twenty years, conducting for those early days, a business of 
great magnitude, showing enterprise and sagacity, which re- 
sulted in wealth to all the participants. Connected with their 
mercantile business was a large lumbering establishment, con- 
sisting of mills at Oconto, Wis., and yards in Milwaukee. Dur- 
ing all those years the firm saw the growing importance of the 
city in which it had cast its fortunes, and of the State of Wis- 
consin, which has since become in population and influence one 
of the great commonwealths of the Republic. 

About the year 1843, Lewis Ludington bought from Colonel 
Drake, an extensive tract of land in Columbia county. Wis., 
and in July, 1844, laid out, and in August of that year recorded, 
the plat of the city of Columbus. For many years he super- 
intended and encouraged the settlement of the young town, 
assisted by his son James, who at the early age of nineteen be- 
came for some time his father's resident agent there, until the 
promotion of Mr. E. W^. Chadbourn to that position. The city 
finally grew to be a place of considerable importance and wealth. 

Thus for more than half a century Mr. Ludington continued 
to conduct these and his various other enterprises with untiring 
energy and zeal. He was influential both at home in Putnam 
county, and in Wisconsin, the chosen State of his principal 



380 HISTORT OF PUTXAM COUNTY. 

activities, always enjoying the respect and confidence of all 
wlio knew him. 

An incident occurred in the early business life of Lewis Lud- 
ington, which showed the energy for which he was always dis- 
tinguished. Together with a number of other Putnam county 
people, farmers and merchants, he went to New York by boat, 
by the way of Peekskill, with produce to sell and purchases to 
make, all expecting to return home by the river. A very sud- 
den cold snap occurred which completely closed navigation, and 
as there now remained no way of reaching home but on foot, a 
company of half a dozen decided to adopt that method without 
delay. They, therefore, late that afternoon, walked to Kings 
Bridge at the north end of the island, from whence early the 
next morning they started for home in company. A snow storm 
set in during the day and one after another of the mem became 
exhausted and gave out, the last one excepting Mr. Ludington, 
at the village of Somers, six miles below Carmel. Nothing 
daunted he kept on his journey and went five miles above Car- 
mel near " Dingees," and only one mile from his home in Kent, 
overcome with fatigue, he fell asleep in a snow drift. When 
the cold awoke him, which it soon after did, he trudged on 
home, reaching there near midnight. Though impeded by the 
snow storm he had walked forty-live miles since he started in 
the morning. 

Mr. Ludington was a member of the Whig party during its 
existence up to the time of his death, and was strongly opposed 
to slavery and to its extension He would not accept office 
though frequently urged to do so. 

His death occurred September 3d, 1857, at Kenosha, Wis., in 
the72d year of his age. He was buried in the family plat, in 
Raymond Hill Cemetery, at Carmel. His family consisted of 
his wife, Polly, who survived him over twenty- two years, and 
his children: Laura Ann, Delia, William Edgar, Eobert, 
Charles Henry, James, Lavinia Elizabeth, Emily, and Amelia. 

Chakles Hexky Ludi>'GT0n, son of Lewis Ludington, was 
born at Carmel, February 1st, 1825. His education was partly ob- 
tained at the Polytechnic School conducted by Rev. Dr. Hunter, 
atOwenville (nowCroton Falls), also at the Grammar School of 
Hugh Stocker Banks, a faithful and able instructor, held in the 
house previously owned and occupied by the celebrated "Peter 



TOWN OF CARJIEL. 3S1 

Parley" at Ridgefield, Conn., and the ^icademy at Carmel, 
nndei' Valentine Vermilyea. 

September ISth, 1S43, in his eighteenth year, Mr. Ludington 
went to New York with his father, and entered as clerk t;he 
wholesale dry goods store of Woodward, Otis & Terbell, 53 
Cedar street, near the old "Middle Dutch Church," now the 
site of the magnificent building of the Mutual Life Insurance 
Company. He remained in their employment until 1846, when 
Harrison Gray Otis of that house separated from his partners 
and formed, in company with Edward Johnes and his nephew, 
William Johnes, the firm of Johnes, Otis & Co., with whom he 
continued as salesman until January 1st, 1849. He then be- 
came a member of the importing and wholesale dry goods house 
of Lathrop & Ludington, which started business February 1st, 
at 18 Cortlandt street, N. Y., which firm was composed and or- 
ganized by Richard D. Lathrop and himself as general, and 
James W. Johnson and Charles T. Pierson as special partners. 
Undeterred by the gloomy predictions of many of the older 
merchants, this yonng house, in company with two other firms, 
crossed Broadway, leaving the time honored localities of Han- 
over Square, Pearl, William and Cedar streets behind them, 
and became the pioneers in a movement which soon completely 
changed the location and even the character of this important 
branch of business.. In consequence of their energy and enter- 
prise they met with success from the very start. After con- 
tinuing in this store for eight years they removed to a much 
larger one in Park Place, running through to Murray street, 
which they built on tlie site of the former residence of Dr. 
Valentine Mott, the name of the firm being changed to Lathrop, 
Ludington & Co., on the retirement of the special partners. 
The partners afterward included John H. Morrison, Robert J. 
Hunter and W^illiam Faxon. Their business grew during the 
War of the Rebellion and subsequently to great magnitude for 
that time, their sales ranging annually from eight to eleven 
millions, their merchandise being distributed over every part of 
the republic north of Mason and Dixon's line, from the^ltlantic 
to the Pacific Ocean, the firm possessing the respect and con- 
fidence of all the trade. Previous to the Rebellion their sales 
were not largely made to the South, and fortunately were much 
reduced in that section when the agitation first began. When 
the spirit of secession be(.'amH rampant, their names were pub- 



382 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

lisbed in the celebrated "Blacklist," or list of abolition houses, 
in the "Southern Confederacy," and other notorious papers of 
Georgia and other Southern States. This list, which was origin- 
ally composed of Bowen, Holmes & Co., Lathrop, Ludington & 
Co., and a few others, was afterward extended by many addi- 
tions until it embraced about forty of the leading houses in the 
wholesale line in New York, Philadelphia, Boston and Balti- 
more. The publication was made with the design of injuring 
or mining in the South the trade of the several firms which in 
the words of Henry C. Bowen, " Sold their goods but not their 
principles." 

Unable to go to the war himself, Mr. Ludington sent a sub- 
stitute, and he personally, and the firm of which he was a 
member, assisted by large contributions of money, the raising 
of regiments and recruits in New York and in Putnam county. 
One entire regiment was principally obtained bj- their efforts 
and means. 

The firm of Lathrop, Ludington & Co. afterward removed' to 
the elegant store 326, 328 and 330 Broadway, built on the site 
of the old Broadway Theatre, retiring from business in 1868. 
Mr. Ludington since then has continued to attend to his private 
affairs and enterprises in New York and the West. He is a 
director in a number of leading institutions in the city, trust, 
insurance and other companies, and resides at 276 Madison 
Avenue, New York, in the same house he has occupied for over 
a quarter of a century. His family consists of a wife and six 
children, three sons and three daughters. 

James Ludington, son of Lewis Ludington, was born atCar- 
mel, Putnam county, N. Y., April 18th, 1827. The first sixteen 
years of his life were passed with his parents at home, where 
every one recognized in him a lad of much promise. He en- 
joyed an academic education and was commended by his teachers 
as bright and attentive. 

In 1843, he left his books, and bidding a temporary farewell 
to the old homestead, set out for Milwaukee. Here he first 
found employment for a time in the store of Ludington & Co. 
Subsequently he accompanied his father to the spot where stands 
to-day the city of Columbus, Wis., and it .was their united 
energy and wisdom that planned and laid out the plat, and 
stimulated the earlv growth of the town. After some vears of 



TOWX OF CAiniEL. 383 

work there he returned to Milwaukee and entered upon a busi- 
ness career of marked prosperity. For two years he hehl the 
position of treasurer of the La Crosse Eailroad Company. He 
was also president of the "Bank of the West ".at Madison, 
and vice-president of the Juneau Bank at Milwaukee. His sa- 
gacity in all matters of a business nature assured success to 
every enterprise in which he was engaged. For two years he 
rendered efficient service as alderman in Milwaukee. 

In 1859, a small saw mill at the mouth of the Pere Marquette 
Eiver, Michigan, together with a large amount of adjacent pine 
land came into Mr. Ludington's possession. He had advanced 
money, upon the jDroperty at diiJerent times, and when finally he 
purchased it, he turned with enthusiasm to the new enterprise, 
and in a year or two decided to makes it the location of a town 
(the plat of which was begun in 1867), the chosen name for 
which was "Ludington." 

After consultation with Elisha Starr, who founded the " Sen- 
tinel " newspaper, in Milwaukee, he selected George W. Clay- 
ton, a man in his employ, to start a local paper at Ludington, 
which afterward became prosperous and influential. 

It was in 1873 that the town was incori:)orated as a city, re- 
ceiving the name of "Ludington" in honor of its founder. It 
has grown greatly in population and in wealth and is the west- 
ern terminus of the Flint & Pere Marquette Railway. 

Mr. Ludington's extreme liberality was exhibited whenever 
any enterprise was on foot for the improvement or advantage of 
the place. An appeal to him for assistance for a deserving ob 
ject always elicited a generous gift. In his sales of village 
property he expressly stipulated that no spiritous liquor should 
ever be sold on tlie lot in question, and he insisted vigorously 
on comj^liance with this condition. 

In 18G9, Mr.Ludington sold his entire property interest in that 
region for half a million dollars and practicallj* retired from 
business, though he still retained an interest in the newly formed 
organization named tlie "Pere Marquette Lumber Company. "" 

Mr. Ludington never married. For some years he lived at the 
Newhall House, up to the time when the building was destroyed 
by fire, and after that he removed to the Plankinton House in 
Milwaukee, Wis., where he now resides. It is always with a lively 
interest and justifiable pride that he refers to the prosperous 
citv wliich owes its existence to him. 



384 HISTOKY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

Zalmon Ludixgton, the son of Zalmon and grandson of 
Comfort Lndington, of Rombout Precinct, Dutchess county, 
who was a brother of Abigal, the wife of Col. Henry Ludington, 
was born May 12th, 1797, about one mile from the residence of 
the latter. His father lived in the same place until ISIO, when 
he removed to Western New^ York. His son, Zalmon, the sub- 
ject of this sketch, remained with friends until 1S13, when he 
went to Batavia, N. Y., to visit his mother, and while there en- 
listed in Col. Churchill's Regiment and participated in the bat- 
tle of Black Rock. In the spring of 1814 he returned to Put- 
nam county to his uncle Yale's and to Col. Henry Lndington' s, 
and assisted the firm of F. & L. Ludington, in their store in 
Kent. 

In the spring of 1816 he came with Lewis Ludingtou to Car- 
mel and aided him in opening his branch store there and re- 
mained in his employ until midsummer. In the fall of 1818 he 
went to Virginia, returning to Carmel in 1819, and again 
visited there in 1820, remaining with Lewis Lndington two 
months. 

In 1822 he married Lovila Hagan, of Preston county, Vir- 
ginia, who bore him eight children, five sons and three daugh- 
ters. Four children are now living : Mrs. M. L. Patrick, of 
Louisville, Ky.; Horace Lndington, M. D., of Omaha, Neb.; 
Brevet Col. Elisha H. Ludington, U. S. Army (retired); and 
Lieut. Col. Marshall I. Ludington, Deputy Quarter Master 
General U. S. Army, now stationed at Philadelphia, Pa. 

Four of Zalmon Ludington' s sons served as officers in the 
Union Army during the war of the Rebellion. 

In 1823 he settled in Somerset county. Pa., where he resided 
until 1842, when he removed to Uniontown, Fayette county, 
same State, and resided there until about five years ago. Since 
then he has lived with his sons, Horace and Marshall, and is now 
with the latter in Philadelphia. Although in his S9th year he 
is still hale and hearty, remembers all about his boyhood days 
in Kent and Carmel, and only a year ago made an address in 
Philadelphia which was extensively published. 

Deacox Aaron Ganong was born in Carmel, Putnam county, 
January 3d, 1S09, on the farm where his son, Chauncey B., now 
resides, and which has been the homestead proper for about 
eighty-five years. 



Towx uF ('ai;mkl. , 3S5 

His fatlier, Alexander, a farmer, was a resident of the 
county as were also his parents. He died August 4th, 1842, 
aged 6-i. 

Aaron Ganong was educated at the common schools. His 
early years were spent on the farm. The first money that he 
earned for himself was five hundred dollars that he made as a 
musician in the employ of a prominent show firm, at the age of 
eighteen years. He pursued the occupation of a farmer until 
1861, when he removed to the city of New York, with his wife, 
and engaged in the sale of milk at retail, shipped from his 
farm and others in Putnam county. 

In 1876 he returned to Putnam county and located in Carmel 
village, where he continued to reside until his death, which oc- 
curred August 1st, 1SS3. He is buried in the Baptist cemetery 
in Carmel. 

At the age of twelve years he became a member of the Baptist 
church at Carmel, which he attended before and after his resi- 
dence in New York. On locating in New York he and his wife 
became constituent members of the Trinity Baptist Church, 
which they largely assisted. He was also elected deacon by 
this church, and acquired the title by which he was familiarly 
distinguished from many others of the same family name. By 
the Trinity Baptist Church of New York, he was presented 
with a testimonial of their esteem, in the form of an engrossed 
letter, as follows : 

" To our beloved bi'other, Deacon A. Ganong, we the mem- 
bers of the Trinity Baptist Church and congregation, of the 
city of New York beg to express to you, first our admiration 
for the character God has given you ; second, our high appre- 
ciation of your wisdom in council, your liberality in giving, and 
your constancy in attending the meetings of the church; you 
have not only contributed habitually and generously of your 
money, but it is believed that you have attended more of our 
meetings than any other member living or dead; third, we ex- 
press all our hearty. Christian love for your amiable wife, with 
sympathy quite in harmony with yinir own; she seems never 
to have discouraged you in making sacrifices for the church of 
Ciirist; finally we express to you both our sincere re.o-ret that 
you are about to remove from among us and an earnest hopi^ 
that our heavenly Father will soon turn your footsteps hither- 



386 HISTORY OF PUT:^-A5r corisTy. 

ward again, and cause you to dwell among us to the end of your 
days. Vew York City, January 6th, 1878. 

" J.^MES B. Simmons, Pastor.'' 

He was a good citizen and a successful business man, esteemed 
by all who knew him. November 17th, 1831, he married 
Amanda Ballard, of Carmel, daughter of Selah and Melinda 
Ballard. In her he found a worthy helpmeet, who assisted him 
in all the efforts of his life. Mrs. Ganong became a member of 
the Mr. Carmel Baptist Church, at about twenty years of age. 

Their oldest child is Chauncey B., born October 3d, 1832, and 
who now resides on the homestead farm. He married, January 
16th, 1856, Jane C. Kelley of Carmel village, by whom he has 
three children: Emma K., married to Volentine H. Massey, de- 
ceased; Annie L., married to Henry C. Wilson; and Francis J., 
at home. Chauncey B. Ganong is a farmer and is a member of 
the Mt. Carmel Baptist Church, of which he is clerk and for 
many years has been a deacon. 

Christopher C, the second son, was born August 21st, 1839, 
and died in his fourteenth year, February 2d, 1853, esteemed 
by all that knew him. 

The grandfather of Deacon Aaron Ganong was Jesse Ganong. 
He had four sons: Alexander, Isaac, Daniel and Gilbert. Jesse 
Ganong, with two of his sons, Isaac and Gilbert, went to the 
western part of the State. Alexander Ganong married Eliza- 
beth Dean. Their children were; Joseph, Deacon Aaron, and 
Mary, wife of 0. H. Cole. 

Leonard Yeamans. — Johnston Y'eamans, with his brothers, 
John and Abraham, are said to have been among the settlers 
who came from Cape Cod. John went to Canada after the Revo- 
lution and 2\.braham settled in Westchester county. 

Johnston Yeamans married a daughter of Thomas Wilson. 
Their children were: John, Johnston, Ampelias, Epenetus, Hes- 
ter, wife of Elihu Haines, and Martha, wife of Stephen Haines. 

Of this family Johnston Y^'eamans, the second son, was born 
August 9th, 1785. He married Phebe, daughter of Isaac Pierce. 
They were the parents of four children: Leonard, Jarvis, Eme- 
line and Eveline. 

Leonard Yeamans was born June 16th, ISll, at the old home- 
stead of his grandfather which was at Drewville, and situated 
on the farm nu\v owned bv William H. Drew. About ISlo his 






^ 



?<^^ 



TOWX OF CARMEL. 3S7 

father buiJt the house in which Mr. Yeamans now resides, and 
with his family removed to it and made it his home till the time 
of his death. The farm was purchased by Mr. Johnston Yea- 
mans from Frederick Philipse in ISlo. That tract was 65 acres 
and was part of a farm which his father held as a tenant of 
Frederick Philipse, and is situated on the road from Carmel to 
Croton Falls about a mile and a half north of the county line. 
Mr. Johnston Yeamans died June 4th, 1S48, and rests in the 
Baptist cemetery at Carmel. 

Mr. Leonard Yeamans passed his early days on the paternal 
homestead till the time of his marriage to Miss Almira Hopkins, 
daughter of Enos Hopkins, a representative of an old family 
in Carmel. They were married December 15th, 1847, and Mr. 
Yeamans then settled on a farm formerly owned by his mater- 
nal grandfather, Isaac Pierce, now in possession of Frank 
Sm alley. 

On this place he remained four years, then removed to a farm 
in Westchester county, where he lived several years, and re- 
turning to this county, lived on the farm of his father-in-law, . 
near Cole's Mills, for six years. 

By a strange coincidence his brother and sisters, who were 
living on the homestead of his father, and both of his own chil- 
dren died within a space of three weeks in the year 1865. He 
then removed to the home of his childhood and has continued 
there till the present time. 

He has made agriculture the business of his life, having no 
connections with public or political affairs. For nearly fifty 
years he has been connected with the Baptist church at Carmel, 
of which he is an active and zealous member, and lie is one of 
the deacons of the society. 

A few words may be added concerning the other branches of 
the family. Ampelias Yeamans married Abigal, daughter of 
Isaac Pierce, and had three daughters: Jane, wife of Joel Frost 
(son of Hon. Joel Frost, this first surrogate of the county, and 
now living in Illinois); Phebe, wife of Husted Halstead of 
Salem; and Clarissa. Ampelias Yeamans died February 22d, 
1853. aged 74. 

Epenetus Yeamans left three children: Jane, wife of Horace 
Haines; Betsy, wife of Worden Kelly; and Delana, wife of 
James Lawi-ence. of Katonah, Westchester county. Epenetus 
Yeamans died Aua-ust 19th. 1850, aged 75. 



388 HISTORY OF PL'TXAM COUNTY. 

Enos Hopkins was a son of Jeremiah Hopkins, whose home- 
stead was at Cole's Mills in Kent. He married Cynthia, daughter 
of Joseph Cole, and their children were: Eliza, wife of Ansel 
Hazen; Ruth, wife of Horace Cole; Antha, wife of Owen Cole; 
Rebecca, William H., Erastus, and Almira. wife of Leonard 
Teamans, all of whom are now living except Mrs. Owen Cole. 

Mr. Yeamans died April 6th, 1S86. 

The Badeau Family. — John Badeau, who was born in New 
Rochelle, in 1699, was probably the son of Elias Badeau, who 
was a French Huguenot, and one of the original settlers in New 
Rochelle, their place of rehige. 

John Badeau, who died in 1787, at the age of 88, was the 
father of four children: Peter, who died August 9th, 1816, aged 
88, came to Red Mills, Putnam county, in 1775; Elias; John; and 
Fanny, wife of Isaac Contant. 

Peter Badeau married Catharine Contant. She died in Feb- 
ruary, 1790, aged 64. Their children were: Peter, born 1749) 
removed to Albany, N. Y.; Isaac, born May 13th, 1750, died 
'September 7th, 1842; John, born February 8th, 1752, lived near 
Peekskill; Elias, born July 13th, 1755, lived at Troy, N.Y.; Ja- 
cob, born April 12th, 1757, lived in Westchester county; Cathar- 
ine, born August 12th, 1759, married Isaac Heroy; James, born 
May 13th, 1761, died young; Magdalen, born November 4t.h, 
1763, married James Heroy; David, born April 14th, 1765, died 
young; AYilliam, born September 15th, 1767, died in 1860 in 
Port Byron, N. Y. ; Isaiah, born April 2d, 1770, lived in New 
York city. 

Isaac Badeau, the second son of this family, married Susannah, 
daughter of Henry Contant, of New Rochelle. She was born 
December 14th, 1753. Their children were: Peter, born May 29th, 
1776; Henry, born January 17th, 1778, died 1868; William, born 
June 24th, 1780; Isaac, born September 2d, 1782, died young; 
Gilbert, born March 23d, 1785; Elizabeth, born October 10th. 
1787, married AYilliam Pierce; Elias, born 1789, died young; 
Fanny, born August 18th, 1791, died unmarried; Isaac, born 
March 17rh, 1794; John, born December 16th, 1797. 

Heni'y Badeau, the second son of the above family, man-ied 
Elizabeth, daughter of John Contant. Their children were: 
John Henry, born February 29fh, 1808, now living at Red Mills, 
Putnam county, N. Y.; Peter C, born 1819, now living in Brook- 




dj^6^^ 



TOWN" OF CAl'.MEL. 389 

Ivn, N.Y.; William Smith, born in 1S19, also living in Brooklyn. 

Gilbert Badeau, the fifth son of Isaac, married Mary Price, 
and had children: Isaac, now living at Lake Mahopac; Seles, 
Jonathan. Harrison, Susannah, and Adeline, wife of Edgar 
Eogers. 

■ William Badeau, the third son of Isaac, had a son, Nicholas, 
who is the father of Gen. Adam Badeau, a distinguished officer 
of the late war, and author of the "Military History of Gen- 
eralU. S. Grant." 

John Badeau, the ancestor of this family, came from New 
Rochelle with his son Peter, and settled at Red Mills in 177.5. 
Here they held a farm on the Roger Morris Lot as tenants until 
after the Revolution. 

Peter Badeau built a house where the residence of Isaac Pierce 
now stands. His son, Isaac, built his house on the present site 
of the Presbyterian church. In April, 17S2, John Hathorn and 
Samuel Dodge, the commissioners of forfeiture, sold to Peter 
Badeau the farm which he then held. 

It was described as " beginning at a butternut sappling, on 
the northeast side of a brook coming out of Healey's pond, at 
the mouth of a small run of water, where it emptied into the 
same, and is corner to farm 18, thence N. 78 degrees, E. 16 
chains, 40 links to a hickory tree, thence S. 89, 30 E., 39 chains, 
75 links, to line of farm 15, then south by the same, IS chains, 
69 links, to an elm tree on west side of a small brook, and down 
the same to Stillwater river, down the Stillwater river to the 
mouth of Healey pond brook; then up the same to the corner 
of farm 6; then North 10, 15 East, 10 chains, 33 links to a chest- 
nut tree by the side of brook, then up the same to place of be- 
ginning containing 217 acres."' 

This farm included all the land in the vicinity of the Presby- 
terian church. Peter Badeau gave the land for the church, and 
his son Isaac, the land for the parsonage. 

Isaac Badeau purchased and resided on a farm adjoining his 
father, and with him he subsequently lived. After a residence 
here for 50 years, he died on this homestead, which was later 
purchased by William Pierce, who married his daughter Eliza- 
beth. 

After the decease of Mr. Pierce it went to his children Wil- 
liam, Isaac, Cordelia, and Hannah. Cordelia married John H. 
Baldwin, and the place now belongs to her. 



390 HISTORY OF PUTNAir COUNTY. 

John Henry Badeau, the present representative of the family, 
the son of Henry, and grandson of Isaac Badeau, was born in 
the city of New York, February 29th, 1808. His parents then 
resided at what is now the corner of 9th street and 4th avenue. 
He and his brothers engaged in business as grocers; their place of 
business being on the site of the present well known dry goods 
store of Lord Taylor. After many years of very successful 
business, they retired with a competency, leasing the premises 
to Lord & Taylor in 1869. 

Mr. Badeau then came to Red Mills where he has since made 
his home. His residence is on a portion of the original Badeau 
farm, and was greatly enlarged by him in 1869. Upon this 
place the family now live, good and worthy representatives of 
the Huguenot ancestors who came here long years ago. Mr. 
Badeau married Cordelia, daughter of William Pierce, to 
whom we are indebted for much valuable information in rela- 
tion to the family. 

The Hazen Fajiily. — This family is descended from John 
Hazen, who lived in Norwich, Connecticut, and was born March 
23d, 1683. His son, Caleb, was born April 4th. 1720, and mar- 
ried Sarah, daughter of Deacon Eleazar Hamblin. She was 
born in 1721, and died in 1814. Caleb Hazen, with his wife and 
father-in-law, came to what is now the town of Carmel in 1740, 
and settled on what has ever since been called " Hazen Hill," 
on the south side of Croton River, about a mile and a half 
southwest of the village of Carmel. Caleb died March 5th, 
1777, leaving seven children: Sarah, wife of Isaac Merritt; 
Charity, wife of Elisha Cole; Abigail, wife of Abel Smith; 

Mercy, wife of Mead; Caleb, born November 7th, 1749, 

died March 31st, 1806; Eleazar, born 1755, died September 20th, 
1793; Moses, born February, 1758, died January 20th, 1834. 

Caleb Hazen, 2d, married Ruth, daughter of William Wright. 
She was born in 1751 and died in 1828. Their children were : 
Joshua, born December 12th, 1771, died April 17th, 1840 ; Jf)hn, 
born July 17th, 1773, died February 11th, 1813; Thomas, born 
April 6th, 1775, died April 15th, 1853 ; Aaron, born June 26th, 
1777, died July 9th, 1837; Caleb, born November 7th, 1779, died 
March 3d, 1858; Elizabeth, wife of James Kniffen, born 1781, 
died 1840; Hosea, born October Sth, 1784, died May 22d, 1842; 
Sabina, born 1788, died unmarried 1826; Zillah, wife of Ira 




Sh^, 



i^g*>T_y 



TOWN OF CARTEL. 39 1 

Crane, born August 2d, 1791, died November 27tli, 1851- Mentor 
W., born July 27th, 1795, died February 16th, ISSl. 

Thomas Hazen, the third child of the above'family, lived on 
the old homestead at; Hazen Hill, and married AnnaVdauo-hter 
of Jesse Smith, November 10th, ISOl. She was bor'n in 1785 
and died in 1868. Their children were : Enos, born November 
5th, 1802, died June 11th, 1875; Anson and Ansel (twins) born 
August 13th, 1807; Emily, wife of James Harvev Eeed' born 
March 28th, 1811; Augustus, born February 10th, 1815, died 
March 1st. 1886; Adeline, wife of Benjamin Wright, born 1819 
died 1861. 

Enos Hazen, son of Thomas Hazen, married Nancy, daughter 
of Jeremiah Wilson, November 23d, 1825. Their children vvere : 
Thomas W., born 1827; Mary A., wife of Peter B. Barrett; 
Leonard, who died unmarried; George E.; Truman S.; Emily J • 
Sarah E., wife of Howard E. Barrett; Fanny; Adeline, wife of 
Alonzo W. Hadden; and Jeremiah W., born September 27th, 
1845, the present sheriff of Putnam county. 

Anson Hazen, son of Thomas, married Hannah Townsend. 
He died December 21st, 1877. The only children who left issue 
were Jerome, whose son Calvert now lives in Carmel, and Carrie, 
wife of William H. Baxter, who, with her mother, inherited 
and lives on the old homestead at Hazen Hill. 

Ansel Hazen died in 1844. He left children: Lieutenant 
Charles F., who died at Harper's Ferry, Va., in 1863; Byron, 
and Zillah, first wife of Joseph G. Cole. 

Augustus, son of Thomas, has been for many years super- 
visor of Carmel, and justice of the peace. He was county clerk 
one term and deputy for many years. 

Mentor W. Hazen was born and I)rought up on the old home- 
stead at Hazen Hill, and remained there till he was married to 
Miss Rachel, daughter of Obed Cole, October 1st, 1817. He 
then removed to a farm in the town of Kent, which is now a 
portion of the "County House farm." He lived there a few 
yeai's, and then returned to the old homestead. After staying 
there one yeai' he bought a farm which now belongs to Ja'mes 
Wright. He lived on this place about si.x years and then ex- 
changed it for a fai'm farther south. In 1840, he purchased a 
farm of 60 acres of Charles Agor. This farm lies east from 
Lake Maliopac, the line between the Philipse and Morris Lots 
being the western boundary, and on this he continued to live 



392 IIISTOKY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

till the time of his death which occurred February 16tli, ISSl. 
Mr. Hazen left two sons: Henry C, who is now living in Chi- 
cago, and Orson, whose portrait is apr)ended. 

Orson Hazen was born November ISth, 1820, and lived with 
his lather till he died, when he inherited the homestead where 
he now lives. To this farm he has added by purchasing a farm 
of seventy acres, which formerly belonged to Arvah Pierce. 
Mr. Hazen has made agriculture the business of his life, and 
his care and skill have made his farm one of the finest and best 
cultivated in the town. Without taking any active part in 
politics he has held the office of commissioner of highways. 
He married Phebe, daughter of James Carver, February 11th, 
1852. 

Their children are Francis A., and Arthur C, born January 
30th, 1861. Mrs. Hazen died January 29th, 1870, at the age 
of 49. 

Arthur C. Hazen married Carrie D., daughter of Ira T. 
Fowler, March 4th, 18S5. 

Mr. Mentor W. Hazen was a soldier in the war of 1812, and 
Avas stationed with the troops at Harlem Heights. 

The homestead on "Hazen Hill" (105 acres) was leased to 
Caleb Hazen by Mrs. Margaret Ogilvie (widow of Philip 
Philipse), May 27th, 1798, for a rent of 20 Spanish milled dol- 
lars. Frederick Philipse afterward leased to Caleb Hazen 98 
acres, including his homestead, for S30 yearly. The premises 
were sold to Thomas Hazen by Samuel (rouverneur and wife, 
daughter of Frederick Philipse, February 1st, 1834. 

Jeremi.vh W. Hazen, sou of Euos and Xancy (Wilson) 
Hazen, was born on his father's homestead (now the farm of 
Robert Kelly, near Gahn's school house in the western part of 
Carmel), September 10th, 1845. When a child lie removed with 
his parents to a farm in the southeastern part of the town 
of Kent. At the breaking out of the War of the Rebellion, 
Mr. Hazen, though still a boy, was seized with military 
enthusiasm, and ran away from home to enlist in Company E, 
38th Regiment, N. Y. S. Y., May 15th, 1861. He was honor- 
ably discharged October 10th of the same year on account of 
sickness contracted in the service. After returning from the 
army he was employed witli Yan Amburg it Co.'s menagerie 
for three years from 1863 to 1866. While thus employed he 



TOWX OF CAli.MKL. 393 

travelled tlii'ougli the New England and the Western States. 
At the close of this engagement Mr. Hazen returned to his farm 
and has ever since, except when engaged in otficial duties, been 
a resident of the town of Kent. After holding various town 
offices such as collector and assessor, he received the republican 
nomination for the office of sheriff of the county and was duly 
elected in the fall of 1SS3. He then removed to Carmel, where 
he now resides 

Mr. Hazen married Miss Mary, daughter of George Doughty, 
January lOth, 18G6. They are the parents of three children: 
Hobart Ward, Enos Ehvood, and Nellie G. 

Sheriflf Hazen is justly regarded as one of the most popular 
citizens of the county, and has never failed to prove faithful to 
his official dnties. 

TiiK Gkegouy Family.— In 1762 Russell Gregory, Timothy 
Gregory and Kev. Elnathan Gregory were living on farms on 
Lot No. 6. They are supposed to have been brothers. 

Rev. Elnathan Gregory came from Norwalk, Conn. He was 
a student of Princeton College, and afterward entered the min- 
istry, and was settled pastor over Gilead Cliurch in Carmel for 
many years. He lived on a large farm opposite the old church 
and burying ground at Q-ilead. He died in 1S16 at the age of 
90, and is buried by the church where he preached so long, but 
no tombstone marks his resting place. 

He left a son, Daniel, born in 1752, and died November 13th, 
1817, aged 65. Daniel married Elizabeth, daughter of William 
H. Seeley. She died October 12th, ISil, aged 82. They had 
children: Ezra, Samuel, Horace, Lewis, James, Elnathan, Alva, 
Hannah (wife of John Crane), and Polly (wife of Michael Sloat). 

Horace Gregory was born in 1792 and died December 9tb, 
1863. He married Elizabeth, daughter of William H. Seeley, 
and their children were: Mary, wife of Isaac Hill; Elizabeth, 
wife of Harrison Marion; and Daniel, who is now pi-esident of 
Lake Forest University, 111. 

Lewis Gregory (born 1787 and died March 27th, 1819) left a son. 
Dr. Lewis H. Gregory, born December 21th, 1818, died June 
19th, 1882, who was a very prominent citizen of Carmel and 
largely interested in real estate at Lake Mahopac, and owner of 
the popular '-Gregory House." He left one daughter, Lucena. 
wife of Josei)h G. Cole. 



394 HISTORY OF PUT:N'A5r COUXTY. 

James Gregory married Esther, daughter of Ebenezer Gannng, 
and had chiUiren: Dr. Ebenezer, Abel and George. The last 
married Elizabeth Byington, and left a son, Charles, who is now- 
living near Croton Falls. 

The homestead of Daniel Gregory was the place now owned 
by Mrs. Anna Baker, wife of Lewis Baker, on the road from 
Lake Mahopac to Croton Falls, a short distance north of the 
junction of Broad Brook and Croton River. 

Here, on the former stream was "Gregory's Mills," where 
quite a business was done in former times, and where a new mill 
has lately been built. 

On the premises is a neglected family burying ground, where 
rests Daniel Gregory and his son, Lewis. 

The Austin Family. — Jonathan Austin, the ancestor of this 
family, is said to have come to this part of the country from 
Rye, Westchester county, many years before the Revolution, 
and died previous to 1777. His wife. Charity Odell, survived 
him several years. Their children were: Jonathan, Smith,- Job, 
Robert, Isaac, Anna (wife of Sebbeus Howe), and Rebecca. 

Of these children, Jonathan, the oldest, married Sarah Slack. 
He moved to Dutchess county and left a son, David, and other 
children. 

Smith Austin married Martha Brewer, and had four children: 
Robert, Absalom, Hettie (wife of James Barker), and Althea 
(wife of Richard Dean). 

Robert Austin married first, Elizabeth Lane. Their children 
were: James, Amos L., George, Absalom, Nathan L., Mary, 
Phebe, Adah (wife of Orin Agor), Eleanor (wife of Anthony 
Stokura), Nancy (wife of Hiram Kniffen). 

Isaac Austin married Ann Currey. They were the parents of 
five children: Jonathan, Job C, Locke, Charity and Mary. 
These families have many descendants in this county. 

Job Austin was born March 31st, 1759, and died February 
7th, 1847, at the age of SS. He married Mary Nelson, who was 
born April 21st, 1758. After her decease, wjiich occurred Sep- 
tember 18th, 1793, he married Hannah, widow of Eleazar Hazen, 
who was born in 175.5, and died December 13th, 1839. Job 
Austin had three children: Silas, Sarah (wife of Cornelias 
Tompkins), and Mercy (wife of Peter CrookstonV 

Silas Austin was born May och, 1780. He married in 1805, 




t^ 



^Xo . ^ytudic^ 



TOAVN OF CARMEL. 395 

Elizabeth, daughter of Nathaniel Tompkins. They were parents 
of eleven children: Jacob, iS'elson, Eleazar, Nathaniel, Mary 
(wife of Peter Anderson), Sarah, Jane (wife Harrison Agor), 
George, Phebe, Amos L., and one child, Mercy, who died at the 
age of five years. Silas Austin died December 9th, 1841. His 
wife survived him and died July 2Gth, 1857. The four older 
sons removed to Kendall county, Dlinois, where their families 
are now living. 

Amos L. Austin, the youngest child, and the representative 
of this family in Putnam county, was born June 10th, 1827. 
He married Cynthia, daughter of Levi Cole, and granddaughter 
of Deacon Daniel Cole, who is well known in the annals of 
the Baptist church in this portion of the country. Their 
children are: Elizabeth, wife of La Fayette Pinckney; Silas, 
Levi C, IS'elson, Mila and Theodore. Of these children, Silas, 
the eldest son, married Abigail, daughter of Ebenezer Barrett, 
and has two children, Henry and Mila. Levi C. married 
Susan, daughter of Jonathan Smith, and their children are 
Amos and Cynthia, twins. 

Job Austin was a soldier in the Kevolution and served 'dur- 
ing the war. He was engaged in the battle of White Plains 
and although a long time in active service he escaped un- 
wounded. His descendant, Mr. Amos L. Austin, now owns 
the old homestead farm which was sold to his ancestor by the 
commissioners of forfeitures, being a part of the Morris Lot. 
The first house built on this tract was of logs and stood a few 
rods west of the present residence. This was destroyed many 
years ago and a second dwelling was erected near the old site. . 
This in turn was torn down and the present dwelling house of 
Mr. Austin was built in 1835. 

Lewis Ga Nun. — The various families in this county spelling 
their names Ganung, Ganong and Ga Nun, are all doubtless de- 
scended from one ancestor, and are all of the same race. The 
family is of French origin, and were i^robably among the 
Huguenots who came to this country abobt 1686. The original 
of tiie name is believed to be Ga Nun, although only one branch 
adheres to that form. In the assessment role of 1777 several 
persons are named of this family. 

Jacob Ga Nun was born in 1748, and died December ^^d, 1834, 
at the age of 86; and is buried in the old burying ground at 



d9G HISTORY OF PUTXAM COUXTY. 

Gilead. He was probably a son of Joseph Ga Nun. His home- 
stead was a farm in the south part of Carmel, and is now owned 
by Stephen Voris. He married Hannah Wilson, who died May 
22d, 1845, at the age of 92. Their children were: Jonathan, who 
settled in New York; Daniel, who married Adah, daughter of 
Reuben Ga Nun (his son, Janet Ga Nun, now lives near Union 
Valley); Thomas, who left three sons: Horton, a list of whose 
descendants are here given: James, who lived in Westchester 
county; Joseph, born 1778, died May 24th, 1836 (He and his 
wife Susannah are buried at Gilead burying ground); Hannah, 
wife of Marcus Sloat; Polly, wife of Sturgis Downs; Nancy, 
wife of Green Thorn; and Plieba. 

Horton Ga Nun died in 1836, aged 50 years, 1 month and 8 
days. He married Urania Dean and by this marriage had two 
sons, Lewis and James. Mr. Ga Nun was married a second time 
to Jane, daughter of Thomas Wilson, and the children of this 
marriage were: Leonard and Augusta J., wife of Osmond 
Ballard. 

Lewis Ga Nun, the subject of this sketch, was born near 
Union Valley in Carmel, April 4th, 1812. Shortly after his birth 
his father moved to Westchester county and lived in the town 
of Somers. When he was three years old his m.other died and 
he was sent to live with his grandfather. His father, after his 
second marriage, returned to Carmel, and lived for twenty-one 
years on the farm now owned by Elbert Sloat. 

Mr. Ga Nun lived with his father till the time of his death, 
which occurred in 1836. He then began business on his own 
account. 

After living awhile in Carmel village he went to Kent, where 
he lived two years, and then returned to Carmel when he pur- 
chased his present residence of Jonathan Cole, and liere he has 
ever since made his home. He married Catharine, daughter of 
Jonathan Pierce, May 30th, 1840; she died November 9tli, 1885. 
Their children were: Horton, Barnabas C. and Mary D. 

Arriving at thirteen years of age Barnabas C. Ga Nun began 
business as a clerk irt the store of Abner Seaman. In April, 
1868, he, with his brother Horton, engaged in business on their 
own account, in a small store on the site of the north wing of 
the Smalley Hotel. 

Mr. Horton Ga Nun died July 24tli, 1869, and in 1877 Barna- 
bas purchased the store formerly occupied by Crane & Seaman, 




t^ 



/u^ 



^/u-a-x^ 



TOWN OF OAKMEL. 397 

and removed from where lie and his brother had kept a store 
for several years previous to his present location. From a small 
beginning the business has rapidly increased and Mr. Ga Nun 
is justly reckoned among the thriving and prosperous business 
men of the county. 

Thaddeus R. Ganung, who has for many years been promi- 
nently connected with the history of Lake Mahopac, was 
born November 17th. 1S29. His father, Marcus, and his grand- 
father, Abraham, were both residents of the southern part of 
the town of Carmel, the old homestead being the farm in Union 
Valley, owned by Mrs. Theodore Ganung. His early days were 
passed on the homestead, but on reaching manhood he went 
into business on his own account, first as a stone mason, but 
later as a contractor, in which he engaged extensively. 

The county clerk's office at Carmel, the Tilden House at 
Lake Mahopac, the Methodist church at Shrub Oaks, in West- 
chester county, and the library of Mr. Daniel D. Chamberlain 
are among the works executed by him. 

Mr. Ganung' s first connections with Lake Mahopac began 
in 1854. At that time he was connected with Dr. Lewis H. 
Gregory as part owner of his hotel enterprise. He remained 
with him till 1S59, and then resuming his former business as a 
contractor, he superintended the improvements on the grounds 
purchased by wealthy citizens of New York, and transformed 
the wilderness of nature into the elegance of art, and the re- 
sults of his skill are likely to be visible for long years to come. 

In 1859 Mr. Ganung purchased Fairy Island. Just before 
the time of the purchase it was covered with a thick growth of 
bushes, but a fire had swept over it and not only destroyed the 
vegetation, but actually consumed the soil itself. In former 
years the island was covered with a grovvth of lofty pines, but 
these had long since disappeared. The extent of this little 
island has been somewhat enlarged, and by his care and skill 
it has been transformed into a place which justly merits the 
name it has gained. 

The first store, and indeed the first building at the railroad sta- 
tical near Lake Mahopac, was built by Mr. Ganung in 1860. 
upon a tract of land on the south side of the road. This tract 
was afterward sold in small lots at a large advance on its 
original cost. 



398 HISTOUT OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

In 1870 Mr. Ganung purchased a large tract of land on the 
west shore of Lake Mahopac, including nearly a mile of water 
front. This he sold to the Improvement Company, but subse- 
quently it came back into his possession. 

In 1S70 Mr. Ganung, in company with Dr. Gregory, pur- 
chased the cottage and grounds of Marian De La Yarre, and 
after various transfers it has become the property of Mrs. Ga- 
nung, and by the addition of many improvements it is now 
one of the finest residences on the lake. Many of the land 
purchases of the Lake Mahopac Improvement Company were 
made through the agency of Mr. Ganung, and it is safe to say 
that there is no man who is more thoroughly acquainted with 
the inner history of that enterprise than himself. 

Mr. Ganung was married in 1858, to Miss Marianne Hudson, 
of a Lancastershire family in England and descended from the 
family of Entwisel of Rochdale. 

In the parish church of St. Chad, Rochdale, is the following 
inscription: " Here lyeth Sir Bertine Entwisel, Knight, which 
was born in Lancastershire, and was Viscount and Baron of 
Brybeke in Normandy and Bailiff of Constantin, who died 
fighting on king Henry VI. party, 28th May 1455." 
" On whose sowl Jesus have mercy." 

Robert D. Wixsom'. — About the middle of the last century, 
two brothers, Peleg and Shubael Wixsom, came from Cape Cod 
and settled in Carmel, on a farm north of Lake Mahopac. This 
farm, which extended from Long Pond to Wixsom Pond, em- 
braced 195 acres and was sold to the two brothers by the com- 
missoners of forfeiture, April 19th, 1782, and they divided it 
between them. May 11th, 1795, Shiibael taking the south part. 

Shubael Wixsom died April 11th, 1803. aged 64 years. He 
left a wife, Billeche, and six childi'en: Elijah, Barnabas, Shu- 
bael, Robert, Elizabeth and Lavina. 

Robert Wixsom was born March 2d, 1782, and died Septem- 
ber 19th, 1861, and is buried by the Baptist church at Red Mills. 
He married Anne, daughter of James Tompkins, and their 
children were: Billeche, born February 20th, 1805, married 
Abraham Cronk; Phebe, born March 10th, 1807, married John 
Wright; James T., born June 25th, 1809; Drusilla, born August 
25th, 1812: Nathaniel, born August 17th, 1814, now living near 

' Also siiellt'd ]Vij:oiii and TT7.i-o». 




w/r/rCYcf^j /I >4^A^<^^/ 



TOW>f OF CAR.MEL. 399 

Eed Mills; Mary A., born December 31st, 1816, married James 
Wright; Rachuel, born April loth, 1819; Tamar A., born De- 
cember 10th, 1820, died young; Robert Dorson, born October 
8th, 1822, died July 10th, 188,); Alpheus T., born August 17th, 
1824, deceased; and Susan E., born March 22d, 1827, married 
William Cole. 

Robert Dorson Wixson was born at the old homestead of his 
father, and his entire life was passed upon the place where he 
was born. Inheriting a large farm from his father, he made 
agriculture the principal business of his life. He also engaged 
in buying and selling horses and cattle and was one of the largest 
dealei'S in this branch of business in the country. At the time 
of the land speculations around Lake Mahopac, he sold SO acres 
of the south part of his farm to Edwin A. Saportas, for §20,000. 
For many years Mr. Wixsom was connected with town affairs 
as assessor and overseer of poor. He was a contributing mem- 
ber of the Baptist Society of Carmel, and a very liberal sup- 
porter. After a very active and useful life, Mr. Wixsom died, 
July 10th, 1885, aged 62 years, 9 months, and 2 days.. Mr. 
Wixsom married Charlotte A., daughter of James Hill, October 
12th, 1864. They were the parents of two daughters, Anna and 
Tottie, who are now living on the old homestead with their 
mother. 

Nathaniel Wixsom, brother of Robert D., married Sarah, 
daughter of John Barrett. His children are: Margaret, wife of 
Elam Barrett; John; and Susan E., wife of Sarles Drew. 

Alpheus T. Wixsom, brother of Robert D., married Amy 
Scott. His children are: James, who is living at Lake Gilead; 
Ira C, Sarah A. and Charles. 

Peleg Wixsom died about 1804, at an advanced age. He 
had a wife, Margaret, and children; James (born 1773, died 
February 18th, 1849), Joseph, Daniel, Anna (wife of John 
Russel), and Katy, wife of Isaac Austin. James Wixsom mar- 
ried Lizzie Barger and had sons, Bentley, John, and Stephen. 
Joseph Wixsom uuirried Deborah Brown and left sons, Joseph, 
Egbert and Doris. Daniel Wixsom married Sarah Ayres. His 
children were David, Reuben and Peleg. 

John Wixsom (son of James) was born March 2d, 1795, and 
died September lUth, 1870. Ee married Elizabeth, daugliter of 
Jacol) Badeau. His children were: Abram B. (born ISlOj, 
James, Edward J. (of Putnam Valley), Lewis W. (of Iowa) 



400 IIISTOIIY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

Anna E., Almira (wife of Darius Hopkins), Adeline (wife of 
Albert Wright) and William M. (born 1836). David Wixsom, 
son of Daniel, married Jennie, daughter of Jacob Tomkins, 
and had two sons, Reuben and Joshua. Reuben Wixsom, son 
of Daniel, married Irene Hopkins and had children; Bentley 
(now living in Kent), Esther, Silas and Daniel. 

Tlae farm sold by the Samuel Dodge and John Hathorn, 
commissioners of forfeiture, to Peleg and Daniel Wixsom, 
April 19th, 1782, is thus described: "All that tract beginning 
at a black oak tree, a corner to farm No. 52 and 64, thence 
runs south 2 degrees east 30 chains, 50 links, to a walnut tree 
marked, thence south 40 west 5, 74 to a white oak tree, a corner 
to farm 55, thence south 21, 30 east 13, 50 to a map)le tree by a 
pond, corner to farm 53; then along the south side of the said 
pond to the ash tree marked, a corner to farm 53; thence north 
56 east 11, 85 to farm 59, and by the same north 9 east 15, 50: 
thence north 13, 45 east 40, 30 to the long pond and thence up 
along the same to the beginning containing 193 acres." 

It would seem from this that Wixsom Pond is included in 
this farm, though the description of the Robert Hughson farm 
would also seem to include it. The farm was divided between 
the two brothers May 11th, 1795. Peleg had the north part 
described as " beginning at a black oak tree and running south 
2 degrees east 26 chains 25 links; thence east 41 chains 20 links 
to a stake, then N. 12 E. 36 CH. to Long Pond, and along the 
sam.e to place of beginning.'" This part of the farm was left 
by Peleg Wixsom to his son James, and from him it came in 
possession of his son John Wixsom. It was sold under mort- 
gage to Kelsey Agor and is now owned by Allen Adams. The 
old house of Peleg Wixsom is still standing on the farm. 

The south part of the farm which fell to Shubael Wixsom 
descended to his son Robert who added to it by buying part of 
the old Robert Hughson farm. This was the tract sold by 
Robert D. Wixsom to Edwin A. Saportas. The old house of 
Shubael Wixsom (long since destroyed; stood a short distance 
north of Wixsom Pond. . The farm descended from Robert 
Wixsom to his son Robert D. Wixsom. as previously mentioned. 

Xatiian L. Tiio^tPSON. — Among the men who came to Lake 
Maliopac in the days when agriculture was the only business 
conducted around its shores, and hotels and boarding houses, 




(0^^ 



TOWN OF CAi;.MEL. 401 

with their attendaat gaiety and fashion, were unI<:no\vn, was 
Stephen Thompson, a native of Derby, Connecticut. 

He became a resident of Carmel as early as 182'2, and pur- 
chased from William Wright a small piece of land on the shore 
of Lake Mahopac at the place where Stephen Monk afterward 
erected the first hotel. Here Mi\ Thompson established a hat 
manufactory and conducted a business that was considered 
extensive in the times when making hats by steam power had 
not come to the aid of human power. 

His son, Nathan L. Tliompson, the subject of this sketch, 
was born in Derby, Conn., March 17th, ISlo, and came to this 
place with his father when a boy. He subsequently re- 
turned to his native place whei'e he learned the trade of hat 
making. 

In 1S42 he purchased from Henry S. Baldwin a ti'act of land 
on the shore of Lake Mahopac and established his business. 

The advertisements which appeared in the local newspapers 
at that time show that Mr. Thompson was a man of energy and 
great practical knowledge, and his hat manufactory was exten- 
sive and gave employment to many men. About 18.51, Mr. 
Thompson, whose place on the lake was one of (he most at- 
tractive in the neighborhood, opened his house to the eager 
crowd of tourists who were seeking for places to pass the 
summer weather in this delightful and remote region. 

Beginning on a small scale he gradually increased his ac- 
commodations till at length his guests numbered over three 
hundred, and the reputation of the "Thompson House" was 
known far and wide. 

At a time when the house was tilled with guests and in the 
midst of a prosperous season the hotel was burned on th^ 6th of 
July, 1869, leaving nothing but smoking ruins on the place 
where so short a time before hail been the abode of comfort and 
luxury. 

Mr. Thompson, with his accustomed energy, immediately 
proceeded to rebuild and the ne::t seas(.)n a larger house, with 
superior accommodations, was waiting to receive the throng of 
guests that came again to the lake. 

At the time when the most reckless land speculation was the 
order of the day around Lake Mahopac Mr. Thompson pur- 
sued the even tenor of his way, contented with a legitimate 
l)rosper()Us l)usiness and leaving speculation to otliers less wise 
2a 



402 HISTOUY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

and in the end less successful. The natural result was that the 
"Thompson House" was about the only piece of property 
around the lake which did not go through the experience of 
mortgage foreclosure and sale. 

Mr. Thompson was a man of strictly honest principles, one 
whose word was universally known to be as good as his bond. 
Possessed of great energy and perseverance he built up a large 
and prosperous business from a very small beginning, and left 
it well established and unencumbered. 

Mr. Thompson was supervisor of the town of Carmel in 
1867-68-69. As a man of liberal views and strict integrity he 
was well known and popular and highly esteemed by all who 
knew him. 

Mr. Thompson was married in 1837 to Miss Hannah M., 
daughter of Joseph Wooster, a representative of a well known 
Connecticut family. 

After a useful and very successful life Mr. Thompson died 
December 2Sth, 1S84, and a monument of substantial and ele- 
gant simplicity marks his resting place in the cemetery by the 
Presbyterian church, at Red Mills, of which he was a prominent 
member. 

, James C. Gulick is descended on the paternal side from James 
Gulick, who fought with honor in the Revolutionary army, and 
whose ancestors came from Holland, settling on Long Island at 
an early period in American history. Previous to the war with 
Great Britain they had removed to New Jersey, where they 
took upland, a portion of which is still in possession of mem- 
bers of the family. A brother of James Gulick also fought 
with the patriot army and was killed at the battle of Mon- 
mouth. 

On the maternal side Mr. Gulick is descended from Thomas 
Galbraith, who came from Scotland and whose name was after- 
ward changed to Galbraith. Thomas Galbraith settled in 
Somerstown, Westchester county, where he married Susannah 
Finch of an old English family, originally settled in Connecti 
cut, but a few of whose members had removed to New York 
State. Thomas Galbraith also fought in the Revolution and 
was wounded, liis widow drawing a pension from the govern- 
ment till the time of her death. After the decease of her husband 






^^-^ -^ >%^ 



-\_ 



TOWN OF CAKMEL. 403 

Mrs. Calbraith came to N'ew York city with her daughter. Mili- 
ceat, who married at that place, January 6th, 1821, Isaac, a son 
of James Gulick. Mr. Gulick had taken up his residence in 
New York together with his brother, James, who was at one 
time register ol' the city and county of New York and also 
chief of the City Fire Department, holding that office at the 
time of the great tire in 1835. Isaac Gulick had three children, 
all sons, of whom James, the eldest, was born in New York. 
July 4th, 1822. 

Till his fourteenth year Mr. Gulick attended the private 
school of Mr. Kirby in the neighborhood of his home, after 
which, in 1841, he entered as a clerk the wholesale grocery store 
of Piatt Brush in West street. Here he remained six years, 
when he started in business for himself. In 1848 he admitted to 
partnership Mr. Francis H. Holmes, the firm continuing under 
the name of Gulick & Holmes till 1861, when, Mr. Holmes hav- 
ing retired, a new firm was organized, long known as Scudder, 
Gulick & Van Kleeck. In 1877, just thirty years from its or- 
ganization, the business was discontinued, the members of the 
firm retiring to private life. The history of Mr. Gulick' s busi- 
ness career would be considered remarkable in these days of 
loose business method. During its whole progress he never 
asked an extension of ti-me nor credit, and for a long period at 
its latter end he never gave a note. 

Since his retirement Mr. Gulick has spent his winters in New 
York city and his summers in his residence at Mahopac. He is 
a member of St. Paul's Methodist Church of New York city 
and is an active worker in the cause of practical religion. He 
is vice president of the Excelsior Savings Bank of New York, 
and is also a director in the New York, Standard and Globe 
Insurance Companies of that city, the latter of which he assisted 
to organize. 

Mr. Gulick has been twice married. His first wife was Mary 
A. Reid, by whom he had four children: Mary A., John C. 
Richard M., and James I. In 1879 he married for his second 
wife Mary E. Jones of New York city. Mr. Gulick is a public 
spirited and thoroughly philanthropic gentleman and his resi- 
dence in Putnam county has been productive of good results 
both to the y<jutig wli.) profit by his example and the older 
members of society who enjoy his friendship. 



404 HISTOKY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

The Miller Family.— James Miller was among the early 
settlers at Norwalk, Conn., in 1671, having come to that place 
from the early Massachusetts settlements. He is said to have 
had two brothers: Thomas who settled in Peru, Vt., and John 
who settled at Southampton, L. I., and was the ancestor of the 
families in that region. James Miller and his wife, Martha, 
were in Rye in 1681, and lived on " Budd's Neck, near the West- 
chester path." His children, so far as known, were Abraham, 
Samuel and Anthony. 

Abraham Miller was born in 1744 and died in 1794. He was 
a blacksmith by trade, and lived and died at Saw Pitts, now 
Portchester. He married Phebe, daughter of Daniel and Sarah 
(Seaman) Hawxhurst, of Rye, foi'merly of Oyster Bay, L. I., in 
1770. She was born May 30th, 1748 (O. S.), at Oyster Bay, and 
died November 23d, 1831, at Somers town. 

Abraham Miller was a preacher of the Society of Friends, and 
a companion of El ias Hicks. His children were: Daniel, born 
February 22d, 1771, died September 2d, 1841; Philadelphia, 
born August 2d, 1773, died November 13th, 1852; Elizabeths 
born 1770, died 1850; Richard, born January, 1779, died October 
3d, 1845; Charles, born November 1st, 1781, died August 29th, 
1868; John, born 1783, died 1817; Abraham, born January 
17th, 1784, died March 4th, 1847; Walter, born 1786, died 1787; 
Phebe, born 1788, died 1809; and Walter, born 1790, died 
1838. 

Abraham Miller, the seventh child of the above family, was a 
farmer and paper manufacturer, and resided at Somers, West- 
chester county. He was a member of the Society of Friends, 
and was buried at Amawalk. He married Elizabeth, daughter 
of Joseph and Jane (Cornell) Griffin, of Maraaroneck, June 
21st, 1804. She was born August 15th, 1783, and died June ISth, 
1858. Their children were: Jane G., born September 22d, 1805, 
married Henry Gee; Eliza, born August 9th, 1807, married Henry 
Carpenter; Phebe, born January 26th, 1810, married Henry 
Birdsall; Robert, born June 21st, 1812, now living in Sing Sing; 
John G., born December 23d, 1814, died March 31st, 1885; Ben- 
jamin G., born March 20th, 1819, died July 29th, 1860; Charles, 
born IMarch 23d, 1821, living in New York; Abraham H., born 
December 19th, 1S24, died March 11th, 1854; and Mai-y E., born 
March 27th, 1830. 




"C y>^-c£u^, 



TO WIS' OF CARMEL. 4U0 

Dr.« Henry F. Miller, wlio is a prominent surgeon dentist, 
was born in the city of Brooklyn, IS". Y., December 10th, 1841. 
His father, John G. Miller, who was a native of Westchester 
county, married Phebe, daughter of Isaac Carpenter, the repre- 
sentative of an old family in that part of the State. 

The children of this marriage were: William J., who died at 
the age of 33; Dr. Henry F.; Abram J., the present district at- 
torney of Putnam county; Dr. Alonzo B., of New York; Ma- 
tilda J., deceased; and Phebe, wife of James A. Foshay. After 
the decease of Mrs. Miller, Mr. Miller married Emily A. Hotch- 
kiss, and had a child, Annie C. 

The parents of Dr. Miller removed to Carmel while he was a 
child, and in the schools of this village he received his early 
education, and afterward was a student at the well-known in- 
stitute at Claverack. At the age of twenty-one he began the 
study of dental surgery under the direction of his uncle, Dr. 
Charles Miller, in New Y'ork. After completing his studies he 
commenced practice in Brewster, which he still continues, divid- 
ing his time between that village and Carmel. 

For several years he held the office of United States assistant 
assessor, in this district, and is at present one of the directors 
of the Putnam County National Bank. 

In 18S0, Dr. Miller erected his residence in the village of Car- 
mel, and makes this place his permanent home. 

Dr. Miller married Frankie E., daughter of Benjamin Travis. 
Their children are Harry Boyd and William Travis. 

In his profession Dr. Miller stands as one of its most promi- 
nent representatives in the county, and enjoys an extensive 
and increasing practice. 

He is also a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity, and 
one of the supporting members of the Presbyterian church in 
Carmel. 

Hon. Henry D. Clapp.— Among the young men who have 
established a reputation and a name in the county a prominent 
place must be given to the subject of this article. Mr. Clapp 
was born at the old homestead of his grandfather, Daniel Drew, 
at Drewville, August 16th, 1859. 

His early education was carefully superintended by a private 
tutor, and after a preparatory course at Drew Seminary, he 
entered Madison University. Upon completing his studies at 



406 HISTORY OF PUTNAII COUNTY. 

that institution he entered Columbia Law School, from \('hich 
he gradnated in 1883. 

The republican party of the county, in just recognition of his 
ability, gave him the nomination for member of Assembly in 
the county convention of 1884. This nomination was ratified 
by an election with the largest majority ever given to a member, 
defeating his opponent by a majority of 791. He was the 
youngest member ever elected from Putnam county, and upon 
taking his seat in the Legislature in January, 1885, Mr. Clapp 
Avas appointed to the committees on Judiciary and Prisons. 
During his Legislative course he took an active part in the in- 
vestigation concerning prison labor and the various questions 
arising from it, and felt an especial interest in the reform legis- 
lation for the city of New York, and was an able supporter of 
Hon. Theodore Roosevelt in his efforts to accomplish so worthy 
a design. 

Since retiring from the Legislature Mr. Clapp has been en- 
gaged in business in New York. The estate on which Mr. Clapp 
resides includes the greater portion of the old James Dickinson 
farm, of which a detailed account has been given in another 
part of this work. It has descended to him from his grand- 
father, Daniel Drew, who purchased it from the heirs of its 
former owner, Elisha Cole. One of the episodes of his boyhood 
days was the "breaking ground " for the Drew College, Octo- 
ber 1st, 1872, on which occasion he (then a boy of thirteen) 
performed the ceremony in the name of his grandfather. 

Mr. Clapp, in gratification of a refined and liberal literary 
taste, has collected a fine library which furnishes enjoyment for 
his hours of leisure which, as an active man of business, it may 
be well supposed are not numerous. 

The residence of Mr. Clapp, of which a view is presented, was 
originally built by Dr. Addison Ely, but was greatly embellished 
and enlarged to its present proportions by his respected father, 
Hev. W. S. Clapp, the improvements being designed by him 
from architectural designs which met his eye when travelling 
in Europe. 

Mr. Clapp married Miss Jessie, daughter of Stephen T. 
McMahon, of Southeast, February 17th, lS8.o. 

BiiYANT S. Palmer, a well known citizen and successful 
merchant of Carmel, was born at Long Ridge, a small village 



TOWN OF CARMKL. 407 

in the north part of the town of Stamford, Fairfield county, 
Conn., October 5th, 'lS42. He is tlie eldest of a family of two 
sons and three daughters. 

His father, Charles J. Palmer, was boi'n and reared in the 
town of Greenwich, Connecticut. His mothers maiden name 
was Margaret Scofield. She was a native of Pound Ridge, 
Westchester county. Her father, Elijah Scofield, was the 
youngest of a family of eleven children, all of whom lived to 
be over seventy-two years old. His great-grandfather, on his 
mothers side, was David Scofield, who served as a soldier in 
the Revolutionary war and was for sometime a prisoner in the 
old sugar house in New York and suffered great hardship. 

When Bryant S. was about two years of age his father pur- 
chased a farm near Stewartstowu, York county, Pa. Here 
he commenced his early education in the public schools of the 
town, helping his father with the farm work as soon as he was 
old enough. 

After living here nine years his father returned to Long Ridge. 
Here his son continued his studies at the public school and 
finally finished his education at Bedford Academy and at a 
private school in Stamford, Conn. In the fall of 1861, he took 
a trip west as far as Hlinois, and during the following winter 
taught school near Elgin in that State. Returning the next 
spring he entered the store of Whitlock Brothers at Croton 
Falls. Here he served his employers so well he was transferred 
as manager of a new store which they started at Pardy's Sta- 
tion. He continued in this position about five years when the 
business was sold out and he again went back to Croton Falls 
and became a partner of the firm of Whitlock & Co. 

In August, 1SG9, he came to Carmel and began a mercantile 
business which he still continues, increasing and improving it 
slowly each year. 

Mr. Palmer was appointed postmaster without his solicita- 
tion in August, 1S71, and held the office nearly fifteen years. 
He has been a director in the Putnam County National Bank 
since ISSO, and also one of the officers of the Putnam Agricul- 
tural Society for several years. 

He was married to Lydia A. Howes December 19th, 1S72. 
She was a daughter of William Howes, and granddaughter of 
Nafhan A. Howes, one of the pioneer circus men of the country. 

Their children are: Charles William, Gertrude, Irving Howes, 



408 IIISTOUY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

who died when six and a half years old; Robert Bryant, Addi- 
son Ely, Lewis Crosby, Mary Ida, Ralph Scofield, and Helen. 

Dr. James H. Merritt, son of David and Naomi Merritt, 
was born in Carmel, July 26th, 1828, the family from which 
he was descended being among the older settlers in the county. 
His early education was obtained at the public schools of his 
native town, and he graduated from Amenia Seminary. 

The study of his chosen profession was begun under the direc- 
tion of a dental surgeon in Fond du Lac, Wis., and finished in 
the city of New York. 

He then began the practice of dental surgery in Carmel, where 
he remained a short time, and in 1854 removed to Fond du Lac. 
In that place he remained about two years, then returned to 
Carmel and established his profession, and continued in its 
practice till the time of his death, which occurred August 21st, 
1883, at the age of 55. 

Dr. Merritt established an excellent and widespread reputa- 
tion as a dental surgeon, and secured a large practice. During 
the last years of his life he interested himself largely in im- 
provements uiDon his property, furnishing profitable employ- 
ment to many needy people, and the laboring man out of em- 
ployment found in him a willing and efficient helper. 

He was a man of quiet habits, taking no part in political 
strife, and devoting his time to his business and his family, to 
whom he was strongly attached. He was for many years a zeal- 
ous member of the Methodist Cliurch of Cai-mel. 

He was married in 1854 to Miss Antoinette, daughter of Mor- 
ris Brown. Their children are: Ella (deceased), David S., Anna, 
John B., and Jessie (deceased). 

Dr. Merritt was justly considered one of the most expert 
and successful members of his profession in the county. He 
was a well educated man, possessed of very original ideas, and 
an earnest worker in all that he undertook. 

TiiK Foster Family. — Thomas and Nathaniel Foster, broth- 
ers, came from Capa Cod in 1740, and settled in Southeast. The 
farm of Thomas Foster was west of Doansburg, and he resided 
there till the time of his death, about 1790. Tliomas had eight 
children. 

Of these, James settled in Southeast, where his descendants 




'^ 



a-^^/rx^ /'i 



C<;^^^<L^<r' 



TOWN OF CARJIKL. 4U'J 

are nutneroas; Setli settled on a farm aljout a mile east of Car- 
mel, where his grandson, William H. Foster, now lives; and the 
others went to Datchess county. Seth Foster married Haldah 
Ragan, about 1786. Their children were: Eleanor, wife of Jesse 
Kelley; Isaac, who died unmarried; Tilly, and Thomas. After 
the decease of his first wife, Mr. Foster married Elizabeth King, 
and had two children: Huldah, wife of Ebenezer Kelley; and 
Laura, who died unmarried. Seth Foster died September 15th, 
1837, aged 76. 

Tilly Foster was born in 1793, died April 4th, 1842. His home- 
stead was the farm on which the Tilly Foster Iron Mine is lo- 
cated, and from him it took its name. He married Sarah Arm- 
strong and had children: Isaac E.; Seth; Eleanor, wife of Mid- 
dleton Bell; Laura, wife of Nathan L. King, M. D.; Emily and 
James. By a second marriage he had one son, Walter, who 
died young. 

Thomas Foster was born in 1795, and died September 22d, 
1840, aged 45. He mariied Betsy, daughter of Joseph Crane, 
in 1821. They were the parents of two sons: Rev. Joseph, born 
1822, was pastor of the Presbyterian Church at Red Mills, 
from 1854 to 1859, and died in 1860, leaving no children; and 
William Hill Foster, born May 7th, 1824. The latter, who is 
now living on the ancestral home, about a mile east of Carmel. 
married Rachel Chapman, of Sharon, Conn., and has three chil- 
dren: Emma Josephine, Marilla Chapman and Bessie Crane. 
Mi-. Po5te)' has long been an active member of the Presbyterian 
Church of Carmel, and for twenty-five years has been one of its 
ruling elders. The homestead farm was held by lease under 
Frederick Philipse, by Seth Foster, from 1786 to 1801. In the 
latter year he bought the farm and built the present residence 
in 1811. 

WiLLi.\.'\i W. EvKKETT, widely known as president of tlie 
New Jersey Steamboat Company, is of Scotch descent, and is 
a grandson of the eminent Judge William Watts of Putnam 
county. His father, Leonard K. Everett, who married Miss 
Louise H. Watts, daughter of the judge, was a farmer residing 
at Carmel, where William W. was born, November 26th, 1S3S. 

After finishing his education at the Carmel Academy, now 
Dr.iw Seminary, Mr. Everett spent a few years in the homM of 
his parents, leaving at tlip age of twenty-three for New Ynrk 



410 HISTORY OF PUTNA^r COUNTY. 

city, where be entered a broker's office as clerl-c. He was tlaus 
employed during eight years, after which he returned to Car- 
mel, where he remained till 1877. He then came again to New 
York. 

At that time he was made a director in the New Jersey Steam ■ 
boat Company commonly known as the People's Line Steamers, 
and in the fall of the following year he was elected president of 
the corporation, which position he continues to hold at this 
time. 

Mr. Everett is a man of varied abilities and attainments. He 
manages the enormous business of the New Jersey Steamboat 
Company with promptness and dispatch, and lie has won for 
himself a foremost place among the managers of our great 
steamboat lines. His position brings him constantly into con- 
tact with the great men of the time and he is widely and favor- 
ably known not only throughout his native county, but 
through the entire State, particularly at the capital and in New 
York city. 

Mr. Everett was formerly connected with a number of social 
organizations in New York, prominent among which were the 
New York and Manhattan Clubs, in which his genial disposi- 
tion and open manner made him exceedingly popular. These 
same characteristics have also had a like effect in Putnam 
county, where he is' greatly esteemed. 

Mr. Everett married November 20th, 1860, Miss Georgenna 
Kelly, daughter of Robert W. Kelly and granddaughter of the 
distinguished financier, Daniel Drew. They have three chil- 
ren: Gertrude, Robert R. and Louise. 

The Weeks Family. — Hon. Chauncey R. Weeks was born 
in Carmel village March 12th, 1812, at the hotel on property now 
owned by heirs of Lewis Ludington. 

His father, Robert Weeks, was a physician of Putnam county, 
of whom a sketch is given in this work, in the chapter relating 
to physicians. 

His grandfather was a Quaker doctor and resided and 
practiced in town of Somers, Westchester county. 

The Weeks family came from Cape Cod, Mass., but were orig- 
inally from England. 

Chauncey R. Weeks was educated at the public schools. He 
first learned tlie harness making trade with James Raymond. 




^^J 




U^^t^^-^^;; 



TOWN OF CAKMEL. 411 

In 1833, taking a small interest with Waring, Tuffs & Co., in 
the menagerie business, he travelled through the Eastern States 
and Canada. In 1836, opened a general store in Carmel village. 
In 183S, was employed on steamboats on the Hudson River, as 
clerk, by Daniel Drew. In 1840, again engaged in the menagerie 
business. In 1842, became a partner with Raymond & Co., and 
travelled through United States. Later became a partner of the 
firm of Ogden, Weeks & Co. About 1860, retired from the 
menagerie business and became a stockholder in the People's 
Line of steamers on the Hudson. He was elected to the State 
Legislature in 1847 and again in 1856. In 1837, he married Ada 
Raymond, daughter of James Raymond of Carmel village. 
Their children are: James R.; Thomas R. and Edward C. (twins); 
Louisa and Chauncey R., jr., deceased. 

Edward C. Weeks, son of Hon. Chauncey R. Weeks, and 
present county clerk of Putnam county, was born in Carmel in 
1S44. He was educated at Raymond Collegiate Institute, private 
school at Croton Falls, and Eastman's Business College, Pough- 
keepsie. He has always been an active man of business and 
has held positions of responsibility. For a number of years he 
was employed in the Croton River National Bank at Brewster, 
and the First National Bank of Carmel. For four years he was 
in the employ of Van Amburgh & Co., as treasurer. Later he en- 
gaged and traveled with P. T. Barnuni as ticket agent. In 1880, 
he was elected supervisor of Carmel township. In 1881, he was 
elected county clerk of Putnam county and re-elected in 1884. 
For a number of years he has been secretary of the Putnam 
County Agricultural Society, and in 1885 was elected its presi- 
dent. 

In 1867, he married Josephine Howes of Carmel, daughter of 
William Howes, and granddaughter of Nathan Howes, the 
prominent representative of this old and well-known Putnam 
county family. 



CHAPTER XXII. 

TOWN OF SOUTHEAST. 

Settlement and Early History.— Early Records.— Supervisors.— Philipse Lot No. 
8. — The Fowler Family.— Milltown.— Columbia Library.— Southeast Center. 
Presbyterian Church at Southeast Center.— Doansburg. — I)e Forest's Corners. 
. — Line between Lots 8 and 9. — Presbyterian Church at Doansburg.— Dyke- 
man's Station. — Baptist Church at Dykeman's Station. 

SOUTHEAST, which is one of the towns formed in 1795, 
from the former towns of Fredericks town and Southeast, 
is bounded on the south by the county of Westchester, on the 
west by the town of Carmel, on the east by the State of Con- 
necticut, and on the north by the town of Patterson. 

The territory embraced in the town consists of Lot No. 9, of 
Philipse Patent, and the south half of Lot No. 8; also that por- 
tion of the Oblong which extends from the Westchester line to 
the northern part of the Oblong Lot No. 12. The length of 
the town from north to south is six miles, and from east to 
west, six miles and five rods. The width of Lot 9 is four and 
one-fifth miles. 

The south boundary along the county line west of Peach Pond 
has always been well defined, and a stone wall running west 
from that lake is the original line between Philipee Patent and 
the Manor of Cortlandt. To the east of Peach Pond the 
boundary on the Oblong was for some time in dispute and, in 
1803, an Act was passed which recited that " Whereas disputes 
and difiiculties have arisen relative to the northeast bounds of 
the County of Westchester, and the southeast bounds of the 
County of Dutchess," the supervisors of the towns of North 
Salem and Southeast were required to appoint a skilled sur- 
veyor, who should commence at the twenty mile monument on 
the north line of the Manor of Cortlandt, and continue the same 
line eastwardly to the boundary line of Connecticut; and it was 



TOWN OF SOUTHEAST. 413 

provided that the costs should be paid by Gilbert Field, Com- 
fort Field and Nehemiah Field, who were the owners of the 
land through which the line ran. There is a traditionary line 
which is recognized as the boundary, but we are not aware of 
any monuments erected by the provision of the act. 

The whole of Lot No. 9 of Philipse Patent, was the property of 
Roger Morris and Mary his wife, and was confiscated after the 
Revolution and sold in farms to various persons most of whom 
were already in possession as tenants. A list of the purchasers 
with the number of acres sold to each, will be found in the 
chapter on the " Confiscation and Sale of the Shares of Philipse 
Patent belonging to Beverly Robinson and Roger Morris." 
The settlement of this town began about 1730, when families 
from Long Island, or from the northern part of Westchester 
came to this region. The first settlers of whom there is any 
knowledge was the family of Samuel Field, who was the owner 
of Lot 5 on the Oblong, at the time of the division in 1732. His 
daughter, Jane Field, born in 1733, is said to have been the first 
white child born on the Oblong. The Townsend family prob- 
ably came about the same time, as David Townsend was the 
original owner of Oblong Lot No. 6, and in 1745, Elihu Towns- 
end (who was probably his son) was living here and in 
ISOlhe gave to his five grandsons, Abijah, Elihu, Samuel, Abi'a- 
ham, and Stephen, the sons of his son Uriah, certain lands in 
Lot No. 6, bounded east by the Connecticut line. The count}^ 
line runs through Lot 6, and Elihu Townsend's house was in 
Westchester county. In 1791, Isaac Townsend sold to Nehemiah 
Comfort and Gilbert Field a tract of fourteen acres, which lay 
next to the Connecticut line. In 1786, we find a deed from 
John Johnson to the above named Nehemiah Field, Comfort 
Field, and Gilbert Field, which conveys 26 a(^res "beginning at 
the northeast corner of Lot No. 6, by the Oblong line, and run- 
ning westward bearing ten degrees north 72 rods, and thence 
South 16 rods." 

As there is no record of the survey of the Oblong except the 
map, the above course of ten degrees north of west n)ay be 
taken as the direction of the bounds between the Oblong lots as 
the needle pointed at that date. The Fields and the Townsends. 
who were thus the earliest settlers, have continued the owners 
of land at the southeast corner of the county till the present 
time. 



414 HISTORY OF PUT:yA5I COUXTY. 

The next definite knowledge of the early settlers is in the 
record of the laying out of roads in 1745, which is found in the 
clerk's office of Dutchess county. From this record some idea 
may be gained as to the location of early settlers in the town. 
James Dickinson, from whose place several rog.ds radiated, 
probably lived on the south side of Croton River, at South- 
east Center, and on the farm afterward owned by Hezekiah 
Sandford, whose house is still standing at the intersection of 
three roads, leading respectively to Brewster, Milltown and to 
Westchester county; the latter being called the " Peach Pond 
road." John Dickinson had a mill at Southeast Center, where 
the "Sash and Blind Factory" of Isaac Armstrong now is, 
and that was probably the first in town, except Joseph Crane's 
mill on the Oblong. This latter which, as "Crane's Mills,'" 
was a noted landmark, was on Croton River about half a mile 
east of the Oblong line, and the mill seat and a large extent 
of land around it are now owned by Stephen C. Barnnm. One 
road is mentioned as running " from Crane's mills to ye bridge 
by Jeremiah Calkins." This latter place was at Milltown, 
where the road crosses the river. 

Edward Gray was the lessee of a farm at v?hat is now called 
Doansburg, and probably the one now owned by the heirs of 
Archibald Sears. 

Elijah Tompkins had a farm toward the north part of Doans- 
burg, next to the Oblong line, and James Paddock held a farm 
which continued in the possession of the family for many 
years, near the line between Southeast and Patterson. Nathan 
Bailey had a house near Peach Pond on the farm now owned 
by Gen. James Ryder, as early as 1745, and traces of the old 
road that led to it are yet visible. Edward Hall had a mill on 
the Oblong, probably at Milltown, while the names of Carhellas 
Fuller, Joseph Lee, " Capt. Ball," William Bloomer, " Capt. ' 
Wright," Samuel Jones, Nathaniel Stevenson, Joshua Barnes 
and Anthony Batterson occur as being settled here' as early as 
1755. David Paddock was the holder, as tenant, of a large 
farm of 304 acres next to the Oblong, and the same was sold to 
him by the commissioners of forfeiture, July 4th, 17S2. This 
farm lay at the vvest end of Joe's Hill, and descended to his son^ 
David B. Paddock, whose daughter, Mary, married Moses 
Richards, whose son, David Belden Richards, is the present 
owner of a small par*: of the original farm. The old Paddock 



TOWN OF SOUTHEAST. 41.-) 

homestead was on the nortli side of Croton River, on the road 
to Milltown, and the residence of Mr. Richards stands on the 
site. Between this house and the residence of Stephen C. Bar 
nam, the present owner of " Crane's Mills," runs a line of board 
fence which is continued south of the road to the Croton River. 
North of the road the board fence continues to the north, to a 
stone wall which runs still farther on. This line of fence and 
wall is the original Oblong line, and at the end of the stone 
wall (which terminates about a quarter of a mile north of the 
road) is the place where the "8 mile monument" stood. This 
monument, which marks the distance of eight miles from the 
angle in the Oblong line in Westchester county, is thus de- 
scribed in the original survey : 

"At the distance of eight miles as aforesaid, we set up a 
stake and heaped some stones round it for a monument, being 
between two rocky hills, about four rods from the eastermost of 
them, and marked some trees on each side of said monument 
in a nearly north 12 degrees 30 minutes. East Course." 

The " two rocky hills" still remain and are likely to do so. 
At a distance of four rods to the east of the site of the monu- 
ment, is a high ledge of rocks very precipitous and broken, on 
the south side, while about one rod southwest of the site is a 
large flat rock which presents a circular outline on its east side, 
and these will doubtless serve to fix the site for years to come. 

Ti> the south of the Paddock farm, and bounded east by the 
Oblong, was the farm of Col. Jonathan Crane, a prominent of- 
ficer in the days of the Revolution, and this farm of 118 acres 
was sold to him by the commissioners of forfeiture in 1782, 
though the family as tenants of Roger Morris had held it for a 
time. He left it to his son, Anson Crane, and his heirs sold it 
to William Storm, December 1st, 1866, and he in turn sold it to 
George C. White, and he to Ruth R. Kennedy, and the whole 
farm, or the greater part of it, came into the posse.ssion of John 
P. Kennedy, of New York, in 1879. Pie sold it in 1884, to 
George N. Messiter, and he transferred it to Charles C. Fitz- 
hugh, its present owner. This farm, known in modern times 
as " Fairview Manor," is one of the historic places of the 
county. 

Tiie "Crane's Mills" were owned for many years by Samuel 
Hall and afterward by his son Nathaniel, and in 1830 they were 
sokl by Jacob 0. Howes to Egbert and William Bouton. In this 



416 IIISTOltY OF PUTXAM COUJJTY. 

deed the premises are described as "beginning at the east abut- 
ment of the bridge that crosses the river near the dwelling house 
of William C. Trowbridge and running along the south bank of 
the river west to lands of Stephen C. Barnum, and crossing the 
river and the highway, runs northward along the land of David 
Belden Eichards to the eight mile monument, and then east by 
the land of Robert Brown to the place of beginning containing 
50 acres, with the grist and saw mills." It is probable that the 
north line here mentioned as running east from the eight mile 
monument, is the original line betweeen Lot 9 on the Oblong 
and the tract of "William Smith and James Brown next south. 
The mills and land above described were sold by William Bouton 
to Dr. Stephen C. Barnum, in 1S37, and they are now the prop- 
erty of Stephen C. Barnum, who inherited them from his father, 
Joshua Barnum. The new reservoir will obliterate the ancient 
landmark. 

By the tii-e that consumed the town hall at Brewster all of the 
early records of the town were burned, and the following is all 
that is left of the early chronicles: 

"At a town meeting held at the South Precinct, in Dutchess 
county, 6th day of April, 1773: John Ryder, was chosen Mod- 
erator; Isaac Elwell, Clerk; Chosen, Joseph Crane, Jr., Super- 
visor; Was chosen, John Field, Assessor; Was chosen, Samuel 
Bangs, Assessor; Was chosen, Peter Hall, Collector; Was 
chosen, Thomas Trowbridge, Constable; Mark Gage, Constable; 
Joseph Hull, Poor-master; Zebedee Briggsand Daniel Haviland, 
Poor-masters; Thomas Baldwin, Oliver Hecock and Seth Nick- 
erson, Commissioners for the highways; Benjamin Sears, Pound 
keeper; Daniel Haviland, Pound keeper; 2sathan Green, Jr., 
Fence viewer; Wm. Stone, Fence viewer; Uriah Townsend, 
Highway master JS^o. 1; Peter Hall, Path master No. 2; Nathan 
Green, Path master No. 3; Wm. Penney. Jr., Path master No. 
4; Harvey Hoi)kins, Path master No. 5; Zebedee Briggs, Path 
master No. 6; Nathaniel Foster, Path master No. 7." 

"Dec. ye 2nd day, 1776, at a town meeting held in Southeast 
Precinct: 1 Was chosen Deacon Foster for County Committee; 
2 Was chosen Col. John Field; 3 Was chosen Benaijah Tubbs; 
4 was chosen for sub committee, S. Squires, Homer Baldwin, 
Simeon Rider, Isaac Crosby, Benj. Higgins, Zachariah Hinman, 
George Birch, Capt. Joshua Barnum, Ebenezer Gage, Azor 
Barnum." 



TOWS OF SOUTIIKAST. 417 

At a meeting May 27th, 1777, it was voted that Nathaniel 
Foster, William Mott and Lemuel Bangs "be the three mem- 
bers to represent this Precinct, in general committee, and that 
Thomas Baldwin, Peter Hall, Simeon Rider, Joseph Field 
Jonathan Crane, Silas Youngs, Seth Sears, George Birch, Zach- 
ariah Hinman, be the sub-committee for the Precinct." 

At a meeting held April 3d, 17SS, the persons present unani- 
mously voted to adopt the Federal Constitution. 

Births in Southeast.— Mercy Clinton, August 31st, 1766; Phebe 
Clinton, May 24th, 1768; Esther Clinton, May 24th, 1770; Jesse 
Clinton, July 21st, 1772; Joshua Hinkley, March 11th! 1775; 
Elkanah Hinkley, July 19th, 1759. 

'• Benjamin Townsels ear mark is a crop on the right ear and 
a nick under it, and a half penny under side of the left ear." 

" Isaac Elwell's ear mark is a crop on the left with a hole in 
the same and a nick under the same." 

" Samuel Elwell, Jr., ear mark is a crop of the left and a hole 
in the rite." 

As cattle ran at large an ear mark was necessary to distins:uish 
them. ' '^ 

The following which speaks for itself, is well worthy of a 
place in history: 

"To all persons unto whomsoever these Presents shall come 
greeting, know ye that I Samuel Field of Oblong, in the County 
of Dutchess and Province of New York, For and in considera- 
tion of the free rights and liberties of all mankind and conceiv- 
ing it unlawful for a Christian to hold any of his fellow creatures 
in bondage for term of life: Do hereby from and after the 
thirteenth day of the fifth month called May which shall 
happen in the year of our Lord 1780, give nnto my Mulatto man 
bred by me known by the name of Philip his full freedom, to 
act & do in business for himself as of his own pi'oper rio-ht as a 
free man And to be free from all manner of claims or command 
in any kind of service whatsoever, either by me my heirs 
executors administrators or assigns forever. 

"In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal 
this tenth day of the second month called February in the year 
of our Lord 1776. 

"Samuel Field. 
" In presence of 

"Peteu Field. 
" Abkl Close." 



418 HISTORY OF PUTXAil COUNTY. 

That the precinct was not entirely free from evil doers, even 
in those clays of innocence, is evidenced by the following: 

"At a town meeting held 6th day of April, 1779, it was voted 
that Jabez El well make a pair of Stocks upon the cost of this 
Precinct." 

The house where Samuel Field lived is still standing near 
Peach Pond, and is probably the oldest house in Putnam 
county. 

SupjiRvisoKS OF Southeast:— 1787-89, Joseph Crane. 1790- 
99, Joseph Crane, jr. 1800-03, Joseph C. Field. 1812, 1813, 
Enoch Crosby. 1814, Peter Waring. 1815, Jonathan More- 
house. 181G, Joshua Barnum. 1817, Jonathan Morehouse. 
1820, James Hine. 1821, Hezekiah Sanford. 1822 31, 1835-36, 
Hart Weed. 1837, Stephen Warren. 1838, Ephraim Gage. 
1839, Reuben D. Barnum. 1840, 1841, Nathan A. Howes. 1842, 
John Crawford. 1843, Ebenezer Foster. 1844, Thomas Drew. 
1845, James Sherwood. 1846-48, Hart Weed. 1849, 1850, Na- 
than A. Howes. 1851, 1852, Tho. Crosby. 1853, Isaac Kelly. 
1854, Wm. H. Crosby. 1855, 1856, Morgan Horton. 1857-59, 
Daniel Baker. 1860, 1861, Morgan Horton. 1862-71, Charles 
W. Budd. 1871-73, Daniel Baker. 1874,1875, Stephen Baker. 
1876, Theodore Kelly. 1877-79, Daniel Baker. 1880, Theodore 
Kelly. 1881-85, Elbert C. Howes. 1886, John S. Eno. 

The northern portion of this town is embraced in Lot 8 of the 
Philipse Patent, which originally belonged to Philip Philipse, 
and after his death to his wife Margaret and his children. Mrs. 
Philipse married for her second husband. Rev. John Ogilvie, 
and hence most of the deeds and leases given during the last 
century were given by Margaret Ogilvie. The list of her tenants 
furnishes the best information that can be obtained of the names 
of the early settlers. After the death of Mrs. Ogilvie, her son, 
Frederick Philipse, became the sole owner, and in 1810 a new 
survey of the farms was made by John Conklin, a prominent 
surveyor, and in old deeds the boundaries are frequently al- 
luded to as "given in Conklin's Field book.'' Most of these 
farms were held by lease until 1811, and after that the Philipse 
family began to sell the farms, and the deeds given by Fred- 
erick Philipse and his daughter, Mary, wife of Samuel Gouver- 
neur, would make a volume of themselves. 

Tenants on Lot No. 8 in possession at the time the farms 
were surveyed in 1754: " Wm. Rapelyea, Reuben Rapelyea, 



TOWN OF SOUTHEAST. 419 

Elislia Baker, Elisha Kellock, Ebenezer Chase, Jo. Baker 
& Ebeiir. Burgis, Bethuel Baker, Nath. Astin, David Astin, 
Joshua Hinkley, Lazarus Griffin, Jacob Ellis, Edvv. Rice. Edm. 
Baker, Josiah Baker, John Finch, Dan. Townsend, jr., Moses 
Fowler, Peter Robinson, Caleb Fowler, John Kelley, Simeon 
Ellis, Gideon Ellis, Ebenezer King, Jonathan Kelley, Elnathan 
Doane ftnd son, Charles Townsend, Saml. Bangs, Abner Bangs, 
Wm. Penney, Eleazar Cole, Ebenezer Jones, Jacob Philips, 
Nehemiah Jones. Joseph Craw, Nathan Taylor, Silvanus Cole, 
Isaac Chapman, Elijah Tompkins, David and Joseph Crosby, 
Reuben Crosby, Israel Cole, Tho. & Jonathan Paddock, Jos. 
Vickery & Co., Joseph Taylor, Jon. Godfrey & Richard Gray, 
Moss Kent, Oliver Gray, Elijali White, George Hepburn." 

The tenants jn pos.session May 1st, 176S, were: "James Hagh- 
son, Joshua Conklin, Benj. Green, Tho. Lovelass & Josiah Ben- 
jamin, Malcom Morrison, Morrison Rice & Benj. Titus, Bethuel 
Baker, Abm. Maybee, Tho. Hinkley, Josiah Baker, Gillson 
Clap, E'dw. Rice, Edm. Baker, Josiah Baker, Gillson Clajj, 
John Burcham, Moses Fowler, Parish, Caleb Fowler, John 
Kelley, ' Simeon Ellis, Malcom Morrison, Edraond Baker, 
Jonathan Kellej^ Charles Townsend, Haws & \Ym. Jadd, David 
Crosby & Elisha Bangs, Wm. Penney, Jo. Garrison & Jo. Vick- 
ery, Ebenezer Jones, Jacob PhilijDS, Nehemiah Jones & Theoph. 
Jones, Joseph Philips, Josiah Swift, Silvanus Cole, Capt. 
Fleming Calgan, Elijah Tompkins, David & Joseph Crosby, 
Reuben Crosby, Israel Cole, Tho. & Jonathan Paddock, Jona 
Vickery & Moss Kent, Joseph Taylor, Ezekiel Burgis, Moss 
Kent, Zebulon Bass, Elijah White." 

The above is from a list made by Beverly Robinson and now 
among the Philipse i^apers. In 1810, a new survey of the lot 
was made by John Conklin, the field book of which is among 
the Philipse papers. 

List of Farms on Lot No. 8 (1810):— John Sunderland, 112 
acres; Elisha Merritt, 10-2; John Sunderland, 25; Peleg Ballard, 
120; Peleg Ballard, 18; Jeliiel Stevens, 68; Gilbert Merritt, 5; 
Elisha Merritt, o; Moses C. Robinson, 108; Enoch Crosby, 2d, 
22; Major Fowler, ; Abijah Townsend, 155; Amos Rogers, 

south lot, 10; Amos Rogers, home lot, 102; Amos Rogers, west 
lot, 37; Salome Wood, 95; Edward Fowler, 133; Daniel Gay, 
35; Samuel Pardee, 17: Grace Kelly, 105; Hezekiah Rowland, 
14; Lewis Rogers, 50; Peter and Daniel Kent (mountains) 20; 



42U HISTOKY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

Thomas Terry, 162; Ira Roberts, 87; Peleg Ballard, south wood 
lot, 7; Gilbert Merritt, 89; Ephraim Whiting, 43; Nehemiah 
Gifford, 60; Elisha Gifford, 212; Silas Whitney, 90; Abijah 
Townsend. wood lot, 4; Peter Dykman, 73; Daniel Baldwin, 91; 
Ezra Dykman, 61; Joseph Dykman, 57; Levi Baker, 110; Sam- 
uel Adldns, 1; Isaac W. Travis, 6; Philip W. Travis, 125; Heze- 
kiah Dykman, 156; Enoch Ferris, 52; Edmond Doan, 32; John 
Snow, 7; Jacob Ellis, 37; Peter Crosby, 17; Jonathan Smith, 
18; Jonathan Smith, 3; Stephen Minor, 10; Samuel Towner, 3; 
Henry Nichols, 31; Ezra Dykman, east lot, 8; John Snow, 
swamp, 5; Peter Crosby, Mountain lot, 17; Ferris Hill, 86; Abra- 
ham Hill, 110; Edward Rice, 7; Benjamin Dykman. 10; Elisha 
Hebbard. 4; Jonathan Godfrey, 8; Samuel Pardee, 22; Reuben 
Doane, 73; Thomas B. Sears, 12; George Murch, 1; Desire Murch, 
3; NoahBouton, 14; Peter Crosby, 61; Jared Bouton, 6; Nathaniel 
Hebbard, 1; Samuel Waring. 72; Peter Waring, 93; Stephen 
Minor, |; Archibald Sears, 110; Robert Penny, 51; Ezra Youngs, 
3; Jonathan Godfrey, 1; burying ground, 2; Levi Rowland, ; 
James Foster, 119; Henry Hoyt, 52; Eno(^h Crosby, 72; Abra- 
ham Mabie,86; AbielCrosby,121; JohnHows,42; William Snow, 
52; Jared Morehouse, 196; John Snow, 47; Hezekiah Rowland, 
16; Abraham Hyatt, 2; Edmond Foster and Stephen Crosby, 1; 
Dr. Daniel Read, 5; John Raymond, 8; John Raymond, home 
lot, 84; John Lawrence, 46; Abijah Seeley, IS; Edward Crosby, 
105; William Burhaus, 96; James Crosby, 149; Elijah Penny, 
97; John Snow, |; Abijah Seeley, 8; Charles and James Hines, 
79; AYilliam Burhaus, swamp lot, 4; Samuel Lawrence, 12; 
Michael Bournes. 221; Peter Terry, 16; Stephen Fowler, 128; 
John Robinson, 2; Daniel Gray, 14; Benjamin Dykman, 21; 
Benjamin Cowls, 6; Solomon Fowler, 17; Samuel Lane, 48; Ben- 
jamin Sills, 66; John Kellys, 22. 

In the vicinity of the Tilly Foster Mine was probably one of 
the earliest settlements in that portion of the town. In the sur- 
vey and division of the Philipse Patent in 1754, the west corner 
of Lots 8 and 9 was said to be "a walnut tree marked P. R. 
1753, standing on the south side of a hill near an old meeting 
house." The old log church in which Elisha Kent first preached, 
and which stood on the farm of James Barnes, near Dykeman's 
Station, is known to have been standing in 1745, and for that 
reason has been called the oldest church in the county; but it is 
no stretch of imagination to suppose that a meeting house 



TOWy OF SOUTIIKAST. 421 

which was "old'" in 1754 must have dated back at least as far 
as the date given above. The i^robability is that the two 
churches were contemporaneous. The people from the Oblong 
and the northern part of Fredericksburg attended the one, 
while the inhabitants of the southern portion and from the ad- 
joining region, attended the other. This meeting house stood 
near the northwest corner of the Jacob Ellis farm, on the west 
side of the road and directly opposite the old burying ground. 
This little cemetery, originally small, has been. made still 
smaller by encroachments on its northern part by the owner of 
the adjoining land. Here are the graves of the oldest residents 
of the vicinity, though few are marked with any monument. 
The oldest tombstone bears the following: 

" In Memory of Mr. Peter Hartwell. 
He died Dec. 13 a. d. 1760, ae 48. 

'• How soon his Morning Sun 

Falls down tlie western Sky, 

My Friends, let us be wise 

And now prepare to die." 

By the side of this is the grave of his wife, the headstone 
having this inscription: 

"In .memory of ilRS. Mary, wife to Mr. Peter Hartwell. 
She died July 15 a. d. 17o8 ae 41. 
" Beneath this Humble Stone 
In Death's cold arms to lie. 
Mouldering to dust. Death calls aloud, 
O, Friends, prepare to die." 

With the single exception of the gravestone of the wife of 
Rev. Elisha Kent, at Doansburg, these are the oldest in the 
county. The following dates are taken from the few rude monu- 
ments remaining: Daniel Gay; June 20th, aged 68; Sarah, his 
wife, October 22d, 1847, aged 93; Josiah Ellis, August ISth, 
1S42, aged 75; Elizabeth, his wife, November 30th, 1835, aged 
65; Jacob, son of Josiah Ellis, November 20th, 1829, 34. 

" In Memory of Joseph C. Wright. Wesleyan local preacher, 
born in Collington, Cornwall Co. England, March 3rd, 1846, 
died Jan. 25th, 1872. He brought me to his banqueting house 
and his banner over me was love." 

This last marks the grave of one whose brief life was full of 
usefulness, and his labors among the miners at Tilly Foster are 
worthy of fond remembrance. 



422 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

In an orchard to the north of this burying ground, are three 
tombstones, which mark respectively the graves of Heman 
King, who died January 21st, 1812, aged So; Elizabeth, his wife, 
August 30th, 1811, 81; and Jeduthan King, their son, August 
6th, 1789, aged 21. 

The Ellis farm was divided among the three sons of Jacob 
Ellis; Josiah, Ebenezer and Benjamin. The north part with the 
old homestead fell to Josiah, Benjamin had 39 acres at the 
southeast corner, and Ebenezer had his portion on the west side. 
Benjamin sold his part to Stephen Haines, who conveyed it to 
Phebe Fowler and Susannah Fowler, April 2d, 1823. These 
were maiden ladies of advanced age, daughters of Caleb Fowler, 
and from them it derived the name of the "Old Girls' Farm," 
a name which it still retains. William Fowler, the executor of 
the Misses Fowler, sold it to Horace D. Townsend in 1848, and 
it now belongs to the Tilly Foster Mine. The old house of 
Jacob Ellis stood at the north end of the farm and on the east 
side of tlie road. The house built by his son, Josiah, still 
stands, though dilapidated and uninhabited, on the west side 
of the road, just north of the highway that runs to the reservoir. 
The Ellis farm was bounded on the south by the farm of Enoch 
Crosby, whose fame as the original of "Harvey Birch," the 
hero of Cooper's " Spy," has given it a deathless name. 

At the north end of the Ellis farm is the division between 
Lots 9 and 8. All the land to the north derives its title from 
Philip Philipse, his widow, Margaret Ogilvie, and his son, Fred- 
erick. Here, on the northeast corner of the road, is an old 
house of Revolutionary times. This was in former days the 
home of Samuel Pardee, who was a soldier during the Revolu- 
tion and a blacksmith afterward, his shop standing on the west 
side of the road, opposite the house. He had a small farm of 
29 acres in the southwest corner of Lot 8, wiiich he bought of 
Frederick Philipse. The house and farm and also that portion 
of the Ellis farm which lies west of the road now belong to 
Elijah Fowler. After a long life of usefulness, Samuel Pardee 
died April 14th, 1847, at the age of 87. His wife, Abigail, died 
June 24th, 1825, aged 64, and both rest in an orchard on the 
south side of the road to Carmel, by the house of LeGrand 
Hughson. 

To the east of the old Pardee house and just west of the res- 
ervoir stands another old house, which was once the residence 



TOW:S' OF SOUTHEAST. 



423 



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of Major Fowler, and probably of his father, Caleb Fowler, be- 
fore him. The Fowler family were tenants of large farms in 
this vicinity, and Moses Fowler's farm and homestead was where 
his grandson, Elijah Fowler, now lives. The Fowler family 

are descended from 
two brothers, Moses 
and Caleb Fowler, 
who came from a 
place called " Saw- 
pits," now Port- 
chest e r, West- 
chester county. 
Moses Fowler was 
born in 1729, and 
died September 1st, 
1821, aged 92. He 
married Mary Brundage, who died in 1815. Their children 

were: Hannah, wife of Bailey; Jane, wife of John Strang; 

Phebe, wife of James Colwell; William, born January 15th, 
1761, died April 12th, 1842; Betsy, 2d wife of David Reed; 
Moses, born April 12th, 1765; Solomon, born June 7th, 1767; 
Jonathan, born September 11th, 1769; John, born December 
4th, 1771; Mary, wife of David Myrrick; Elijah, born August 
10th, 1776, died December 5th, 1825; and George, born Sep- 
tember 12th, 1779. 

Of these sons, Solomon left sons, Deacon William, of Patter- 
son, John and Moses. William had children, Daniel (who died 
October 15th, 1826, aged 26) and Clarissa, wife of Amos Fuller. 
John moved to West Somers, and George lived in Peekskill 
Hollow. 

Elijah Fowler married Polly, daughter of Thomas Fields. 
He left children: Mary, Susan and Elijah. The last, who is 
now living on the old homestead of his father and grandfather, 
married Susan, daugther of Isaac Hall, and his children are 
Carrie, George, James, Jennie, and Fannie, wife of Le Grand 
Hughson. 

Caleb Fowler, brother of Moses, died August 6th, 1S05, aged 
72. He had a wife, Eliza, and children, Susan and Phebe, who 
both died unmarried; and Major. 

Major Fowler married Patty, daugliter of William Watts, 



424 HISTORY OF PL'TXAM COUNTY. 

leaving children: John, James, Robert, Benjamin, Semanthe, 

wife of Brnnson, and Eliza, wife of Gregory. Major 

Fowler lived in the old house now standing on the north side 
of the road and jnst west of the reservoir. The farms on the 
southwest part of Lot 8 were sold to Moses and Caleb Fowler 
by Adolph Philipse about 1780. 

Among the deeds recorded in Dutchess county we find the 
following, which relate to lands in this town: 

John Ogilvie and wife Margaret sell to Thomas and Joseph 
Paddock "Farm 43, on the plan of the East middle Short Lot 
(Lot 8) Beginning at a white oak stump, at the Southwest cor- 
ner of Reuben Crosby's farm, thence South 88 chains, thence 
North 87 degrees. East 45 chains to the Oblong. Then by the 
Oblong North 11 degrees East, 107 chains, then S. 72i- W. 66 
cliains 50 links to the beginning containing 483 acres." March 
8th, 1770. 

This tract embraced the land lying north of Doansburg, and 
part of it was afterward sold to the Doane family. 

John Ogilvie and wife, Margaret, sell to Caleb Fowler " Farm 
20 on Lot 8, Bounded South by Col. Morris Lot No. 9, West by 
Moses Fowler and Jonathan Paddock, East by farm 24, North 
by Farms 23, 21 7," price £585. Caleb Fowler sold this farm to 
his son, Major Fowler, April 1st, 1790. This farm lies north of 
the bridge over the reservoir at Tilly Foster Mines. The old 
house of Major Fowler is still standing, north of the road, and 
is now owned by Elijah Fowler. 

Margaret Ogilvie sells to Reuben Ferris "140 acres in 
Philipse Long Lot (No. 6) on the east side of the Lot, and run- 
ning west to Mill river 140 acres, being the north part of the 
farm on which Reuben Ferris now lives." May 17th, 1791. 

This is the farm and homestead now owned by Samuel Ferris 
(grandson of Reuben) on the north side of the road which runs 
to Drewville from the highway leading from Carmel to Croton 
Falls.- This tract is in the town of Carmel, and is bounded east 
by the original line between Lots 6 and 9. The original deed is 
now in possession of Samuel Ferris, and is curious from the 
fact that it was written by Chancellor James Kent, when a 
young man, and is signed by him as a witness. 

North of the Elijah Fowler farm is the homestead and farm 
of Theodore Kelley, formerly supervisor of the town. This farm 
Avas in 1754 leased from Mrs. Margaret Ogilvie, by Daniel Town- 



TOWN OF SOUTJIEAST. 425 

send, jr. A part of it was afterward held by John Burchara, 
and on the Croton River close by are the remains of a mill which 
stood here during the Revolution and was a mill seat many 
years before. "Burcham's mill" is laid down on Erskine's 
military map, as a well known landmark in 1780. 

An encampment of American troops was near this place in 
the Revolution. 

MiLLTOWiv'. — This is the name of a locality on the Croton 
River near the middle of the Oblono-. It is probable that at 
this place was "Morehouse's Mill," which is mentioned in the 
laying- out of highways in 1745. At the beginning of the pres- 
ent century the mill seat was owned by William Crawford, and 
■was left by him to his son John, who, having no children, 
adopted Henry Barnum and left it to him. It is now owned by 
Mr. J. W. Boyce. At the corner where the four roads cross 
were the residences of several of the prominent citizens of the 
town in former days. On the northwest corner was the 
house of Capt. Ichabod Doolittle, who kept a tavern there 
in early days, which was a great resort for travellers on 
the road to Danbury. On the northeast corner was the 
house of Ithamar Weed and directly opposite and east of 
the scliool house was the home of his son Hart Weed, who 
was for a long number of years supervisor of the town. The 
residence of Daniel Sears was the old homestead of William 
Crawford. A short distance to the east, on the north side of 
the road, is the old house once the residence of Dr. Joseph 
Crane, who was well known as a physician for a wide circuit 
round. He left it to his son, Carso Crane, who sold it to Harvey 
Crosby, and it is now owned by George Sears. Previous to the 
Revolution there was a mill here owned by a man named Ryder, 
and it was known as " Ryder's Mills," but nothing is known 
of its transfer. In 1773 Charles Cullen, who married Lucy, 
daughter of Rev. Elisha Kent, had a house and store 'on the 
northwest corner of the road on the i)lace where Ichabod Doo- 
little's tavern afterward stood. 

Among the early settlers here were the Hall family. The an- 
cestor of this family was Peter Hall, who came from Cape Cod. 
He was l)nin May 9th, 1715. and died about 1782. His wife, Abi- 
gail, was hnvn in Xoveiuber,17]2. Their children were: Elizabeth, 
wife of Nathan Green; Mary, wife of Benjamin Sears; Morton, 



426 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COL'XTY. 

who died February 27th, ISIS, aged 75 and left no descendants; 
Bathsheba, wife of James Foster; Peter, who left no family; and 
David, born January 12th, ]7o6, and died November 17th, 1830. 
He married Lydia, daughter of John Roberts. Their children 
were: Patience; Peter, born July 1st, 1795 ; John, who married 
Harriet Northrop and had children David and John; Betsy, 
Abigail, Lydia and Amanda. Peter Hall, the original settler, 
came to this place in 1749, and settled on the Oblong, on the 
south tract, that in the original division fell to William Smith 
and James Brown. From the original deeds now in possession 
of Peter Hall it is learned that on July 12th, 1775, " Wm. Smith, 
Esq- of New York, and James Brown, Esq., of Norwalk." sold 
to Isaac Howes a tract of 155 acres. Isaac Howes by deed, June 
26th, 1764, sold the same to Peter Hall for £120, audit is des- 
cribed as "Situated and being within the tract called the Ob- 
long, and now in the possession of the said Peter Hall and 
bounded on the east by the Colony line." This farm, which is 
now the homestead of his grandson, Peter Hall, is situated on 
the north side of Federal Hill, and the road from Milltown to 
Danbury runs through it. The fence on the south side of the 
road has been from the earliest times the dividing line between 
this farm and the owner of land in the adjoining State of Con- 
necticut, and is doubtless the original " Colony line," though 
the new monument on the State line is a rod or so to the west. 
This point where the road crosses the State line is 605 chains, or 
7 miles and 45 chains from the angle in the east Oblong line in 
Westchester county. On the top of the hill or mountain to the 
south is a heaj) of stones supjiosed to be one of the original 
monuments made in the survey of the Oblong. The farm was 
increased in 1768, by the purchase of 100 acres from Isaac 
Crosby, and by various additions it now exceeds 300 acres. The 
original house built by Peter Hall is said to have stood on the 
south side of the road close to the State line. Peter Hall, his 
grandsrtn, who is now living on the farm, at the advanced age of 
90, is the oldest resident in the vicinity. The deed from Wil- 
liam Smith and James Brown to Isaac Howes, which is now in 
possession of Mr. Peter Hall, is the only original deed which 
we have been able to find, given by the original owners of the 
Oblong. AA'illiani Smith was a lawyer and judge of great repu- 
tation. He died in 1769, leaving a large family. Among his 
sons were Rev. John Smith, who was for mnnv vears minister 



TOWX OF SOUTHEAST. 427 

at White Plains; Joshua Hett Smith, who was the guide of 
Major Andre, at the time of his plot with Benedict Arnold; and 
William Smith, the historian, of New York. 

The old Milltown burying ground is the last resting place of 
the earlj' settlers of this portion of the town. From the ancient 
tombstones are copied the following dates of the decease of for- 
mer residents: Elihu Gage, died June 6th, 1834. age 58; Elizabeth, 
wife, April 24th, 1838, 64; Samuel Sears, Oct. 10th', 1830, 57;. 
Benjamin Sears, March 12th, 1827, 90; Mary, wife, May 26th,- 
1814, 78; David Penney, March 23d, 1814, 42; Samuel Hall' 
Nov. 8d, 1814, 75; Elizabeth, wife, March 23d, 1832, 82; Stephen 
Crosby, April 10th, 1851, 73; Lidia, wife, July 3d, 'l867, 87;" 
Syivanus Gage, March 13th, 1814, 62; Elizabeth, wife, March' 
17th, 1814, 62; Isaac Hopkins, March 16th, 1853, 71; Anson 
Crane, June 7th. 1860,77; Isaac Crane, June 1st, 1853, 72; Mary, 
wife, March 30th, 1868, 84; Jonathan Crane, Sept. '25th. 1878,' 
92; Orrin B. Crane, Nov. 7th, 1864, 70; Thomas Crosby, Feb.' 
16th, 1844, 76; Hannah, wife, Feb. 24th, 1853,' 83; Peter War- 
ing, June 27th, 1849, 67; Esther, wife, July 16th, 1831, 49; Isaiah 
Crane, Nov. 28th, 1842, 70; Kezia, wife, April 20th, 1849, 74; 
Nathan Richards, Feb. 15th, 1839, 62; Cynthia, wife, April 
20th, 1848, 72; Ezra Richards, April 25th', 1819, 68; Zalmon 
Sandford, Esq., April 30th, 1809, 41; Dr. Joseph Crane, Aug. 
20th, 1825, 76; Anna, wife, April 4th, 1807, 48; Jonathan Crane, 
Aug. 27th, 1834, 88; Bethia, wife, May 11th, 1839, 88; David 
Hall, Nov. 17th, 1830, 75; Lydia, wife, March 25th, 1856; 93; 
Morton Hall, Feb. 27th, 1818, 75; Patience, wife, March 11th, 
1828, 83; Thomas Baldwin, Jan. 2Sth, 1868, 91; Esther, wife, 
Nov. 3d, 1864, 72; Edward Rice, Nov. 6th, 1826, 61; Lucy, wife. 
March 23d, 1826, 55; Andrew Hubbell, Dec. 21st, 1843, 63; 
Sarah, wife, Aug. 1st, 1866, 84; Phineas Doolittle, July 25th> 
1814, 57; Sarah, wife, Dec. 20th, 1817, 55; Capt. Ichabod Doo- 
little, Dec. 17th, 1806, 76; Deborah, wife, April 21st, 1820, 93; 
AsaHoyt, July 31st, 1831, 60; Seth Sears, April 2d, 1809, 73; 
Capt. Knowles Sears, June 10th, 1817, 79; Capt. Archibald De 
Forest, May 13th, 1849, 32; Sally, wife, Aug. 3d, 1867, 68; David 
L. De Forest, Nov. 26th, 1819, 57; Sarah, wife, July 2Sth, 1822, 
56; Jonathan Couch, July 4th, 1845, 68; Esther, wife, May 13th, 
1819, 43; Betsy, wife, Nov. 22d. 1861, 73; Heman H. Cole. Aug. 
20th, 1864, 40; Timothy Cole, 1866, 82; Eliza, wife, 1867, 76; 
Col. Isaac Crosby, Nov. 22d, 1829, 46; Solomon Crosby, March 



428 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

16th, 1816, 66; Elizabeth, wife, May 3d, 1818, 66; Isaac Crosby, 
Feb. 17th, ISlo, 97; Thankful, wife, Feb. 19th, 1815, 87; Joseph 
Baker, April 12th, 1847, 81; Nathan Green, Oct. 22d, 1821, 86; 
Sylvanus Crosby, April 29th, 1814, 45; James Northrop, Oct. 
4th, 1855, 73; Joseph Haines, Dec. 17th, 1818, 65; Moody Howes, 
May ISth, 1827, 75; Esther, wife, Sept. 26th, 1823, 67; Charles 
Hine, Dec. 24th, 1846, 88. 

In 1879, a tract of land on the west side of the old burying 
ground was bought of Joseph B. Sears, and land was also pur- 
chased of Peter Hall, Edward Howes, Morgan Horton and Fer- 
dinand Hoyt, May 2d, 1879, and the Milltown Rural Cemetery 
was incorporated. The grounds of this cemetery are well kept, 
and there are many fine monuments erected to the memory of 
prominent citizens. 

On the west side of the road, and a short distance south of 
the old burying ground, is an old hoase which dates back to the 
days before the Revolution. This house was the residence of 
Nathan Green, who sold it to David Paddock in 1812. The 
place is now owned by Cyrus P. Hanford, whose mother was 
Phebe, daughter of David Paddock. 

Among the old families who settled here were the Gages. 
Elihu Gage was one of the early settlers, who came from Cape 
Cod and took a farm on the Oblong, at the place where Peter 
Foster now lives. He died August 14th, 1802, aged 76. His 
wife, Grace, died February 24th, 1814, aged 78. They had with 
other children, a son Thomas Gage, who had sons: Thomas, 
Elihu, Selah and Ephraim. 

Elihu Gage was born in 1776, and died June 6th, 1834. He 
married Elizabeth Field, and their children were: Elias, Ephraim, 
Russell, Joseph, Jane, Coles and Janette. 

Joseph Gage was the father of Mr. Cornelius R. Gage, now a 
resident and business man of Brewster. 

The Penney family, so well known in the town, are descended 
from William Penney, who came to the Oblong with his family, 
from Harwich, Mass., in 1747, and settled about a mile north of 
Milltown, on a farm which afterward belonged to Jonathan 
Conch, and is now owned by Clark Barnum. He married Han- 
nah, daughter of William Gray. Their children were: William, 
2d, born May 27th, 1716, died February 21st, 1786; and John, 
born June 15th, 1720. 

William Penney, 2d, married Deboi'ah, daughter of John 



TOWN OF SOUTHEAST. 429 

Weeks, and their children were: Temperance; George; William 
3d, born 1744, died August 8th, 1807; Edward, and Atnmiel. 

John Penney married Elizabeth Delano. His children were: 
Judith: Hannah; and Capt. John, born 1757, died Sei)tember 
27th, 1S'2G. 

William Penney, 3d, married Sarah Bangs, and his children 
were: Archibald, who died October 1st, 1841, aged 67; Robert, 
born 1776, died April 2Sth, 1836; and Darius, who married 
Elizabeth Hall. He lived on the old homestead near Milltown. 
His widow married Jonathan Couch, who bought the place. 
His son, Major-General Darius iS". Couch, who was a very 
prominent officer in the war of the Eebellion, was born at this 
place. 

Robert Penney married Betsy Hibbard and his children were: 
Polly, Huldah, Sally B., William, Esther, Darius, Laura and 
Elizabeth. 

Archibald Penney married Henrietta Wilcox. His children 
were: Mary, wife of Luther Burhus; Alfred C, now living in 
Patterson; Sarah, wife of Asa Hoyt; Charles W.; Charlotte, 
wife of Abner Crosby; Elijah, Hiram, Melissa, wife of Joshua 
Crosby; James, K. , Oliver, Cornelius, and Philip D., the pres- 
ent supervisor of Patterson. 

The most numerous families in this town in former times were 
the Crosbys. These families are descended from three brothers, 
Thomas, David and Joshua Crosby, who came from Harwich, 
Mass. 

Thomas Crosby came in 17o6, and settled on a farm south of 
the village of Carmel. 

David Crosby came in 1749, and settled on the Oblong. He 
died October 20th, 1793, aged So. His wife, Reliance, died in 
1788. His children were: Reliance; David, born 1737, died 
1816; Susannah; Abner, born December 2oth, 1744; Sarah, and 
probably Eli and Moses. 

Joshua Crosby married Lydia Hopkins in 1733, and came to 
the Oblong in 1749. His children were: Nathan, born 1734; 
Reuben, 1736; Joshua, 1737; Theodoras, 1739; Elijah, 1742; 
Hannah, and xirobably Isaac. 

The homestead of Joshua Crosby seems to have been the 
north part of Lot 10 on the Oblong a,nd his son, Isaac, lived 
there after him. Eli Crosby died November 22d, 1817, aged 
78. He lived on the farm now owned by his grandson, James 



430 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

Crosby, north of "Elm Trefi Farm,'" iu the town of Patterson. 
He married Rebecca Sears and had children: Eber, born Sep- 
tember Sth, 1792, died May 16th, 1836; Eli, 2d; Sears; Thank- 
ful, wife of William Penney; Huldah, wife of Ryder; 

Reliance, wife of Alfred Raymond; Esther, wife of Benjamin 
Sill; and SallVj wife of Joseph Baker. Eli Crosby, 2d, married 
Laura, daughter of Thomas Crosby (son of Abner). His chil- 
dren are: James (now living on his grandfather's homestead in 
Patterson), Charlotte, Sally B., Martha, Ellen, and Harriet, 
wife of Samuel Brewster, of Brewster Hill. 

David Crosby, brother of Eli, 1st, had a son Peter, who lived 
on the farm now owned by Frederick Brewster, near Doans- 
burg. He was sheriff of the county in 1813, and died in 1831, 
aged 68. 

Moses Crosby, brother of Eli, 1st, had sons, Epinetus (who 
kept a tavern in old times in the village of Patterson), James 
and Harvey. 

Abner Crosby, brother of Eli, 1st, owned a large farm on 
Hinckley Pond. He had sons: Thomas, Stephen and Foster. 

Eber Crosby, brother of Eli, 1st, married Esther, daughter of 
John Raymond. Their children were: Louisa, wife of Alfred C. 
Penney of Patterson; Nelson and Sheldon, both of Wisconsin; 
Lewis, of Brooklyn; Alfred, Francis of Tennessee; Julia, 
Catharine M., Eli, Orlando of Delavan, Wis.; Laura M., Henri- 
etta, and Emily B. 

Reuben Crosby, son of Joshua, was born in 1736, and died in 
1819. His children were: Abiel, James, Tertullus, and Desire, 
wife of Capt. John Penney. 

The Columbian Library, long since passed away, was founded 
in 1825, as may be seen by the following certificate: 

■'This may certify that whereas between 80 and 90 inhabitants 
of the town of Southeast, and the towns adjacent have subscribed 
the sum of about 170 dollars, and formed themselves into a body, 
for the purpose of establishing a Library, and agreeably to the 
Statute held our meeting on March 7th, 1825, at the store of Asa 
Raymond in said town, and elected Ephraim Gage Daniel Hor- 
ton Samuel B. Baxter Isaac Sellick Jr. and Thomas Higgins, 
trustees for the ensuing year, and that the name and style of 
said library is known ■ or called by the name of Southeast 
Library. 

'• Samuel Baxter, Chairman. "' . 



TOWN OF SOUTHEAST. 4di 

This library was kept at Asa Raymond's store, at Milltown, 
near the school house, for many years. The name was changed 
to Columbian Library a few years later. The library was finally 
sold at auction and scattered, and a few of the old books may 
yet be found among the old residents. 

Southeast Center. — The neighborhood where the Croton 
Turnpike crosses the Croton River is known as Southeast Center, 
though it was in former times generally called "Sodom," a 
name which has very justly been allowed to fall into disuse. 
This region includes several farms which were sold by the com- 
missioners of forfeiture. One of the largest was sold to Moody 
Howes, whose farm was bounded south by the river, north by 
John Dickinson, and east by David Paddock (whose farm is 
now owned in part by Belden Richards), and part of the Howes 
farm was on the northwest side of the river and embraced the 
premises where the elegant mansion of Seth B. Howes now 
stands, and which is on the site of the house where Moody 
Howes lived in olden times. Next north was the farm of John 
Dickinson, whose mill was an early landmark mentioned in the 
survey of roads in 1745. North of the farm of John Dickinson 
was the farm of Edward Rice. The line between them ran 
through Mud Pond, or Lake Kishtawana, as it has been lately 
called. Edward Rice s farm was bounded north by the line be- 
tween Roger Morris' Lot No. 9, of Philipse Patent, and Lot 8, 
belonging to Piiilip Philipse. The north part next this line is 
now owned by Benjamin Foster. Edward Rice left the farm to 
his son, Samuel, after whose decease it was sold to various 
parties by his executors. West of John Dickinson's farm was 
a tract sold to David Cowen. The greater part of all these 
farms will be covered by 'the new reservoir which is soon to be 
built, and Lake Kishtawana will be obliterated. The original 
farms have long been divided among many owners, and so far as 
known the place of Mr. Seth B. Howes is the only place in pos- 
sessi(m of the descendants of the original owners, and it has 
been in his family probably since 1745. 

North of Southeast Center, and adjoining the north part of 
Lot 9, was in former times the farm of John \Yaring, and the 
old homestead still remains in the hands of his descendants, 
being now owned by Mrs. Jane Newman, granddaughter of the 
original owner. John Waring came to this place from Norwich, 



432 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

Conn., before the RevoliUion and was tenant of a large farm, 
which ran west to what was then called Waring's Pond, and 
now known as Lake Tonetta. It was more generally known as 
" Tone's Pond," from a negro who lived near it. 

John Waring\s first wife was Joanna, who died in 1779: be 
then married Mary Elwell. He died February 17th, 1809, aged 
73, and left nine children: -Peter, Stephen, Polly, wife of George 

Gregory; Isaac, Samuel, Joanna, wife of Williams; 

Susan, wife of Jonathan Smith; Ruth, wife of Peter Crosby, 
and John. Mary, the second wife of John Waring, died De- 
cember 13th, 1835, aged 89. John Waring, jr,, died April 15th, 
1812, at the age of 43. Samuel and Peter Waring both owned 
large farms on the Philipse Lot to the north. Peter Waring 
married Esther, daughter of Thomas Crosby. Their children 
were: Jar vis, William, John T., Edwin, Aurelia, wife of Vin- 
cent, Paddock; Jane, wife of Robert Newman; Laura, wife of 
Sheldon Hubbell; Hannah, wife of David Underwood; Marrietta, 
wife of David Ketcham; and Catharine, wife of Levi Roberts. 
Peter Waring died June 27th, 1849, aged 67, and is buried in 
the cemetery at Milltowu, though most of the family rest in the 
Sear's burying ground, at Doansburg. The old homestead was 
bought by Mr. John T. Waring and presented to his sister, Mrs. 
Jane Newman. Mr. John T. Waring is a prominent citizen of 
Yonkers. 

The Pkesbytkriax Cjiurch at Southeast Center was a 
branch of the old church at Doansburg. That portion of the 
congregation residing in the south part of the town, wishing to 
have church services in a more convenient locality, presented a 
petition to the Presbytery at Bedford to grant them a new or- 
ganization as the "Southeast Presbyterian Church." To this 
petition twenty-six names wei'e appehded and the Presbytery 
granted the request Jane 7th, 1853. On the 14th of June the 
new church was organized by Rev. Messrs. William Patterson 
and David L-ving, and Elder Lee. George Cole was ordained 
as ruling elder. The services were first held in "Temperance 
Hall," opposite the church and now a dwelling. The charch 
edifice was begun in September, 1853, and dedicated June 28th, 
1854. The building committee were Judge Ebenezer Foster and 
Daniel Reed, and the cost was $3,000. This church stands on 
the north side of the road about one-eighth of a mile east from 
the bridge over the Croton River. 



TOWN OF SOUTHEAST. 433 

The first pastor was Rev. Winthrop Bailey, who came in De- 
cember, 1S53. He remained till tlie spring of 1862, when the 
Presbytery released him at his own request. After travellini? in 
Europe, in a vain search for health, he returned to this place 
and died here April 30th, I860. He was esteemed as an earnest 
preacher. In beaiing he was courteous, and in Christian char- 
acter he gave evidence of unusual spirituality. The trees that 
stand before the church were planted by his hand. His suc- 
cessor was Rev. Samuel Bailey, who remained a year. Next 
came Rev. J. M. Carmichael, who stayed the same length of 
time, and after him .Rev. Duncan C. Niven was supply for two 
years. The pastorate of Rev. A. R. Macoubry began October 
2Sth, 1867, and continued till the fall of 1885. A valuable his- 
torical sermon was published by him. 

No deed for the church lot is to be found on record, bat the 
land is said to have been bought of Nathan A. Howes. A lot 
for the parsonage was bought of Hannah A. Valentine March 1st, 
1859. A new church was built in the village of Brewster, in 
1884, but has not been dedicated. 

DoANSBURG. — The region in the neighborhood of the First 
Presbyterian Church, or Union Society, has long borne the 
name of Doansburg, from the family who have been residents 
here from the earliest settlement. It was here that the second 
church was built previous to the year 1761, and here was the 
home of Rev. Elisha Kent, and the scene of his life long labors. 
The first deed which we find for land in this vicinity is recorded 
in the clerk's office of Dutchess county. By this deed AVilliam 
Smith (then lawyer, of New York) conveys "to Elisha Kent of 
Newtown, Fairfield county, Conn , the two-fifth part of all that 
lot of land, situate lying and being in Dutchess county, being 
part of that land, situate, lying and being in Dutchess county 
being part of that tract of land called the Oblong or Equivalent 
lands, being Lot No. eleven. Beginning at the monument put in 
the western bounds of the said surrendered lands at the dis- 
tance of ten miles northerly from the monument at the end of 
the twenty miles from Cortlandts Point and runs from thence 
South twelve degrees thirty minutes west fifteen chains thence 
south seventy-seven degrees and thirty minutes east seventy- 
two chains and a half; thence nortli twelve degrees thirty 
minutes east seventy-two chains and a half, thence north 



434 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

seventy-seven degrees and thirty minutes west seventy-two 
chains and a half to the western boxinds aforesaid; thence 
south twelve degrees and thirty minutes west fifty seven chains 
and a half to the first station, containing five hundred acres 
with the allowance made for highways, said two-fifth parts are 
to be laid out by a line parallel to the most southerly side of 
the said Lot. Together with all the appurtenances, and ex- 
cepting and reserving mines minerals and pine trees." This is 
dated August 3d, 1743, the consideration being "£150 in cur- 
rent money." 

The south part of the tract which was thus sold to Rev. 
Elisha Kent lies directly east of the Presbyterian church, and 
is the south portion of the farm of Augustus S. Doane, the 
boundary line between this farm and the land of Frederick S. 
Barnum being the line between the Oblong Lots 11 and 10. The 
ruins of an old house are plainly visible a !e\v rods east of the 
Oblong line and nearly east from the church, and here is the 
place where Mr. Kent passed his days. The location of the 
farm and home of the minister readily accounts for the removal 
of the church from the old site near Dykeman's Station to a 
place more convenient for the pastor and probably for the 
people. The family which has given its name to this locality 
is descended from Elnathan Doane, who came to this region 
from Cape Cod about 1745. His son, Elnathan, was born in 
1747. and died August 13th, 1806, leaving five sons: Zenas, Ed 
mond, Demas, Elnathan, and Benjamin, whose descendants still 
remain. The house of Elnathan Doane was where the present 
homestead of Augustus S. Doane stands and the farm was next 
north of the farm of Rev. Elisha Kent. In addition to the home 
farm, he was the holder as tenant of a tract of 351 acres under 
Mrs. Margaret Ogilvie, which is described as "a rough farm." 
The home farm was small at first, bur by many judicious pur- 
chases and a remarkable tenacity for holding on to tliem, his 
descendants are among tlie largest land holders in the town. 

On the Ist of August, 1766, Philip Philipse gave to Moss Kent 
a perpetual lease for " All that Messuage and Tract of land sit- 
luite in Philipse Patent, Lot S, beginning at a walnut sapling at 
the northeast corner of Ezekiel and Jeremiah Burges' Farm, 
and from thence runs South 12 degrees and thirty minutes east 
25 chains then South 2 degrees 30 minutes east 2S chains and 20 
links to Zel)ulon Bass' farm, then South 80 degrees east 16 



TOWN OF SOUTHEAST. 435 

chains and 50 links to the Oblong: then north 11 east 58 chains 
70 links by the Oblong to Paddock's farm, then South 80 degrees 
west 36 chains to the place of beginning. Containing 118 acres 
including the dwelling house, store house and garden spot of 
the said Moss Kent around the buildings now within the said 
Kent's enclosures," " reserving all mines, minerals and ores of 
metal." The annual rent was to be " the sum of eight pounds 
current money yearly forever." 

The farm thus perpetually leased to Moss Kent, who was a 
son of Rev. Elisha Kent and in after years a very jDrominent 
lawyer, included the lands on both sides of the road, and ex- 
tended from the church northward along the Oblong, nearly to 
where the large barn of Augustus Doane now stands. At the 
beginning of the present century the part of the farm to the 
east of the road and also the farm to the east which belonged to 
the Rev. Elisha Kent, were in the possession of one Adad Brad- 
ley. A mortgage given by him to John Valentine in 1812, de- 
scribes a tract mortgaged as "beginning on the Oblong line a 
few rods east of the Presbyterian Church and running north 42 
chains and thence west to the highway opposite the barn of 
Thomas B. Sears," then south along the highway " to nearly 
opposite the church," and then by the old road to the place of 
beginning. This was afterward sold to the Doanes who also be- 
came the possessors of the original Elisha Kent farm, and they 
are still tlie owners. 

A large white house on the west side of the road belonging to 
Eli Baker was once the residence of Rev. Jehu Minor, who was 
a prominent citizen and well known as a teacher. In the latter 
part of his life the place was sold to Daniel Reed and Mr. Minor 
removed to Sing Sing, where he died. On the 15th of October, 
1827, Russell J. Minor sold to Reuben D. Barnum, a lot of one 
acre and lifty rods lying on both sides of the road and on the 
south side of his farm. Tlie deed, which is a model of e.xplicit- 
ness, is in Liber E, page 54. Daniel Reed sold the house and 
farm to James Cnvsby, in 1851. This piece was bounded on the 
south by the pai-sonage lot, which was then occupied by Rev. 
Mr. Stansbiiry. Upon this lot Mr. Bai'uum built a house and 
store and liere the post office was kept by Daniel Reed, while 
the road was a stage route. In the front of this store, which is 
still standing, tliere was in former times a large rock as high as 
a man's lieail. with artificial steps cut in it. This rock was 



436 HISTOEY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

Chancellor Kent's favorite resort for amusement, when a boy, 
and in after years when he returned to visit the scenes of his 
childhood it was one of the old landmarks whose disappearance 
he most regretted. It was blasted to pieces by Mr. Barnum 
more than 50 years ago. Russell J. Minor sold his house and 
farm to Daniel Reed, March 22d, 1845. Mr. Reed bought the 
store lot (formerly sold to Reuben D. Barnum) of the executors 
of Eber Crosby, March 16th, 1835. It is now owned by Abm. 
Sherwood. 

The house in which Moss Kent lived, and which was the birth- 
place of the renowned lawyer. Chancellor James Kent, was pur- 
chased -by the Presbyterian Church of Doansburg, in 1819 It 
was torn down and a new house for a parsonage was erected on 
the same site, about 1823. This last mentioned house is now 
the property of Frederick S. Barnum, Esq., and is on the west 
side of the road and close to the north line of his farm, and 
about three rods south of the house and store formerly owned 
by Reuben D. Barnum. Shortly before the destruction of the 
old house. Chancellor Kent came to Doansburg to visit once 
more the place of his birth. As he entered the house he seemed 
transformed again into a child. He requested at once to be 
shown a certain room, and then remarked to his guide: "I want 
to crawl under the bed and put my hand in a knot hole, where 
my brother Moss and I used to watch for a mouse when we 
were boys." And suiting the action to the word, down dropped 
the grave and dignified Chancellor of New York and (not with- 
out difficulty) accomplished the feat which had tickled his boy- 
ish heart long years before. 

In the year 1846, Mr. John Cullen Van Rensselaer made a 
iourney to Doansburg in search of a family Bible which had be- 
longed to his grandmother, Lucy, daughter of Rev. Elisha 
Kent. Previous to starting on his journey, he addressed a 
letter to his cousin. Chancellor James Kent, making some in- 
quiries concerning the family and in due time received the fol- 
lowing reply: 

"26 Union Place, June 1st, 1846. 
"Dear Sir: 

" In answer to your interesting letter of Saturday, I will now 
give the recollections I have respecting the parents of your 
mother. It is probable I am the only person now living who 
can e'ive-any information on the subject. 



TOWN" OF rtOUTIIEAST. 437 

" Cliarles Cullen, your mother's father, wiis an Irishman, and 
educated well as a merchant. He wrote neatly, read the Eng- 
lish Classics, and was of small stature and of polished manners. 
He was generous, amiable and hospitable and most kind to rae 
in the early part of my life. He was married to Lucy, a sister 
of my father. Moss Kent, and youngest daughter of Rev. Elisha 
Kent, a Presbyterian minister, who was well educated at Yale 
College, and. who became an ordained preacher and settled, 
say about 17-40, on the Oblong, now the town of Southeast in 
Putnam county. I well remember being present at a Sunday 
evening with my father and mother, about the year 1768, at the 
wedding of my uncle Cullen and my aunt Lucy. She was a very 
sprightly brunette, with black eyes and hair, and was always 
most kind to me, and at the recollection of her and her delight- 
ful connections in my bright and joyous seasons of youth, I feel 
the tears of sympathy starting in my eyes. When I rode from 
Norwalk to my father's house in the town near my grandfather, 
on a Sunday evening Dec. 30th, 1770, my aunt Lucy Cullen came 
out to the street and took me in her arms off the horse, for my 
blessed mother was then dying and did die in half an hour. 

" My uncle Cullen after his marriage settled as a merchant 
on the Croton River at what was called Ryder's Mills, about a 
mile south of my grandfather Kent, and of my own father's 
house. Uncle Cullen had a very pleasant, and for that day 
elegant, house and store, where he traded successfully down to 
the American War. There was a very polished and delightful 
family connection all prosperous at that period. My father was 
a lawyer and lived within half a mile of my grandfather. Uncle 
Cullen lived a mile south. Uncle Morrison,' a Scotch merchant, 
who married another daughter of the Rev. Elisha Kent and set- 
tled and did business prosperously six miles north of my 
grandfather's place, at Fredericksburg. Uncle Grant, a Scotch 
officer, lived on his half pay, eight miles north of the same, and 
married another daughter of my grandfather. He was a noble 
fellow and fell at the storming of Fort Montgomery, in the 
British service as a Major, on the 7th of October, 1777. Uncle 
Kane," an Irish merchant, married another of my father's sisters, 
and lived as a prosperous merchant in Pawlings Precinct, near 

' Malcolm Morrison, who lived in the present village of Patterson. 
'' J(3hn K.iue was the occupant of a farm on the Gore in the town of Pawling, 
now owneil by William H. Chapman. 



4'S8 HISTORY OF PUT^NTAM CoUNTT. 

Quaker Hill, about ten miles north of my grandfather Kent's. 
Here then on a line of twelve miles, lived Uncle C alien, next 
grandfather Kent, next my father, next uncle Morrison, next 
uncle Grant, and next uncle Kane. Here was a polished and 
prosperous line of connections living from 176Q to 1776, most 
respectably and happy as a family circle, but alas the American 
War came on and dispersed them all and all of them got ship- 
wrecked in their business and fortunes (my grandfather ex- 
cepted, who died in 1776) by the tempest of the Revolution. 
"My uncle Cullen remained and lived on his means, out of all 
business during the War. His resources were much exhausted, 
and toward the latter end of the war, say in 1783, he removed 
to a farm about six miles west of his former place and built or 
repaired a very good house and farm. The town is called Car- 
mel, and the farm was about two miles soutliof where the Court 
House in the now County of Putnam stands, and at this place 
my uncle and aunt Cullen both died— uncle Cullen about 1787. 
I do not know where he or his wife were buried, probably in 
some plain country burying ground, around there, for the 
country in that quarter was at that time and for some years 
very plain and poor. I do not believe anybody can tell where 
was the spot either was buried, or can designate the graves. 
The remains of my own father are dispersed to the winds and 
lost. He died in this city in 1794, and was buried in the Pres- 
byterian Church yard in Wall street, and when the ground was 
sold and built on, a few years ago, all the graves and their con- 
tents were removed without my knowledge and are gone for- 
ever. Probably the graves of your mother's parents have re- 
mained undisturbed to this day. My aunt Cullen lost her eld- 
est daughter early in July, 1792. She was about 16 years of 
age, and was spoken of as a very interesting and respectable 
young lady. It was a dreadful affliction to her widowed mother. 
She was probably buried aside of her father. I rode down from 
Poughkeepsie, on the 30th July, 1792, to visit my aunt Cullen. 
in her desolate state and tarried a night with her. From 1781 
to his dealli in 1787, I visited my uncle Cullen frequently. He 
was like a father to me and I loved him exceedingly. My father 
took great care of my aunt Cullen, while a widow, and as 
brother and sister they were affectionately intimate. I do not 
know exactly when she died. She died on the farm where her 
husband died, but I was not present at the funeral of either 




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TOWX OF SOUTHEAST. 439 

nor was my father. He lived up at Waterford and I at Pough- 
keei^sie, at the time. I presume that your mother was born near 
Ryder's Mills before ray uncle Cnllen removed to Carmel though 
I do not know her age exactly. The only family burying ground 
of my father Kent's family remains at Southeast Town near my 
grandfather Kent's house and meeting house. There his wife, 
the mother of my aunt Lucy, jdied and was buried about 1750, 
and the "rude memorial" of her grave in a coarsely carved 
stone, remains to this day. I was on the spot and saw it the 
31st July, 1844. My grandfather has a marble stone at his 
gi'ave, put up by some of ray cousin Kanes, and there is a 
grave stone of ray blessed raother, and these are all the sepul- 
chral monuments remaining of tbat once happy, respectable 
and prosperous family circle. Some of these details may ap- 
pear trifling but I thought they would not be unacceptable to 
your mother to whom I request you, when you write, to give 
her my love and respects. 

" I am Dear Sir, 

" Yours Respectfully, 

"James Kent." 

In an account of his journey, which Mr. Van Rensselaer sent 
to the author of this work, he narrates as follows: 

"The house of the Rev. Elisha Keni, on the elevation back 
of the church, was in good condition when I saw it in 1846. 
With the exception of the portico in front, it was unchanged 
after the lapse of a hundred years. It -was a large two story 
house. Entering the front door I found a small passage about 
eight feet by four or five feet; in the rear of this passage or en- 
try an immense chimney,- which was the kitchen chimney, the 
kitchen room being back of it. The right hand door on enter- 
ing this passage, opened to the family room, where old Mr. 
Kent used to liang his pipe. The room over it being the one 
where he had his study, and where he used to retire to pray. 
The room to the left being a large handsome room, properly 
ihe room, where my grandmother Lucy and the other daughters 
of Priest Kent were married. In the rear of all an immense 
kitchen. The house was in every part of oak, even to the board- 
ing out side, which accounts for its long and good preservation 
and it must have been considered in the old days as handsome 
and e.vpensive. There was a farm attached, which Priest Kent 
cultivated and which now belongs to a Mr. Doane. 



440 HISTORY OF PUTNAM COUNTY. 

"la my visiting of all these localities, I was accompauied by 
Dr. Daniel Reed. He told me the Chancellor came to see the 
house where he was born, and when he was about sixty years 
of age. This must have been about 1824. The first thing the 
Chancellor did, after entering the house, was to go to a room, 
and there seek (the Dr. said in crawling) under a bed, a knot 
hole, where he and his brother Moss had amused themselves in 
watching for a mouse in their childhood. In the joyful excite- 
ment of finding it he fairh' danced around the room. When I 
was there the site of the old house was occupisd by a double 
one story one, in cottage style; the first house south of what 
was then Daniel Reed's store, under the hill, on the west side 
of the road." 

The old parsonage house was torn down about 1888, and a 
heap of ruins a short distance east of the church marks the 
site. 

The cemetery at Doansburg is generally known as the " Sears 
Burying Ground," from its being near the farm a